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The Glasgow Prognostic Score predicts poor survival in cisplatin-based treated patients with metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

Chen C, Sun P, Dai QS, Weng HW, Li HP, Ye S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Among the above three inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems, GPS (P<0.001) and NLR (P = 0.019) were independently associated with overall survival, which showed to be stable in a bootstrap resampling study.The GPS consistently showed a higher AUC value at 6-month (0.805), 12-month (0.705), and 24-month (0.705) in comparison with NLR and PLR.Further analysis of the association of GPS with progression-free survival showed GPS was also associated independently with progression-free survival (P<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Several inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems, including Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) have been reported to predict survival in many malignancies, whereas their role in metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical value of these prognostic scoring systems in a cohort of cisplatin-based treated patients with metastatic NPC.

Methods: Two hundred and eleven patients with histologically proven metastatic NPC treated with first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. Demographics, disease-related characteristics and relevant laboratory data before treatment were recorded. GPS, NLR and PLR were calculated as described previously. Response to first-line therapy and survival data were also collected. Survival was analyzed in Cox regressions and stability of the models was examined by bootstrap resampling. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) was calculated to compare the discriminatory ability of each scoring system.

Results: Among the above three inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems, GPS (P<0.001) and NLR (P = 0.019) were independently associated with overall survival, which showed to be stable in a bootstrap resampling study. The GPS consistently showed a higher AUC value at 6-month (0.805), 12-month (0.705), and 24-month (0.705) in comparison with NLR and PLR. Further analysis of the association of GPS with progression-free survival showed GPS was also associated independently with progression-free survival (P<0.001).

Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that the GPS may be of prognostic value in metastatic NPC patients treated with cisplatin-based palliative chemotherapy and facilitate individualized treatment. However a prospective study to validate this prognostic model is still needed.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Comparisons of the area under the receiver operating curve for survival status between scoring systems at 6 month (A), 12 month (B) and 24 month (C).
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pone-0112581-g002: Comparisons of the area under the receiver operating curve for survival status between scoring systems at 6 month (A), 12 month (B) and 24 month (C).

Mentions: Moreover, the two inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems constructed by categorizing the continuous variables of NLR and PLR as described before were compared with the GPS. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for survival status at 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month of follow-up, and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was compared (Fig. 2) to assess the discrimination ability of each scoring system. The GPS consistently show a higher AUC value at 6-month (0.805), 12-month (0.705), and 24-month (0.705) in comparison with other inflammation-based prognostic scores.


The Glasgow Prognostic Score predicts poor survival in cisplatin-based treated patients with metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

Chen C, Sun P, Dai QS, Weng HW, Li HP, Ye S - PLoS ONE (2014)

Comparisons of the area under the receiver operating curve for survival status between scoring systems at 6 month (A), 12 month (B) and 24 month (C).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230992&req=5

pone-0112581-g002: Comparisons of the area under the receiver operating curve for survival status between scoring systems at 6 month (A), 12 month (B) and 24 month (C).
Mentions: Moreover, the two inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems constructed by categorizing the continuous variables of NLR and PLR as described before were compared with the GPS. Receiver operating characteristic curves were constructed for survival status at 6-month, 12-month, and 24-month of follow-up, and the area under the ROC curve (AUC) was compared (Fig. 2) to assess the discrimination ability of each scoring system. The GPS consistently show a higher AUC value at 6-month (0.805), 12-month (0.705), and 24-month (0.705) in comparison with other inflammation-based prognostic scores.

Bottom Line: Among the above three inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems, GPS (P<0.001) and NLR (P = 0.019) were independently associated with overall survival, which showed to be stable in a bootstrap resampling study.The GPS consistently showed a higher AUC value at 6-month (0.805), 12-month (0.705), and 24-month (0.705) in comparison with NLR and PLR.Further analysis of the association of GPS with progression-free survival showed GPS was also associated independently with progression-free survival (P<0.001).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Background: Several inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems, including Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and platelet to lymphocyte ratio (PLR) have been reported to predict survival in many malignancies, whereas their role in metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the clinical value of these prognostic scoring systems in a cohort of cisplatin-based treated patients with metastatic NPC.

Methods: Two hundred and eleven patients with histologically proven metastatic NPC treated with first-line cisplatin-based chemotherapy were retrospectively evaluated. Demographics, disease-related characteristics and relevant laboratory data before treatment were recorded. GPS, NLR and PLR were calculated as described previously. Response to first-line therapy and survival data were also collected. Survival was analyzed in Cox regressions and stability of the models was examined by bootstrap resampling. The area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUC) was calculated to compare the discriminatory ability of each scoring system.

Results: Among the above three inflammation-based prognostic scoring systems, GPS (P<0.001) and NLR (P = 0.019) were independently associated with overall survival, which showed to be stable in a bootstrap resampling study. The GPS consistently showed a higher AUC value at 6-month (0.805), 12-month (0.705), and 24-month (0.705) in comparison with NLR and PLR. Further analysis of the association of GPS with progression-free survival showed GPS was also associated independently with progression-free survival (P<0.001).

Conclusions: Our study demonstrated that the GPS may be of prognostic value in metastatic NPC patients treated with cisplatin-based palliative chemotherapy and facilitate individualized treatment. However a prospective study to validate this prognostic model is still needed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus