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Influenza vaccine effectiveness in preventing influenza A(H3N2)-related hospitalizations in adults targeted for vaccination by type of vaccine: a hospital-based test-negative study, 2011-2012 A(H3N2) predominant influenza season, Valencia, Spain.

Puig-Barberà J, García-de-Lomas J, Díez-Domingo J, Arnedo-Pena A, Ruiz-García M, Limón-Ramírez R, Pérez-Vilar S, Micó-Esparza JL, Tortajada-Girbés M, Carratalá-Munuera C, Larrea-González R, Beltrán-Garrido JM, Otero-Reigada Mdel C, Mollar-Maseres J, Correcher-Medina P, Schwarz-Chavarri G, Gil-Guillén V, Valencia Hospital Network for the Study of Influenza and Respiratory Virus Disea - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Most evidence of the effectiveness of influenza vaccines comes from studies conducted in primary care, but less is known about their effectiveness in preventing serious complications.The split-influenza vaccine was effective in preventing influenza-associated hospitalizations in adults aged under 65.The intradermal vaccine was moderately effective in those aged 65 and over.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fundación para el Fomento de la Investigación Sanitaria y Biomédica de la Comunitat Valenciana (FISABIO), Valencia, Spain; Centro de Salud Pública de Castellón, Castellón, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: Most evidence of the effectiveness of influenza vaccines comes from studies conducted in primary care, but less is known about their effectiveness in preventing serious complications. Here, we examined the influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against hospitalization with PCR-confirmed influenza in the predominant A(H3N2) 2011-2012 influenza season.

Methods: A hospital-based, test-negative study was conducted in nine hospitals in Valencia, Spain. All emergency admissions with a predefined subset of symptoms were eligible. We enrolled consenting adults age 18 and over, targeted for influenza vaccination because of comorbidity, with symptoms of influenza-like-illness within seven days of admission. We estimated IVE as (1-adjusted vaccination odds ratio)*100 after accounting for major confounders, calendar time and recruitment hospital.

Results: The subjects included 544 positive for influenza A(H3N2) and 1,370 negative for influenza admissions. Age was an IVE modifying factor. Regardless of vaccine administration, IVE was 72% (38 to 88%) in subjects aged under 65 and 21% (-5% to 40%) in subjects aged 65 and over. By type of vaccine, the IVE of classical intramuscular split-influenza vaccine, used in subjects 18 to 64, was 68% (12% to 88%). The IVE for intradermal and virosomal influenza vaccines, used in subjects aged 65 and over, was 39% (11% to 58%) and 16% (-39% to 49%), respectively.

Conclusions: The split-influenza vaccine was effective in preventing influenza-associated hospitalizations in adults aged under 65. The intradermal vaccine was moderately effective in those aged 65 and over.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

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Mentions: We identified 7,122 eligible admissions and included after consent 1,914 subjects who complied with the criteria for inclusion. A total of 544 (29%) were positive for influenza A(H3N2) and 1,370 (71%) were negative for influenza (Figure 1). The study period began on December 18, 2011, epidemiological week 51–2011, and ended on March 31, 2012, epidemiological week 13–2012 (Figure 2).


Influenza vaccine effectiveness in preventing influenza A(H3N2)-related hospitalizations in adults targeted for vaccination by type of vaccine: a hospital-based test-negative study, 2011-2012 A(H3N2) predominant influenza season, Valencia, Spain.

Puig-Barberà J, García-de-Lomas J, Díez-Domingo J, Arnedo-Pena A, Ruiz-García M, Limón-Ramírez R, Pérez-Vilar S, Micó-Esparza JL, Tortajada-Girbés M, Carratalá-Munuera C, Larrea-González R, Beltrán-Garrido JM, Otero-Reigada Mdel C, Mollar-Maseres J, Correcher-Medina P, Schwarz-Chavarri G, Gil-Guillén V, Valencia Hospital Network for the Study of Influenza and Respiratory Virus Disea - PLoS ONE (2014)

Flow diagram of study subjects.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230985&req=5

pone-0112294-g001: Flow diagram of study subjects.
Mentions: We identified 7,122 eligible admissions and included after consent 1,914 subjects who complied with the criteria for inclusion. A total of 544 (29%) were positive for influenza A(H3N2) and 1,370 (71%) were negative for influenza (Figure 1). The study period began on December 18, 2011, epidemiological week 51–2011, and ended on March 31, 2012, epidemiological week 13–2012 (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: Most evidence of the effectiveness of influenza vaccines comes from studies conducted in primary care, but less is known about their effectiveness in preventing serious complications.The split-influenza vaccine was effective in preventing influenza-associated hospitalizations in adults aged under 65.The intradermal vaccine was moderately effective in those aged 65 and over.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Fundación para el Fomento de la Investigación Sanitaria y Biomédica de la Comunitat Valenciana (FISABIO), Valencia, Spain; Centro de Salud Pública de Castellón, Castellón, Spain.

ABSTRACT

Background: Most evidence of the effectiveness of influenza vaccines comes from studies conducted in primary care, but less is known about their effectiveness in preventing serious complications. Here, we examined the influenza vaccine effectiveness (IVE) against hospitalization with PCR-confirmed influenza in the predominant A(H3N2) 2011-2012 influenza season.

Methods: A hospital-based, test-negative study was conducted in nine hospitals in Valencia, Spain. All emergency admissions with a predefined subset of symptoms were eligible. We enrolled consenting adults age 18 and over, targeted for influenza vaccination because of comorbidity, with symptoms of influenza-like-illness within seven days of admission. We estimated IVE as (1-adjusted vaccination odds ratio)*100 after accounting for major confounders, calendar time and recruitment hospital.

Results: The subjects included 544 positive for influenza A(H3N2) and 1,370 negative for influenza admissions. Age was an IVE modifying factor. Regardless of vaccine administration, IVE was 72% (38 to 88%) in subjects aged under 65 and 21% (-5% to 40%) in subjects aged 65 and over. By type of vaccine, the IVE of classical intramuscular split-influenza vaccine, used in subjects 18 to 64, was 68% (12% to 88%). The IVE for intradermal and virosomal influenza vaccines, used in subjects aged 65 and over, was 39% (11% to 58%) and 16% (-39% to 49%), respectively.

Conclusions: The split-influenza vaccine was effective in preventing influenza-associated hospitalizations in adults aged under 65. The intradermal vaccine was moderately effective in those aged 65 and over.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus