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What should autism research focus upon? Community views and priorities from the United Kingdom.

Pellicano E, Dinsmore A, Charman T - Autism (2014)

Bottom Line: Interviews and focus groups were conducted with autistic adults, family members, practitioners and researchers to identify their priorities for research.We also captured the views of a large number of stakeholders via an online survey.There was general consensus that future priorities for autism research should lie in those areas that make a difference to people's day-to-day lives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Education, University of London, UK University of Western Australia, Australia l.pellicano@ioe.ac.uk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Pie chart showing the breakdown of UK autism research grant funding between 2007 and 2011 (see Pellicano et al., 2013, for details; also see Office of Autism Research Coordination, National Institute of Mental Health, on behalf of the IACC, 2012). Diagnosis, symptoms and behaviour included projects on diagnostic and screening tools, early signs and biomarkers, subtypes, symptomatology and epidemiology. Biology, brain and cognition included projects on cognition, sensory and motor function, computational science, co-occurring conditions, longitudinal studies, immune/metabolic/molecular pathways, neural systems and neuropathology. Causes included projects on genetic risk factors, environmental risk factors and epigenetics. Treatments and interventions included behavioural and developmental, complementary and alternative, educational, medical, occupational and technology-based interventions and supports. Services included projects on community inclusion programmes, effective service delivery, family well-being and safety, practitioner training and service utilisation and access. Societal issues included projects on the economics of autism, research policy, social, ethical and legal issues, and biographical, sociological and ethnographical work.
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fig1-1362361314529627: Pie chart showing the breakdown of UK autism research grant funding between 2007 and 2011 (see Pellicano et al., 2013, for details; also see Office of Autism Research Coordination, National Institute of Mental Health, on behalf of the IACC, 2012). Diagnosis, symptoms and behaviour included projects on diagnostic and screening tools, early signs and biomarkers, subtypes, symptomatology and epidemiology. Biology, brain and cognition included projects on cognition, sensory and motor function, computational science, co-occurring conditions, longitudinal studies, immune/metabolic/molecular pathways, neural systems and neuropathology. Causes included projects on genetic risk factors, environmental risk factors and epigenetics. Treatments and interventions included behavioural and developmental, complementary and alternative, educational, medical, occupational and technology-based interventions and supports. Services included projects on community inclusion programmes, effective service delivery, family well-being and safety, practitioner training and service utilisation and access. Societal issues included projects on the economics of autism, research policy, social, ethical and legal issues, and biographical, sociological and ethnographical work.

Mentions: The same cannot be said, however, for the current funding landscape in the UK. Analysis of 106 funding awards made between 2007 and 2011 showed that projects in the areas of biology, brain and cognition far outstripped all other areas of autism research – both in terms of number of awards made and money spent (Pellicano et al., 2013). More than half (56%) of the UK grant expenditure went towards such grants, totalling £11.6 million spread across 60 research projects (see Figure 1). Comparatively little research in the UK during this period was targeted towards identifying effective services for autistic people and their families (5% of funding), on diagnosis (5%) and interventions (18%) or on societal issues (1%). These figures suggest that research funding in the UK is much less evenly distributed across the different research areas than in the US.


What should autism research focus upon? Community views and priorities from the United Kingdom.

Pellicano E, Dinsmore A, Charman T - Autism (2014)

Pie chart showing the breakdown of UK autism research grant funding between 2007 and 2011 (see Pellicano et al., 2013, for details; also see Office of Autism Research Coordination, National Institute of Mental Health, on behalf of the IACC, 2012). Diagnosis, symptoms and behaviour included projects on diagnostic and screening tools, early signs and biomarkers, subtypes, symptomatology and epidemiology. Biology, brain and cognition included projects on cognition, sensory and motor function, computational science, co-occurring conditions, longitudinal studies, immune/metabolic/molecular pathways, neural systems and neuropathology. Causes included projects on genetic risk factors, environmental risk factors and epigenetics. Treatments and interventions included behavioural and developmental, complementary and alternative, educational, medical, occupational and technology-based interventions and supports. Services included projects on community inclusion programmes, effective service delivery, family well-being and safety, practitioner training and service utilisation and access. Societal issues included projects on the economics of autism, research policy, social, ethical and legal issues, and biographical, sociological and ethnographical work.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230972&req=5

fig1-1362361314529627: Pie chart showing the breakdown of UK autism research grant funding between 2007 and 2011 (see Pellicano et al., 2013, for details; also see Office of Autism Research Coordination, National Institute of Mental Health, on behalf of the IACC, 2012). Diagnosis, symptoms and behaviour included projects on diagnostic and screening tools, early signs and biomarkers, subtypes, symptomatology and epidemiology. Biology, brain and cognition included projects on cognition, sensory and motor function, computational science, co-occurring conditions, longitudinal studies, immune/metabolic/molecular pathways, neural systems and neuropathology. Causes included projects on genetic risk factors, environmental risk factors and epigenetics. Treatments and interventions included behavioural and developmental, complementary and alternative, educational, medical, occupational and technology-based interventions and supports. Services included projects on community inclusion programmes, effective service delivery, family well-being and safety, practitioner training and service utilisation and access. Societal issues included projects on the economics of autism, research policy, social, ethical and legal issues, and biographical, sociological and ethnographical work.
Mentions: The same cannot be said, however, for the current funding landscape in the UK. Analysis of 106 funding awards made between 2007 and 2011 showed that projects in the areas of biology, brain and cognition far outstripped all other areas of autism research – both in terms of number of awards made and money spent (Pellicano et al., 2013). More than half (56%) of the UK grant expenditure went towards such grants, totalling £11.6 million spread across 60 research projects (see Figure 1). Comparatively little research in the UK during this period was targeted towards identifying effective services for autistic people and their families (5% of funding), on diagnosis (5%) and interventions (18%) or on societal issues (1%). These figures suggest that research funding in the UK is much less evenly distributed across the different research areas than in the US.

Bottom Line: Interviews and focus groups were conducted with autistic adults, family members, practitioners and researchers to identify their priorities for research.We also captured the views of a large number of stakeholders via an online survey.There was general consensus that future priorities for autism research should lie in those areas that make a difference to people's day-to-day lives.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Education, University of London, UK University of Western Australia, Australia l.pellicano@ioe.ac.uk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus