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Hypomanic Experience in Young Adults Confers Vulnerability to Intrusive Imagery After Experimental Trauma: Relevance for Bipolar Disorder.

Malik A, Goodwin GM, Hoppitt L, Holmes EA - Clin Psychol Sci (2014)

Bottom Line: The current study assessed, prospectively, whether significant hypomanic experience (contrasting groups scoring high vs. low on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire, MDQ) places individuals at increased risk of visual reexperiencing after experimental stress.Findings suggest hypomanic experience is associated with developing more frequent intrusive imagery of a stressor.Because mental imagery powerfully affects emotion, such imagery may contribute to bipolar mood instability and offer a cognitive treatment target.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Oxford.

ABSTRACT
Emotional mental imagery occurs across anxiety disorders, yet is neglected in bipolar disorder despite high anxiety comorbidity. Furthermore, a heightened susceptibility to developing intrusive mental images of stressful events in bipolar disorder and people vulnerable to it (with hypomanic experience) has been suggested. The current study assessed, prospectively, whether significant hypomanic experience (contrasting groups scoring high vs. low on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire, MDQ) places individuals at increased risk of visual reexperiencing after experimental stress. A total of 110 young adults watched a trauma film and recorded film-related intrusive images for 6 days. Compared to the low MDQ group, the high MDQ group experienced approximately twice as many intrusive images, substantiated by convergent measures. Findings suggest hypomanic experience is associated with developing more frequent intrusive imagery of a stressor. Because mental imagery powerfully affects emotion, such imagery may contribute to bipolar mood instability and offer a cognitive treatment target.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mean frequency of film-related intrusive images reported via short messaging service (SMS) prompts, intrusive images triggered by the Intrusion Provocation Task (IPT), and Impact of Event Scale–Revised Total Score (IES-R) for high Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ; n = 50) and low MDQ groups (n = 60). The IES-R is multiplied by 10 to fit the graph scale. Error bars represent ±1 standard error of the mean.
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fig1-2167702614527433: Mean frequency of film-related intrusive images reported via short messaging service (SMS) prompts, intrusive images triggered by the Intrusion Provocation Task (IPT), and Impact of Event Scale–Revised Total Score (IES-R) for high Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ; n = 50) and low MDQ groups (n = 60). The IES-R is multiplied by 10 to fit the graph scale. Error bars represent ±1 standard error of the mean.

Mentions: Key to predictions, the high MDQ group had significantly more frequent intrusive images than the low MDQ group, as reported via SMS over the 6 days, with almost double the mean number (Table 2 and Fig. 1).


Hypomanic Experience in Young Adults Confers Vulnerability to Intrusive Imagery After Experimental Trauma: Relevance for Bipolar Disorder.

Malik A, Goodwin GM, Hoppitt L, Holmes EA - Clin Psychol Sci (2014)

Mean frequency of film-related intrusive images reported via short messaging service (SMS) prompts, intrusive images triggered by the Intrusion Provocation Task (IPT), and Impact of Event Scale–Revised Total Score (IES-R) for high Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ; n = 50) and low MDQ groups (n = 60). The IES-R is multiplied by 10 to fit the graph scale. Error bars represent ±1 standard error of the mean.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230964&req=5

fig1-2167702614527433: Mean frequency of film-related intrusive images reported via short messaging service (SMS) prompts, intrusive images triggered by the Intrusion Provocation Task (IPT), and Impact of Event Scale–Revised Total Score (IES-R) for high Mood Disorder Questionnaire (MDQ; n = 50) and low MDQ groups (n = 60). The IES-R is multiplied by 10 to fit the graph scale. Error bars represent ±1 standard error of the mean.
Mentions: Key to predictions, the high MDQ group had significantly more frequent intrusive images than the low MDQ group, as reported via SMS over the 6 days, with almost double the mean number (Table 2 and Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: The current study assessed, prospectively, whether significant hypomanic experience (contrasting groups scoring high vs. low on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire, MDQ) places individuals at increased risk of visual reexperiencing after experimental stress.Findings suggest hypomanic experience is associated with developing more frequent intrusive imagery of a stressor.Because mental imagery powerfully affects emotion, such imagery may contribute to bipolar mood instability and offer a cognitive treatment target.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Oxford.

ABSTRACT
Emotional mental imagery occurs across anxiety disorders, yet is neglected in bipolar disorder despite high anxiety comorbidity. Furthermore, a heightened susceptibility to developing intrusive mental images of stressful events in bipolar disorder and people vulnerable to it (with hypomanic experience) has been suggested. The current study assessed, prospectively, whether significant hypomanic experience (contrasting groups scoring high vs. low on the Mood Disorder Questionnaire, MDQ) places individuals at increased risk of visual reexperiencing after experimental stress. A total of 110 young adults watched a trauma film and recorded film-related intrusive images for 6 days. Compared to the low MDQ group, the high MDQ group experienced approximately twice as many intrusive images, substantiated by convergent measures. Findings suggest hypomanic experience is associated with developing more frequent intrusive imagery of a stressor. Because mental imagery powerfully affects emotion, such imagery may contribute to bipolar mood instability and offer a cognitive treatment target.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus