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Roofed grooves: rapid layer engineering of perfusion channels in collagen tissue models.

Tan NS, Alekseeva T, Brown RA - J Biomater Appl (2014)

Bottom Line: In the second part, this was used for effective fabrication of multi-layered plastically compressed collagen constructs with internal channels by roofing the grooves with a second layer.Resulting µ-channels retained their dimensions and were stable over time in culture with fibroblasts and could be cell seeded with a lining layer by simple transfer of epithelial cells.The results of this study provide a valuable platform for rapid fabrication of complex collagen-based tissues in particular for provision of perfusing microchannels through the bulk material for improved core nutrient supply.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tissue Repair & Engineering Centre, Institute of Orthopaedics, University College London, United Kingdom.

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Once the rectangular profile groove had been formed in the first layer of compressed collagen a second layer was set over the top and it too was compressed in its turn, to produce a flat ‘roof’ to the groove, forming a closed channel. Representative histological images of these open channels are shown in pair (a), (b) (c) (transverse view, Sirius Red staining). Both the moulded and roofing layers were set as 10.6 mm deep gels. (a) 25 × 75 μm template, (b) 50 × 75 μm template, (c) 100 × 75 μm template. Solid arrows indicate the open area of the channel.
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fig5-0885328214538865: Once the rectangular profile groove had been formed in the first layer of compressed collagen a second layer was set over the top and it too was compressed in its turn, to produce a flat ‘roof’ to the groove, forming a closed channel. Representative histological images of these open channels are shown in pair (a), (b) (c) (transverse view, Sirius Red staining). Both the moulded and roofing layers were set as 10.6 mm deep gels. (a) 25 × 75 μm template, (b) 50 × 75 μm template, (c) 100 × 75 μm template. Solid arrows indicate the open area of the channel.

Mentions: Once the pattern of collagen fibril deposition and micro-moulded groove formation was understood it was possible to develop a layer fabrication technique (bio-lamination) for producing continuous channels, running through the bulk collagen material. This was achieved by adding a second layer of collagen gel over the first, grooved surface to ‘roof’ the ‘groove’ and convert it into a channel. Figure 5 shows the result of this roofing step. In all the test groove sizes used here, the initial groove remained intact and did not fill with collagen solution, which initially seemed probable. Hence the grooved surfaces were converted by a simple, rapid lamination step into patent channels, suitable for the groove widths used here.Figure 5.


Roofed grooves: rapid layer engineering of perfusion channels in collagen tissue models.

Tan NS, Alekseeva T, Brown RA - J Biomater Appl (2014)

Once the rectangular profile groove had been formed in the first layer of compressed collagen a second layer was set over the top and it too was compressed in its turn, to produce a flat ‘roof’ to the groove, forming a closed channel. Representative histological images of these open channels are shown in pair (a), (b) (c) (transverse view, Sirius Red staining). Both the moulded and roofing layers were set as 10.6 mm deep gels. (a) 25 × 75 μm template, (b) 50 × 75 μm template, (c) 100 × 75 μm template. Solid arrows indicate the open area of the channel.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230962&req=5

fig5-0885328214538865: Once the rectangular profile groove had been formed in the first layer of compressed collagen a second layer was set over the top and it too was compressed in its turn, to produce a flat ‘roof’ to the groove, forming a closed channel. Representative histological images of these open channels are shown in pair (a), (b) (c) (transverse view, Sirius Red staining). Both the moulded and roofing layers were set as 10.6 mm deep gels. (a) 25 × 75 μm template, (b) 50 × 75 μm template, (c) 100 × 75 μm template. Solid arrows indicate the open area of the channel.
Mentions: Once the pattern of collagen fibril deposition and micro-moulded groove formation was understood it was possible to develop a layer fabrication technique (bio-lamination) for producing continuous channels, running through the bulk collagen material. This was achieved by adding a second layer of collagen gel over the first, grooved surface to ‘roof’ the ‘groove’ and convert it into a channel. Figure 5 shows the result of this roofing step. In all the test groove sizes used here, the initial groove remained intact and did not fill with collagen solution, which initially seemed probable. Hence the grooved surfaces were converted by a simple, rapid lamination step into patent channels, suitable for the groove widths used here.Figure 5.

Bottom Line: In the second part, this was used for effective fabrication of multi-layered plastically compressed collagen constructs with internal channels by roofing the grooves with a second layer.Resulting µ-channels retained their dimensions and were stable over time in culture with fibroblasts and could be cell seeded with a lining layer by simple transfer of epithelial cells.The results of this study provide a valuable platform for rapid fabrication of complex collagen-based tissues in particular for provision of perfusing microchannels through the bulk material for improved core nutrient supply.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tissue Repair & Engineering Centre, Institute of Orthopaedics, University College London, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH