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Roofed grooves: rapid layer engineering of perfusion channels in collagen tissue models.

Tan NS, Alekseeva T, Brown RA - J Biomater Appl (2014)

Bottom Line: In the second part, this was used for effective fabrication of multi-layered plastically compressed collagen constructs with internal channels by roofing the grooves with a second layer.Resulting µ-channels retained their dimensions and were stable over time in culture with fibroblasts and could be cell seeded with a lining layer by simple transfer of epithelial cells.The results of this study provide a valuable platform for rapid fabrication of complex collagen-based tissues in particular for provision of perfusing microchannels through the bulk material for improved core nutrient supply.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tissue Repair & Engineering Centre, Institute of Orthopaedics, University College London, United Kingdom.

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Density scans along the length of plain (a) and micro-moulded FLS surfaces using (b) round and (c) rectangular cross-section templates. In each section (a, b and c), panel (i) shows a representative micrograph and the track of scans made across the collagen layer and panel (ii) shows the graph of collagen density along the FLS. In all cases the arrow heads indicate positions of high collagen density. The inset graphs show the mean percentage increase in intensity of grooved regions (relative to collagen density in the non-groove area). b(ii): Plot of mean percentage intensity increase for round grooves (n = 7). c(ii): Plot of mean percentage intensity increase for rectangular grooves (N = 8). *P < 0.05 Groove base compared to the baselines in b(ii), and corners compared to the baseline in c(ii).
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fig3-0885328214538865: Density scans along the length of plain (a) and micro-moulded FLS surfaces using (b) round and (c) rectangular cross-section templates. In each section (a, b and c), panel (i) shows a representative micrograph and the track of scans made across the collagen layer and panel (ii) shows the graph of collagen density along the FLS. In all cases the arrow heads indicate positions of high collagen density. The inset graphs show the mean percentage increase in intensity of grooved regions (relative to collagen density in the non-groove area). b(ii): Plot of mean percentage intensity increase for round grooves (n = 7). c(ii): Plot of mean percentage intensity increase for rectangular grooves (N = 8). *P < 0.05 Groove base compared to the baselines in b(ii), and corners compared to the baseline in c(ii).

Mentions: Collagen distribution in the micro-moulded constructs was assessed by converting images to grey scale and inverted to give images with collagen in white against a black background. Using straight line measurements (line width: 20, line length: at least half the thickness of the construct), vertical parallel lines were drawn spanning from at least 50 µm on one side of a groove to at least 50 µm from the groove of the other side. These straight lines each represented an individual ROI. The mean pixel intensities of each ROI were measured using the multi-measure function in ImageJ and plotted against corresponding ROI position along the construct (Figure 3).


Roofed grooves: rapid layer engineering of perfusion channels in collagen tissue models.

Tan NS, Alekseeva T, Brown RA - J Biomater Appl (2014)

Density scans along the length of plain (a) and micro-moulded FLS surfaces using (b) round and (c) rectangular cross-section templates. In each section (a, b and c), panel (i) shows a representative micrograph and the track of scans made across the collagen layer and panel (ii) shows the graph of collagen density along the FLS. In all cases the arrow heads indicate positions of high collagen density. The inset graphs show the mean percentage increase in intensity of grooved regions (relative to collagen density in the non-groove area). b(ii): Plot of mean percentage intensity increase for round grooves (n = 7). c(ii): Plot of mean percentage intensity increase for rectangular grooves (N = 8). *P < 0.05 Groove base compared to the baselines in b(ii), and corners compared to the baseline in c(ii).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230962&req=5

fig3-0885328214538865: Density scans along the length of plain (a) and micro-moulded FLS surfaces using (b) round and (c) rectangular cross-section templates. In each section (a, b and c), panel (i) shows a representative micrograph and the track of scans made across the collagen layer and panel (ii) shows the graph of collagen density along the FLS. In all cases the arrow heads indicate positions of high collagen density. The inset graphs show the mean percentage increase in intensity of grooved regions (relative to collagen density in the non-groove area). b(ii): Plot of mean percentage intensity increase for round grooves (n = 7). c(ii): Plot of mean percentage intensity increase for rectangular grooves (N = 8). *P < 0.05 Groove base compared to the baselines in b(ii), and corners compared to the baseline in c(ii).
Mentions: Collagen distribution in the micro-moulded constructs was assessed by converting images to grey scale and inverted to give images with collagen in white against a black background. Using straight line measurements (line width: 20, line length: at least half the thickness of the construct), vertical parallel lines were drawn spanning from at least 50 µm on one side of a groove to at least 50 µm from the groove of the other side. These straight lines each represented an individual ROI. The mean pixel intensities of each ROI were measured using the multi-measure function in ImageJ and plotted against corresponding ROI position along the construct (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: In the second part, this was used for effective fabrication of multi-layered plastically compressed collagen constructs with internal channels by roofing the grooves with a second layer.Resulting µ-channels retained their dimensions and were stable over time in culture with fibroblasts and could be cell seeded with a lining layer by simple transfer of epithelial cells.The results of this study provide a valuable platform for rapid fabrication of complex collagen-based tissues in particular for provision of perfusing microchannels through the bulk material for improved core nutrient supply.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tissue Repair & Engineering Centre, Institute of Orthopaedics, University College London, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH