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Roofed grooves: rapid layer engineering of perfusion channels in collagen tissue models.

Tan NS, Alekseeva T, Brown RA - J Biomater Appl (2014)

Bottom Line: In the second part, this was used for effective fabrication of multi-layered plastically compressed collagen constructs with internal channels by roofing the grooves with a second layer.Resulting µ-channels retained their dimensions and were stable over time in culture with fibroblasts and could be cell seeded with a lining layer by simple transfer of epithelial cells.The results of this study provide a valuable platform for rapid fabrication of complex collagen-based tissues in particular for provision of perfusing microchannels through the bulk material for improved core nutrient supply.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tissue Repair & Engineering Centre, Institute of Orthopaedics, University College London, United Kingdom.

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(a) Image analysis of an unpatterned PC scaffold, showing the stained section with -x-scanning-track line (i), with 3D and linear density scan plots (ii), (iii). (b) Similar stained section (i), 3D (ii) and linear (iii) plots through the collagen below a 100 µm embossed groove. (Inset) SEM micrograph showing the surface appearance of a micro-moulded (arrowed) groove produced with a 200 μm diameter stainless steel wire.
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fig2-0885328214538865: (a) Image analysis of an unpatterned PC scaffold, showing the stained section with -x-scanning-track line (i), with 3D and linear density scan plots (ii), (iii). (b) Similar stained section (i), 3D (ii) and linear (iii) plots through the collagen below a 100 µm embossed groove. (Inset) SEM micrograph showing the surface appearance of a micro-moulded (arrowed) groove produced with a 200 μm diameter stainless steel wire.

Mentions: Figure 2(a) shows a typical analysis of collagen within a highly compacted FLS. The micrograph shows a thin PC collagen layer (around 50 µm), indicating the dense FLS at the gel top. Note the use of thin initial gels (<5.3 mm deep) was essential for this degree of asymmetry. Thicker (or ‘deeper’) pre-compression gels formed a secondary FLS on this opposite, basal surface, due to reversal of the fluid outflow part way through compression. The transverse x-line in Figure 2(a) and (b) indicates the scanning track used during image analysis to produce the density trace in (iii) and 3D map in (ii). In this case, (no embossing template) the extent and micro-localisation of dense FLS collagen accumulation is clearly evident (incidentally, indicating why fluid outflow falls off by this stage of compression). For comparison a similar scan is shown for a construct embossed using a circular cross-section, wire template (100 µm diameter, Figure 2(b)).Figure 2.


Roofed grooves: rapid layer engineering of perfusion channels in collagen tissue models.

Tan NS, Alekseeva T, Brown RA - J Biomater Appl (2014)

(a) Image analysis of an unpatterned PC scaffold, showing the stained section with -x-scanning-track line (i), with 3D and linear density scan plots (ii), (iii). (b) Similar stained section (i), 3D (ii) and linear (iii) plots through the collagen below a 100 µm embossed groove. (Inset) SEM micrograph showing the surface appearance of a micro-moulded (arrowed) groove produced with a 200 μm diameter stainless steel wire.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230962&req=5

fig2-0885328214538865: (a) Image analysis of an unpatterned PC scaffold, showing the stained section with -x-scanning-track line (i), with 3D and linear density scan plots (ii), (iii). (b) Similar stained section (i), 3D (ii) and linear (iii) plots through the collagen below a 100 µm embossed groove. (Inset) SEM micrograph showing the surface appearance of a micro-moulded (arrowed) groove produced with a 200 μm diameter stainless steel wire.
Mentions: Figure 2(a) shows a typical analysis of collagen within a highly compacted FLS. The micrograph shows a thin PC collagen layer (around 50 µm), indicating the dense FLS at the gel top. Note the use of thin initial gels (<5.3 mm deep) was essential for this degree of asymmetry. Thicker (or ‘deeper’) pre-compression gels formed a secondary FLS on this opposite, basal surface, due to reversal of the fluid outflow part way through compression. The transverse x-line in Figure 2(a) and (b) indicates the scanning track used during image analysis to produce the density trace in (iii) and 3D map in (ii). In this case, (no embossing template) the extent and micro-localisation of dense FLS collagen accumulation is clearly evident (incidentally, indicating why fluid outflow falls off by this stage of compression). For comparison a similar scan is shown for a construct embossed using a circular cross-section, wire template (100 µm diameter, Figure 2(b)).Figure 2.

Bottom Line: In the second part, this was used for effective fabrication of multi-layered plastically compressed collagen constructs with internal channels by roofing the grooves with a second layer.Resulting µ-channels retained their dimensions and were stable over time in culture with fibroblasts and could be cell seeded with a lining layer by simple transfer of epithelial cells.The results of this study provide a valuable platform for rapid fabrication of complex collagen-based tissues in particular for provision of perfusing microchannels through the bulk material for improved core nutrient supply.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Tissue Repair & Engineering Centre, Institute of Orthopaedics, University College London, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH