Limits...
Coryphoid palm leaf fossils from the Maastrichtian-Danian of Central India with remarks on phytogeography of the Coryphoideae (Arecaceae).

Srivastava R, Srivastava G, Dilcher DL - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The specimens are compared with modern and fossil taxa of the family Arecaceae.The fossil record of coryphoid palm leaves presented here and reported from the Eurasian localities suggests that this is the oldest record of coryphoid palm leaves from India and also from the Gondwana- derived continents suggesting that the coryphoid palms were well established and wide spread on both northern and southern hemispheres by the Maastrichtian-Danian.The coryphoid palms probably dispersed into India from Europe via Africa during the latest Cretaceous long before the Indian Plate collided with the Eurasian Plate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cenozoic Palaeoflorist Laboratory, Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, 53 University Road, Lucknow- 226 007, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Premise of research: A large number of fossil coryphoid palm wood and fruits have been reported from the Deccan Intertrappean beds of India. We document the oldest well-preserved and very rare costapalmate palm leaves and inflorescence like structures from the same horizon.

Methodology: A number of specimens were collected from Maastrichtian-Danian sediments of the Deccan Intertrappean beds, Ghughua, near Umaria, Dindori District, Madhya Pradesh, India. The specimens are compared with modern and fossil taxa of the family Arecaceae.

Pivotal results: Sabalites dindoriensis sp. nov. is described based on fossil leaf specimens including basal to apical parts. These are the oldest coryphoid fossil palm leaves from India as well as, at the time of deposition, from the Gondwana- derived continents.

Conclusions: The fossil record of coryphoid palm leaves presented here and reported from the Eurasian localities suggests that this is the oldest record of coryphoid palm leaves from India and also from the Gondwana- derived continents suggesting that the coryphoid palms were well established and wide spread on both northern and southern hemispheres by the Maastrichtian-Danian. The coryphoid palms probably dispersed into India from Europe via Africa during the latest Cretaceous long before the Indian Plate collided with the Eurasian Plate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of India showing fossil locality.A. Map of India showing extent of Deccan traps. B. High resolution map showing the fossil locality (marked by asterisk) [95].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230940&req=5

pone-0111738-g002: Map of India showing fossil locality.A. Map of India showing extent of Deccan traps. B. High resolution map showing the fossil locality (marked by asterisk) [95].

Mentions: The Deccan Traps (Continental Flood Basalt) are one of the largest igneous provinces of the world. The area occupied by the Deccan Traps today is about 500,000 sq km in peninsular India which includes Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra (Fig. 2A). The original stretch may have been over 1.5 million sq km including sediments found in the Arabian Sea to the west of Mumbai [22]. The outpouring of magma/lava was associated with the northward voyage of the Indian Plate after it was separated from Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous and moved over the Reunion Hot Spot situated east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean [23], [24]. The extensive volcanic eruptions with associated magma and lava outpouring that formed the Deccan Traps and associated sedimentary beds has been difficult to date and thus is an active topic of discussion among geologists and palaeontologists. Recent studies based on 40Ar/39Ar dating indicate that the duration of the volcanism extended from 69–61 Ma and the major eruptions took place between 67–65 Ma [25], [26] rather than a short duration of only one million years [27].


Coryphoid palm leaf fossils from the Maastrichtian-Danian of Central India with remarks on phytogeography of the Coryphoideae (Arecaceae).

Srivastava R, Srivastava G, Dilcher DL - PLoS ONE (2014)

Map of India showing fossil locality.A. Map of India showing extent of Deccan traps. B. High resolution map showing the fossil locality (marked by asterisk) [95].
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230940&req=5

pone-0111738-g002: Map of India showing fossil locality.A. Map of India showing extent of Deccan traps. B. High resolution map showing the fossil locality (marked by asterisk) [95].
Mentions: The Deccan Traps (Continental Flood Basalt) are one of the largest igneous provinces of the world. The area occupied by the Deccan Traps today is about 500,000 sq km in peninsular India which includes Andhra Pradesh, Gujarat, Karnataka, Madhya Pradesh and Maharashtra (Fig. 2A). The original stretch may have been over 1.5 million sq km including sediments found in the Arabian Sea to the west of Mumbai [22]. The outpouring of magma/lava was associated with the northward voyage of the Indian Plate after it was separated from Gondwana during the Early Cretaceous and moved over the Reunion Hot Spot situated east of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean [23], [24]. The extensive volcanic eruptions with associated magma and lava outpouring that formed the Deccan Traps and associated sedimentary beds has been difficult to date and thus is an active topic of discussion among geologists and palaeontologists. Recent studies based on 40Ar/39Ar dating indicate that the duration of the volcanism extended from 69–61 Ma and the major eruptions took place between 67–65 Ma [25], [26] rather than a short duration of only one million years [27].

Bottom Line: The specimens are compared with modern and fossil taxa of the family Arecaceae.The fossil record of coryphoid palm leaves presented here and reported from the Eurasian localities suggests that this is the oldest record of coryphoid palm leaves from India and also from the Gondwana- derived continents suggesting that the coryphoid palms were well established and wide spread on both northern and southern hemispheres by the Maastrichtian-Danian.The coryphoid palms probably dispersed into India from Europe via Africa during the latest Cretaceous long before the Indian Plate collided with the Eurasian Plate.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cenozoic Palaeoflorist Laboratory, Birbal Sahni Institute of Palaeobotany, 53 University Road, Lucknow- 226 007, Uttar Pradesh, India.

ABSTRACT

Premise of research: A large number of fossil coryphoid palm wood and fruits have been reported from the Deccan Intertrappean beds of India. We document the oldest well-preserved and very rare costapalmate palm leaves and inflorescence like structures from the same horizon.

Methodology: A number of specimens were collected from Maastrichtian-Danian sediments of the Deccan Intertrappean beds, Ghughua, near Umaria, Dindori District, Madhya Pradesh, India. The specimens are compared with modern and fossil taxa of the family Arecaceae.

Pivotal results: Sabalites dindoriensis sp. nov. is described based on fossil leaf specimens including basal to apical parts. These are the oldest coryphoid fossil palm leaves from India as well as, at the time of deposition, from the Gondwana- derived continents.

Conclusions: The fossil record of coryphoid palm leaves presented here and reported from the Eurasian localities suggests that this is the oldest record of coryphoid palm leaves from India and also from the Gondwana- derived continents suggesting that the coryphoid palms were well established and wide spread on both northern and southern hemispheres by the Maastrichtian-Danian. The coryphoid palms probably dispersed into India from Europe via Africa during the latest Cretaceous long before the Indian Plate collided with the Eurasian Plate.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus