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Expression of CNPY2 in mouse tissues: quantification and localization.

Hatta K, Guo J, Ludke A, Dhingra S, Singh K, Huang ML, Weisel RD, Li RK - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: CNPY2 was also detectable in mouse blood and human and mouse uteri.These data demonstrate CNPY2 is widely distributed in tissues and suggest the protein has biological functions that have yet to be identified.Using these new observations we discuss possible functions of the protein.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Canopy FGF signaling regulator 2 (CNPY2) is a FGF21-modulated protein containing a saposin B-type domain. In vitro studies have shown CNPY2 is able to enhance neurite outgrowth in neurons and stabilize the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor in macrophages and hepatocytes. However, no in vivo data are available on the normal expression of CNPY2 and information is lacking on which cell types express this protein in tissues. To address this, the present study examined CNPY2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Quantitative PCR and ELISA examination of mouse tissues showed that CNPY2 varies between organs, with the highest expression in the heart, lung and liver. Immunohistochemistry detected CNPY2 in a variety of cell types including skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle myocytes, endothelial cells and epithelial cells. CNPY2 was also detectable in mouse blood and human and mouse uteri. These data demonstrate CNPY2 is widely distributed in tissues and suggest the protein has biological functions that have yet to be identified. Using these new observations we discuss possible functions of the protein.

No MeSH data available.


CNPY2 mRNA is highly expressed in lung, heart and liver.Real-time PCR analysis was used to quantify CNPY2 gene expression in mouse tissues (n = 3). The gene expression of beta-actin was used as a reference control to normalize expression.
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pone-0111370-g001: CNPY2 mRNA is highly expressed in lung, heart and liver.Real-time PCR analysis was used to quantify CNPY2 gene expression in mouse tissues (n = 3). The gene expression of beta-actin was used as a reference control to normalize expression.

Mentions: Quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the expression level of mouse CNPY2 in 14 tissues. CNPY2 transcript was detectable in brain, lung, heart, skeletal muscle, spleen, kidney, bladder, liver, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, testis, uterus and ovary. As shown in Figure 1, CNPY2 was highly enriched in the lung, heart, and liver compared to other organs. The data shown in Figure 1 was normalized to beta-actin. When this data was repeated using GAPDH as a control, the expression profile was very similar (data not shown), with the highest expression levels found in lung, heart and liver.


Expression of CNPY2 in mouse tissues: quantification and localization.

Hatta K, Guo J, Ludke A, Dhingra S, Singh K, Huang ML, Weisel RD, Li RK - PLoS ONE (2014)

CNPY2 mRNA is highly expressed in lung, heart and liver.Real-time PCR analysis was used to quantify CNPY2 gene expression in mouse tissues (n = 3). The gene expression of beta-actin was used as a reference control to normalize expression.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230931&req=5

pone-0111370-g001: CNPY2 mRNA is highly expressed in lung, heart and liver.Real-time PCR analysis was used to quantify CNPY2 gene expression in mouse tissues (n = 3). The gene expression of beta-actin was used as a reference control to normalize expression.
Mentions: Quantitative real-time PCR was used to quantify the expression level of mouse CNPY2 in 14 tissues. CNPY2 transcript was detectable in brain, lung, heart, skeletal muscle, spleen, kidney, bladder, liver, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, testis, uterus and ovary. As shown in Figure 1, CNPY2 was highly enriched in the lung, heart, and liver compared to other organs. The data shown in Figure 1 was normalized to beta-actin. When this data was repeated using GAPDH as a control, the expression profile was very similar (data not shown), with the highest expression levels found in lung, heart and liver.

Bottom Line: CNPY2 was also detectable in mouse blood and human and mouse uteri.These data demonstrate CNPY2 is widely distributed in tissues and suggest the protein has biological functions that have yet to be identified.Using these new observations we discuss possible functions of the protein.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cardiovascular Surgery, Toronto General Research Institute, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario, Canada; Institute of Medical Sciences, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Canopy FGF signaling regulator 2 (CNPY2) is a FGF21-modulated protein containing a saposin B-type domain. In vitro studies have shown CNPY2 is able to enhance neurite outgrowth in neurons and stabilize the expression of low density lipoprotein receptor in macrophages and hepatocytes. However, no in vivo data are available on the normal expression of CNPY2 and information is lacking on which cell types express this protein in tissues. To address this, the present study examined CNPY2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels. Quantitative PCR and ELISA examination of mouse tissues showed that CNPY2 varies between organs, with the highest expression in the heart, lung and liver. Immunohistochemistry detected CNPY2 in a variety of cell types including skeletal, cardiac and smooth muscle myocytes, endothelial cells and epithelial cells. CNPY2 was also detectable in mouse blood and human and mouse uteri. These data demonstrate CNPY2 is widely distributed in tissues and suggest the protein has biological functions that have yet to be identified. Using these new observations we discuss possible functions of the protein.

No MeSH data available.