Limits...
Urbanization increases Aedes albopictus larval habitats and accelerates mosquito development and survivorship.

Li Y, Kamara F, Zhou G, Puthiyakunnon S, Li C, Liu Y, Zhou Y, Yao L, Yan G, Chen XG - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

Bottom Line: Densities in the larval stages varied among the areas, but the urban area had almost two-fold higher densities in pupae and three-fold higher in adult populations compared with the suburban and rural areas.Study regions, surface area, water depth, water clearance, surface type, and canopy coverage were important factors associated with the presence of Ae. albopictus larvae.Urbanization substantially increased the density, larval development rate, and adult survival time of Ae. albopictus, which in turn potentially increased the vector capacity, and therefore, disease transmissibility.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Prevention and Control for Emerging Infectious Diseases of Guangdong Higher Institutes, Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Aedes albopictus is a very invasive and aggressive insect vector that causes outbreaks of dengue fever, chikungunya disease, and yellow fever in many countries. Vector ecology and disease epidemiology are strongly affected by environmental changes. Urbanization is a worldwide trend and is one of the most ecologically modifying phenomena. The purpose of this study is to determine how environmental changes due to urbanization affect the ecology of Aedes albopictus.

Methods: Aquatic habitats and Aedes albopictus larval population surveys were conducted from May to November 2013 in three areas representing rural, suburban, and urban settings in Guangzhou, China. Ae. albopictus adults were collected monthly using BG-Sentinel traps. Ae. albopictus larva and adult life-table experiments were conducted with 20 replicates in each of the three study areas.

Results: The urban area had the highest and the rural area had the lowest number of aquatic habitats that tested positive for Ae. albopictus larvae. Densities in the larval stages varied among the areas, but the urban area had almost two-fold higher densities in pupae and three-fold higher in adult populations compared with the suburban and rural areas. Larvae developed faster and the adult emergence rate was higher in the urban area than in suburban and rural areas. The survival time of adult mosquitoes was also longer in the urban area than it was in suburban and rural areas. Study regions, surface area, water depth, water clearance, surface type, and canopy coverage were important factors associated with the presence of Ae. albopictus larvae.

Conclusions: Urbanization substantially increased the density, larval development rate, and adult survival time of Ae. albopictus, which in turn potentially increased the vector capacity, and therefore, disease transmissibility. Mosquito ecology and its correlation with dengue virus transmission should be compared in different environmental settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Survivorship curve of adult Aedes albopictus in different seasons.The left panel is for August to September, and the right panel is for October and November. The top panel (A and B) is for male, and the bottom panel (C and D) is for female.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230920&req=5

pntd-0003301-g006: Survivorship curve of adult Aedes albopictus in different seasons.The left panel is for August to September, and the right panel is for October and November. The top panel (A and B) is for male, and the bottom panel (C and D) is for female.

Mentions: From August to September, the life span of female adult mosquito was significantly longer in urban areas than that in suburban and rural areas, but the difference in median survival time between suburban and rural areas was insignificant (Figure 6, Table S2). Adult male mosquito survival time was significantly different among study sites (χ2 = 17.4, d.f. = 2, P<0.001). Male survival time was longest in the suburban area and shortest in the rural area (Figure 6, Table S2). The average outdoor temperatures in urban (29.4±1.7°C) and suburban areas (29.2±0.9°C) were significantly higher than that in rural areas (28.1±1.8°C) (F = 5.4, d.f. = 2, 106, P = 0.0016) (Table S2). Relative humidity were significantly different among rural (87.5±9.4%), urban (82.1±11.1%), and suburban areas (75.9±7.6%) (F = 10.5, d.f. = 2, 106, P<0.001) (Table S2). The mean daily survival rates were similar in all study sites and similar between males and females (Tukey HSD test, all P>0.05) (Table S2). Survival curves were similar in females between urban and suburban areas but different from those in rural areas (Figure 6C and 6D).


Urbanization increases Aedes albopictus larval habitats and accelerates mosquito development and survivorship.

Li Y, Kamara F, Zhou G, Puthiyakunnon S, Li C, Liu Y, Zhou Y, Yao L, Yan G, Chen XG - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

Survivorship curve of adult Aedes albopictus in different seasons.The left panel is for August to September, and the right panel is for October and November. The top panel (A and B) is for male, and the bottom panel (C and D) is for female.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230920&req=5

pntd-0003301-g006: Survivorship curve of adult Aedes albopictus in different seasons.The left panel is for August to September, and the right panel is for October and November. The top panel (A and B) is for male, and the bottom panel (C and D) is for female.
Mentions: From August to September, the life span of female adult mosquito was significantly longer in urban areas than that in suburban and rural areas, but the difference in median survival time between suburban and rural areas was insignificant (Figure 6, Table S2). Adult male mosquito survival time was significantly different among study sites (χ2 = 17.4, d.f. = 2, P<0.001). Male survival time was longest in the suburban area and shortest in the rural area (Figure 6, Table S2). The average outdoor temperatures in urban (29.4±1.7°C) and suburban areas (29.2±0.9°C) were significantly higher than that in rural areas (28.1±1.8°C) (F = 5.4, d.f. = 2, 106, P = 0.0016) (Table S2). Relative humidity were significantly different among rural (87.5±9.4%), urban (82.1±11.1%), and suburban areas (75.9±7.6%) (F = 10.5, d.f. = 2, 106, P<0.001) (Table S2). The mean daily survival rates were similar in all study sites and similar between males and females (Tukey HSD test, all P>0.05) (Table S2). Survival curves were similar in females between urban and suburban areas but different from those in rural areas (Figure 6C and 6D).

Bottom Line: Densities in the larval stages varied among the areas, but the urban area had almost two-fold higher densities in pupae and three-fold higher in adult populations compared with the suburban and rural areas.Study regions, surface area, water depth, water clearance, surface type, and canopy coverage were important factors associated with the presence of Ae. albopictus larvae.Urbanization substantially increased the density, larval development rate, and adult survival time of Ae. albopictus, which in turn potentially increased the vector capacity, and therefore, disease transmissibility.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Prevention and Control for Emerging Infectious Diseases of Guangdong Higher Institutes, Department of Pathogen Biology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, China.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Aedes albopictus is a very invasive and aggressive insect vector that causes outbreaks of dengue fever, chikungunya disease, and yellow fever in many countries. Vector ecology and disease epidemiology are strongly affected by environmental changes. Urbanization is a worldwide trend and is one of the most ecologically modifying phenomena. The purpose of this study is to determine how environmental changes due to urbanization affect the ecology of Aedes albopictus.

Methods: Aquatic habitats and Aedes albopictus larval population surveys were conducted from May to November 2013 in three areas representing rural, suburban, and urban settings in Guangzhou, China. Ae. albopictus adults were collected monthly using BG-Sentinel traps. Ae. albopictus larva and adult life-table experiments were conducted with 20 replicates in each of the three study areas.

Results: The urban area had the highest and the rural area had the lowest number of aquatic habitats that tested positive for Ae. albopictus larvae. Densities in the larval stages varied among the areas, but the urban area had almost two-fold higher densities in pupae and three-fold higher in adult populations compared with the suburban and rural areas. Larvae developed faster and the adult emergence rate was higher in the urban area than in suburban and rural areas. The survival time of adult mosquitoes was also longer in the urban area than it was in suburban and rural areas. Study regions, surface area, water depth, water clearance, surface type, and canopy coverage were important factors associated with the presence of Ae. albopictus larvae.

Conclusions: Urbanization substantially increased the density, larval development rate, and adult survival time of Ae. albopictus, which in turn potentially increased the vector capacity, and therefore, disease transmissibility. Mosquito ecology and its correlation with dengue virus transmission should be compared in different environmental settings.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus