Limits...
The urinary cytokine/chemokine signature of renal hyperfiltration in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

Har RL, Reich HN, Scholey JW, Daneman D, Dunger DB, Moineddin R, Dalton RN, Motran L, Elia Y, Deda L, Ostrovsky M, Sochett EB, Mahmud FH, Cherney DZ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: Only serum IL-2 significantly differed between HC and T1D (p = 0.0076).Hyperfiltration is associated with increased urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion in T1D adolescents, and parallel trends in serum cytokine concentration.The GFR-associated trends in cytokine excretion may be driven by the effects of ambient hyperglycemia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Nephrology, University Health Network - Toronto General Hospital, Banting and Best Diabetes Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Urinary cytokine/chemokine levels are elevated in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) exhibiting renal hyperfiltration. Whether this observation extends to adolescents with T1D remains unknown. Our first objective was to determine the relationship between hyperfiltration and urinary cytokines/chemokines in normotensive, normoalbuminuric adolescents with T1D using GFR(cystatin). Our second aim was to determine the relationship between urine and plasma levels of inflammatory biomarkers, to clarify the origin of these factors.

Methods: Urine and serum cytokines/chemokines (Luminex platform) and GFR(cystatin) were measured in normofiltering (n = 111, T1D-N, GFR<135 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and hyperfiltering (n = 31, T1D-H, GFR ≥ 135 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) adolescents with T1D (ages 10-16), and in age and sex matched healthy control subjects (HC, n = 59).

Results: We noted significant step-wise increases in urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion according to filtration status with highest levels in T1D-H, with parallel trends in serum analyte concentrations. After adjusting for serum glucose at the time of sampling, differences in urinary cytokine excretion were not statistically significant. Only serum IL-2 significantly differed between HC and T1D (p = 0.0076).

Conclusions: Hyperfiltration is associated with increased urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion in T1D adolescents, and parallel trends in serum cytokine concentration. The GFR-associated trends in cytokine excretion may be driven by the effects of ambient hyperglycemia. The relationship between hyperfiltration, glycemia, and variations in serum and urine cytokine expression and their impact on future renal and systemic vascular complications requires further study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Serum Cytokine/Chemokine Signature in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Based on Hyperfiltration Status and Healthy Controls.A parallel trend to urinary excretion of cytokine/chemokines was observed, although only IL-2 showed significance. P-values show pair-wise comparisons with Bonferroni correction, adjusted for age, gender and HbA1c.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230911&req=5

pone-0111131-g002: Serum Cytokine/Chemokine Signature in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Based on Hyperfiltration Status and Healthy Controls.A parallel trend to urinary excretion of cytokine/chemokines was observed, although only IL-2 showed significance. P-values show pair-wise comparisons with Bonferroni correction, adjusted for age, gender and HbA1c.

Mentions: For serum markers, between-group differences for IL-2 in HC vs. T1D-N and T1D-H reached significance (Figure 2), and the addition of ethnicity to the model had no effect. In the continuous analysis comparing serum analyte levels with GFR in the HC group, serum MIP-1α (β = −0.2752, p = 0.0384), MDC (β = −12.702, p = 0.0061), IL-12 (β = −2.1089, p = 0.0237) correlated with GFRcystatin C. In the T1D cohort, correlations were also observed between serum IL-12 (β = 4.0269, p = 0.0029), IFNα2 (β = 15.8123, p = 0.0015), FGF-2 (β = 2.1275, p = 0.0032), TNF-β (β = 21.7215, p = 0.0028), MDC (β = 20.3889, p = 0.0018), GM-CSF (β = 1.1626, p = 0.0029), PDGF-AB/BB (β = 20.0651, p = 0.0232) and GFRcystatin C.


The urinary cytokine/chemokine signature of renal hyperfiltration in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

Har RL, Reich HN, Scholey JW, Daneman D, Dunger DB, Moineddin R, Dalton RN, Motran L, Elia Y, Deda L, Ostrovsky M, Sochett EB, Mahmud FH, Cherney DZ - PLoS ONE (2014)

Serum Cytokine/Chemokine Signature in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Based on Hyperfiltration Status and Healthy Controls.A parallel trend to urinary excretion of cytokine/chemokines was observed, although only IL-2 showed significance. P-values show pair-wise comparisons with Bonferroni correction, adjusted for age, gender and HbA1c.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230911&req=5

pone-0111131-g002: Serum Cytokine/Chemokine Signature in Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Based on Hyperfiltration Status and Healthy Controls.A parallel trend to urinary excretion of cytokine/chemokines was observed, although only IL-2 showed significance. P-values show pair-wise comparisons with Bonferroni correction, adjusted for age, gender and HbA1c.
Mentions: For serum markers, between-group differences for IL-2 in HC vs. T1D-N and T1D-H reached significance (Figure 2), and the addition of ethnicity to the model had no effect. In the continuous analysis comparing serum analyte levels with GFR in the HC group, serum MIP-1α (β = −0.2752, p = 0.0384), MDC (β = −12.702, p = 0.0061), IL-12 (β = −2.1089, p = 0.0237) correlated with GFRcystatin C. In the T1D cohort, correlations were also observed between serum IL-12 (β = 4.0269, p = 0.0029), IFNα2 (β = 15.8123, p = 0.0015), FGF-2 (β = 2.1275, p = 0.0032), TNF-β (β = 21.7215, p = 0.0028), MDC (β = 20.3889, p = 0.0018), GM-CSF (β = 1.1626, p = 0.0029), PDGF-AB/BB (β = 20.0651, p = 0.0232) and GFRcystatin C.

Bottom Line: Only serum IL-2 significantly differed between HC and T1D (p = 0.0076).Hyperfiltration is associated with increased urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion in T1D adolescents, and parallel trends in serum cytokine concentration.The GFR-associated trends in cytokine excretion may be driven by the effects of ambient hyperglycemia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Nephrology, University Health Network - Toronto General Hospital, Banting and Best Diabetes Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Urinary cytokine/chemokine levels are elevated in adults with type 1 diabetes (T1D) exhibiting renal hyperfiltration. Whether this observation extends to adolescents with T1D remains unknown. Our first objective was to determine the relationship between hyperfiltration and urinary cytokines/chemokines in normotensive, normoalbuminuric adolescents with T1D using GFR(cystatin). Our second aim was to determine the relationship between urine and plasma levels of inflammatory biomarkers, to clarify the origin of these factors.

Methods: Urine and serum cytokines/chemokines (Luminex platform) and GFR(cystatin) were measured in normofiltering (n = 111, T1D-N, GFR<135 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) and hyperfiltering (n = 31, T1D-H, GFR ≥ 135 ml/min/1.73 m(2)) adolescents with T1D (ages 10-16), and in age and sex matched healthy control subjects (HC, n = 59).

Results: We noted significant step-wise increases in urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion according to filtration status with highest levels in T1D-H, with parallel trends in serum analyte concentrations. After adjusting for serum glucose at the time of sampling, differences in urinary cytokine excretion were not statistically significant. Only serum IL-2 significantly differed between HC and T1D (p = 0.0076).

Conclusions: Hyperfiltration is associated with increased urinary cytokine/chemokine excretion in T1D adolescents, and parallel trends in serum cytokine concentration. The GFR-associated trends in cytokine excretion may be driven by the effects of ambient hyperglycemia. The relationship between hyperfiltration, glycemia, and variations in serum and urine cytokine expression and their impact on future renal and systemic vascular complications requires further study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus