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Strengthening neglected tropical disease research through enhancing research-site capacity: an evaluation of a novel web application to facilitate research collaborations.

Furtado T, Franzen S, van Loggerenberg F, Carn G, Grahek S, McBride M, Power M, O'Reilly J, Savarese B, Snowden MA, Stevens G, Uys A, Lang T - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Global Health Network, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

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Many research sites have been equipped for one specific trial or disease area, often for a particular sponsor, with little consideration to subsequent diversification or sustainability –... For example, one responder stated that they thought “having an online database would be a great way of finding collaborators,” and another response indicated a need for “a platform to collaborate with stakeholders; [and] wider dissemination of opportunities. ” No such tool or platform has previously existed, meaning that the skills and knowledge of research sites are effectively isolated... A related frustration reported by research sites after a project concludes is the inability to find new studies to work on, meaning that sites often lose their trained staff as soon as their study-specific funding ends... Adapting technology from dating websites, the application allows research sites to have an online presence and automatically suggests research collaborations between research sites and new research studies that have been posted on the site... The application has now been built, pilot-tested, and launched, and it is running successfully... The questionnaire used a mixture of open-ended questions and rating scales to assess the ease of use, concept, need, and technical support of the Site-Finder application... Site-Finder was released formally in July 2013 and has been functioning successfully since then... Twenty studies and 110 research sites have registered (see Figure 1), and user reports of sites contacting one another and of studies making contact with new sites have come: in the past six months, over 35 “contact requests” have been made to sites that are part of Site-Finder as a result of their being on the platform... Furthermore, we have received reports from sites stating other perceived benefits of being a part of Site-Finder, including receiving monthly news about global grant and funding opportunities, and making use of the other resources across the Global Health Network... Situating Site-Finder within the Global Health Network, an existing, widely used community of researchers working in global health, provides distinct advantages... The Global Health Network is also keen to encourage sites to use Site-Finder in other ways, for example, by finding other local sites for shared training days, facilities, local research studies, or organised staff exchanges... The team will also be investigating ways of using Site-Finder to increase locally led research, for example, helping users of Site-Finder to access the other resources available on the Global Health Network for activities such as protocol writing, training staff, and reporting their work... Because it is situated within the infrastructure of the Global Health Network, Site-Finder also allows sites to build their skills and knowledge by accessing the information and peer support that is abundant on the Network... Although at an early stage, initial feedback on Site-Finder is highly positive... This indicates that the web application will successfully link research sites and new projects and succeed in the goal of increasing equity in access to research opportunities.

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Map showing the distribution of 110 research sites as of July 2014.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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pntd-0003225-g001: Map showing the distribution of 110 research sites as of July 2014.

Mentions: During the six-month pilot phase, 52 research sites across 19 developing countries registered with Site-Finder, along with ten research projects seeking sites. The research sites represented great diversity in size and type, including large-scale national research institutes as well as small investigator-led sites at hospitals. Similarly, good diversity was shown in the research studies added: a mix of noncommercial organisations or universities and a range of disease areas and study types. Site-Finder continues to grow post–pilot phase, having received over 6,300 visits from over 3,800 users, across 142 countries (3 June 2014). Twenty studies and 110 research sites have registered (see Figure 1), and user reports of sites contacting one another and of studies making contact with new sites have come: in the past six months, over 35 “contact requests” have been made to sites that are part of Site-Finder as a result of their being on the platform.


Strengthening neglected tropical disease research through enhancing research-site capacity: an evaluation of a novel web application to facilitate research collaborations.

Furtado T, Franzen S, van Loggerenberg F, Carn G, Grahek S, McBride M, Power M, O'Reilly J, Savarese B, Snowden MA, Stevens G, Uys A, Lang T - PLoS Negl Trop Dis (2014)

Map showing the distribution of 110 research sites as of July 2014.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230836&req=5

pntd-0003225-g001: Map showing the distribution of 110 research sites as of July 2014.
Mentions: During the six-month pilot phase, 52 research sites across 19 developing countries registered with Site-Finder, along with ten research projects seeking sites. The research sites represented great diversity in size and type, including large-scale national research institutes as well as small investigator-led sites at hospitals. Similarly, good diversity was shown in the research studies added: a mix of noncommercial organisations or universities and a range of disease areas and study types. Site-Finder continues to grow post–pilot phase, having received over 6,300 visits from over 3,800 users, across 142 countries (3 June 2014). Twenty studies and 110 research sites have registered (see Figure 1), and user reports of sites contacting one another and of studies making contact with new sites have come: in the past six months, over 35 “contact requests” have been made to sites that are part of Site-Finder as a result of their being on the platform.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: The Global Health Network, Centre for Tropical Medicine and Global Health, Nuffield Department of Clinical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom.

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Many research sites have been equipped for one specific trial or disease area, often for a particular sponsor, with little consideration to subsequent diversification or sustainability –... For example, one responder stated that they thought “having an online database would be a great way of finding collaborators,” and another response indicated a need for “a platform to collaborate with stakeholders; [and] wider dissemination of opportunities. ” No such tool or platform has previously existed, meaning that the skills and knowledge of research sites are effectively isolated... A related frustration reported by research sites after a project concludes is the inability to find new studies to work on, meaning that sites often lose their trained staff as soon as their study-specific funding ends... Adapting technology from dating websites, the application allows research sites to have an online presence and automatically suggests research collaborations between research sites and new research studies that have been posted on the site... The application has now been built, pilot-tested, and launched, and it is running successfully... The questionnaire used a mixture of open-ended questions and rating scales to assess the ease of use, concept, need, and technical support of the Site-Finder application... Site-Finder was released formally in July 2013 and has been functioning successfully since then... Twenty studies and 110 research sites have registered (see Figure 1), and user reports of sites contacting one another and of studies making contact with new sites have come: in the past six months, over 35 “contact requests” have been made to sites that are part of Site-Finder as a result of their being on the platform... Furthermore, we have received reports from sites stating other perceived benefits of being a part of Site-Finder, including receiving monthly news about global grant and funding opportunities, and making use of the other resources across the Global Health Network... Situating Site-Finder within the Global Health Network, an existing, widely used community of researchers working in global health, provides distinct advantages... The Global Health Network is also keen to encourage sites to use Site-Finder in other ways, for example, by finding other local sites for shared training days, facilities, local research studies, or organised staff exchanges... The team will also be investigating ways of using Site-Finder to increase locally led research, for example, helping users of Site-Finder to access the other resources available on the Global Health Network for activities such as protocol writing, training staff, and reporting their work... Because it is situated within the infrastructure of the Global Health Network, Site-Finder also allows sites to build their skills and knowledge by accessing the information and peer support that is abundant on the Network... Although at an early stage, initial feedback on Site-Finder is highly positive... This indicates that the web application will successfully link research sites and new projects and succeed in the goal of increasing equity in access to research opportunities.

No MeSH data available.