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Trametes meyenii possesses elevated dye degradation abilities under normal nutritional conditions compared to other white rot fungi.

Chenaux PR, Lalji N, Lefebvre DD - AMB Express (2014)

Bottom Line: Trametes pubescens, T. multicolor, T. meyenii and T. versicolor decoloured amaranth azo-dye best on low-nitrogen agar-solidified media whereas Bjerkandera adusta and Phlebia radiata were most effective in low nitrogen medium supplemented with manganese.This appears to be because of inadequate Mn(3+) chelation required by manganese peroxidase because adding relatively low amounts of malonate enhanced decolouration rates.The ability of Trametes meyenii to simultaneously decolour dye over prolonged periods of time while growing in relatively nutrient-rich medium appears to be unique amongst white-rot fungi, indicating its potential in wastewater bioremediation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston K7L 3 N6, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Several species of white-rot fungi were investigated for their utility in prolonged decolouration of the recalcitrant sulfonated azo dye, amaranth. Trametes pubescens, T. multicolor, T. meyenii and T. versicolor decoloured amaranth azo-dye best on low-nitrogen agar-solidified media whereas Bjerkandera adusta and Phlebia radiata were most effective in low nitrogen medium supplemented with manganese. Trametes cotonea did not decolour effectively under any condition. The decolouring Trametes species were also effective in liquid culture whereas B. adusta and P. radiata were not. Trametes meyenii, T. pubescens and T. multicolor were equal to or better than commonly employed T. versicolor at decolouring amaranth. This is the first study to show the dye decolouration potential of T. meyenii, T. pubescens, and T. multicolor. Supplementing with Mn(II) increased assayable manganese peroxidase activity, but not long-term decolouration, indicating that laccase is the main decolourizing enzyme in these Trametes species. This appears to be because of inadequate Mn(3+) chelation required by manganese peroxidase because adding relatively low amounts of malonate enhanced decolouration rates. The ability of Trametes meyenii to simultaneously decolour dye over prolonged periods of time while growing in relatively nutrient-rich medium appears to be unique amongst white-rot fungi, indicating its potential in wastewater bioremediation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Laccase and MnP activities by 9-day-old cultures in low-N Kirk’s liquid medium.B. adusta(♦), P. radiata (□), T. cotonea (▲), T. meyenii (○), T. pubescens (●), T. multicolor (■), T. versicolor (∆). S.D. always less than 5% (n = 5). B. adusta, P. radiata and T. cotonea all displayed negligible enzyme activities.
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Figure 2: Laccase and MnP activities by 9-day-old cultures in low-N Kirk’s liquid medium.B. adusta(♦), P. radiata (□), T. cotonea (▲), T. meyenii (○), T. pubescens (●), T. multicolor (■), T. versicolor (∆). S.D. always less than 5% (n = 5). B. adusta, P. radiata and T. cotonea all displayed negligible enzyme activities.

Mentions: Seven species of white-rot fungi were grown in liquid medium containing amaranth for four days. Low-N Kirk’s was chosen because most species (6 of 7) had substantial decoloration capabilities on agar-solidified medium of this composition (Table 3). All species began decoloration immediately (Figure 1). Phlebia radiata, Bjerkandera adusta, and T. cotonea decolored amaranth only slightly which may be attributed to sorption to biomass rather than by enzymatic degradation. This is corroborated by the lack of detectable MnP and laccase activities in these species (Figure 2). The remaining species did not absorb dye. Trametes multicolor and T. pubescens decolored the best and both were able to decolor a second addition of dye within a 24 hour period, with the rates of the 2nd decoloration being approximately double that of the first exposures. Trametes versicolor and T. meyenii were able to achieve approx. 94 and 77 percent decoloration within 24 hours, respectively.


Trametes meyenii possesses elevated dye degradation abilities under normal nutritional conditions compared to other white rot fungi.

Chenaux PR, Lalji N, Lefebvre DD - AMB Express (2014)

Laccase and MnP activities by 9-day-old cultures in low-N Kirk’s liquid medium.B. adusta(♦), P. radiata (□), T. cotonea (▲), T. meyenii (○), T. pubescens (●), T. multicolor (■), T. versicolor (∆). S.D. always less than 5% (n = 5). B. adusta, P. radiata and T. cotonea all displayed negligible enzyme activities.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230814&req=5

Figure 2: Laccase and MnP activities by 9-day-old cultures in low-N Kirk’s liquid medium.B. adusta(♦), P. radiata (□), T. cotonea (▲), T. meyenii (○), T. pubescens (●), T. multicolor (■), T. versicolor (∆). S.D. always less than 5% (n = 5). B. adusta, P. radiata and T. cotonea all displayed negligible enzyme activities.
Mentions: Seven species of white-rot fungi were grown in liquid medium containing amaranth for four days. Low-N Kirk’s was chosen because most species (6 of 7) had substantial decoloration capabilities on agar-solidified medium of this composition (Table 3). All species began decoloration immediately (Figure 1). Phlebia radiata, Bjerkandera adusta, and T. cotonea decolored amaranth only slightly which may be attributed to sorption to biomass rather than by enzymatic degradation. This is corroborated by the lack of detectable MnP and laccase activities in these species (Figure 2). The remaining species did not absorb dye. Trametes multicolor and T. pubescens decolored the best and both were able to decolor a second addition of dye within a 24 hour period, with the rates of the 2nd decoloration being approximately double that of the first exposures. Trametes versicolor and T. meyenii were able to achieve approx. 94 and 77 percent decoloration within 24 hours, respectively.

Bottom Line: Trametes pubescens, T. multicolor, T. meyenii and T. versicolor decoloured amaranth azo-dye best on low-nitrogen agar-solidified media whereas Bjerkandera adusta and Phlebia radiata were most effective in low nitrogen medium supplemented with manganese.This appears to be because of inadequate Mn(3+) chelation required by manganese peroxidase because adding relatively low amounts of malonate enhanced decolouration rates.The ability of Trametes meyenii to simultaneously decolour dye over prolonged periods of time while growing in relatively nutrient-rich medium appears to be unique amongst white-rot fungi, indicating its potential in wastewater bioremediation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Queen's University, Kingston K7L 3 N6, ON, Canada.

ABSTRACT
Several species of white-rot fungi were investigated for their utility in prolonged decolouration of the recalcitrant sulfonated azo dye, amaranth. Trametes pubescens, T. multicolor, T. meyenii and T. versicolor decoloured amaranth azo-dye best on low-nitrogen agar-solidified media whereas Bjerkandera adusta and Phlebia radiata were most effective in low nitrogen medium supplemented with manganese. Trametes cotonea did not decolour effectively under any condition. The decolouring Trametes species were also effective in liquid culture whereas B. adusta and P. radiata were not. Trametes meyenii, T. pubescens and T. multicolor were equal to or better than commonly employed T. versicolor at decolouring amaranth. This is the first study to show the dye decolouration potential of T. meyenii, T. pubescens, and T. multicolor. Supplementing with Mn(II) increased assayable manganese peroxidase activity, but not long-term decolouration, indicating that laccase is the main decolourizing enzyme in these Trametes species. This appears to be because of inadequate Mn(3+) chelation required by manganese peroxidase because adding relatively low amounts of malonate enhanced decolouration rates. The ability of Trametes meyenii to simultaneously decolour dye over prolonged periods of time while growing in relatively nutrient-rich medium appears to be unique amongst white-rot fungi, indicating its potential in wastewater bioremediation.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus