Limits...
Prayer-for-health and complementary alternative medicine use among Malaysian breast cancer patients during chemotherapy.

Chui PL, Abdullah KL, Wong LP, Taib NA - BMC Complement Altern Med (2014)

Bottom Line: The total number of patients who used MBPs decreased from 342 to 183.Most MBPs were perceived to be more helpful by their users, compared with the users of NPs and TM.Excluding PFH from the definition of CAM reduced the prevalence of overall CAM use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia. chuipinglei@um.edu.my.

ABSTRACT

Background: The inclusion of prayer-for-health (PFH) in the definition of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) has resulted in higher levels of CAM use. The objective of this study was to assess PFH and CAM use among breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed at two chemotherapy providers. Patients were questioned about use of three categories of CAM, mind-body practices (MBPs), natural products (NPs) and traditional medicine (TM). PFH was also examined separately from CAM to better characterise the patterns of CAM and PFH used during chemotherapy.

Results: A total of 546 eligible patients participated in the study; 70.7% (n = 386) reported using some form of CAM, and 29.3% (n = 160) were non-CAM users. When PFH was excluded as a CAM, fewer patients reported the use of CAM (66.1%; n = 361). The total number of patients who used MBPs decreased from 342 to 183. The most common CAM use category was NPs (82.8%), followed by MBPs (50.7%), and TM (35.7%). CAM users were more likely to have a tertiary education (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.15-3.89 vs. primary/lower), have household incomes > RM 3,000 (≈944 USD) per month (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.40-3.84 vs. ≤RM 3,000 (≈944 USD)), and have advanced cancer (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.18-2.59 vs. early stage cancer), compared with non-CAM users. The CAM users were less likely to have their chemotherapy on schedule (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.10-0.58 vs. chemotherapy postponed) than non-CAM users. Most MBPs were perceived to be more helpful by their users, compared with the users of NPs and TM.

Conclusion: CAM use was prevalent among breast cancer patients. Excluding PFH from the definition of CAM reduced the prevalence of overall CAM use. Overall, CAM use was associated with higher education levels and household incomes, advanced cancer and lower chemotherapy schedule compliance. Many patients perceived MBP to be beneficial for improving overall well-being during chemotherapy. These findings, while preliminary, clearly indicate the differences in CAM use when PFH is included in, and excluded from, the definition of CAM.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Illustration of the inclusion process of the survey participants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230750&req=5

Fig1: Illustration of the inclusion process of the survey participants.

Mentions: Because the sample frame was small, all eligible patients who attended the UMMC and HKL chemotherapy day-care centres between March 2012 and August 2013 were approached and were informed about the study. Patients were excluded from the study if they had been diagnosed with a history of other cancers besides breast cancer, had previously received chemotherapy, received targeted therapy with trastuzumab instead of a chemotherapy regime, were mentally or physically incompetent, or were unable to communicate in English, Bahasa Malaysia, Mandarin or Tamil. Five hundred and sixty-three eligible patients consented to participate in the study. They were interviewed by the researcher in the health education room at the chemotherapy day-care centres. The participants were asked about the CAM they had used, particularly during chemotherapy, on their cancer- and chemotherapy-related side effects and symptoms. Each face-to-face structured interview was between 20 and 30 min in length. In total, 546 patients (97.0% response rate) completed the interview. The reasons for non-completion included being too tired, having poor physical health, lack of interest and answering similar questions in another study (Figure 1). The study was registered with the National Medical Research Registry (NMRR-10-111-5204) and was approved by the Ethical Committee of the Medical Research Ethnics Committee (MREC), Ministry of Health Malaysia, and the UMMC Medical Ethics Committee (Ref.770.18). All participants were reassured that confidentiality of their information would be maintained, and informed written consent was obtained from each participant.Figure 1


Prayer-for-health and complementary alternative medicine use among Malaysian breast cancer patients during chemotherapy.

Chui PL, Abdullah KL, Wong LP, Taib NA - BMC Complement Altern Med (2014)

Illustration of the inclusion process of the survey participants.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230750&req=5

Fig1: Illustration of the inclusion process of the survey participants.
Mentions: Because the sample frame was small, all eligible patients who attended the UMMC and HKL chemotherapy day-care centres between March 2012 and August 2013 were approached and were informed about the study. Patients were excluded from the study if they had been diagnosed with a history of other cancers besides breast cancer, had previously received chemotherapy, received targeted therapy with trastuzumab instead of a chemotherapy regime, were mentally or physically incompetent, or were unable to communicate in English, Bahasa Malaysia, Mandarin or Tamil. Five hundred and sixty-three eligible patients consented to participate in the study. They were interviewed by the researcher in the health education room at the chemotherapy day-care centres. The participants were asked about the CAM they had used, particularly during chemotherapy, on their cancer- and chemotherapy-related side effects and symptoms. Each face-to-face structured interview was between 20 and 30 min in length. In total, 546 patients (97.0% response rate) completed the interview. The reasons for non-completion included being too tired, having poor physical health, lack of interest and answering similar questions in another study (Figure 1). The study was registered with the National Medical Research Registry (NMRR-10-111-5204) and was approved by the Ethical Committee of the Medical Research Ethnics Committee (MREC), Ministry of Health Malaysia, and the UMMC Medical Ethics Committee (Ref.770.18). All participants were reassured that confidentiality of their information would be maintained, and informed written consent was obtained from each participant.Figure 1

Bottom Line: The total number of patients who used MBPs decreased from 342 to 183.Most MBPs were perceived to be more helpful by their users, compared with the users of NPs and TM.Excluding PFH from the definition of CAM reduced the prevalence of overall CAM use.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia. chuipinglei@um.edu.my.

ABSTRACT

Background: The inclusion of prayer-for-health (PFH) in the definition of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) has resulted in higher levels of CAM use. The objective of this study was to assess PFH and CAM use among breast cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed at two chemotherapy providers. Patients were questioned about use of three categories of CAM, mind-body practices (MBPs), natural products (NPs) and traditional medicine (TM). PFH was also examined separately from CAM to better characterise the patterns of CAM and PFH used during chemotherapy.

Results: A total of 546 eligible patients participated in the study; 70.7% (n = 386) reported using some form of CAM, and 29.3% (n = 160) were non-CAM users. When PFH was excluded as a CAM, fewer patients reported the use of CAM (66.1%; n = 361). The total number of patients who used MBPs decreased from 342 to 183. The most common CAM use category was NPs (82.8%), followed by MBPs (50.7%), and TM (35.7%). CAM users were more likely to have a tertiary education (OR 2.11, 95% CI 1.15-3.89 vs. primary/lower), have household incomes > RM 3,000 (≈944 USD) per month (OR 2.32, 95% CI 1.40-3.84 vs. ≤RM 3,000 (≈944 USD)), and have advanced cancer (OR 1.75, 95% CI 1.18-2.59 vs. early stage cancer), compared with non-CAM users. The CAM users were less likely to have their chemotherapy on schedule (OR 0.24, 95% CI 0.10-0.58 vs. chemotherapy postponed) than non-CAM users. Most MBPs were perceived to be more helpful by their users, compared with the users of NPs and TM.

Conclusion: CAM use was prevalent among breast cancer patients. Excluding PFH from the definition of CAM reduced the prevalence of overall CAM use. Overall, CAM use was associated with higher education levels and household incomes, advanced cancer and lower chemotherapy schedule compliance. Many patients perceived MBP to be beneficial for improving overall well-being during chemotherapy. These findings, while preliminary, clearly indicate the differences in CAM use when PFH is included in, and excluded from, the definition of CAM.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus