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Goya and tinea favosa.

Vallarelli AF - An Bras Dermatol (2014 Nov-Dec)

Bottom Line: A case of a tinea favosa involving the scalp of a child represented in the painting "Boys climbing a tree" (Muchachos trepando a un árbol), by Francisco Goya y Lucientes, with pictorial representation of favic scutula and consequent alopecia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
A case of a tinea favosa involving the scalp of a child represented in the painting "Boys climbing a tree" (Muchachos trepando a un árbol), by Francisco Goya y Lucientes, with pictorial representation of favic scutula and consequent alopecia.

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Painting “Boys climbing a tree”/ Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de / oil on canvas/ c.1791 – 2 / © Madrid, El Prado National Museum, Spain / 141 X 111 cm, seen in greaterdetail. Presence of gray circular spots (favic scutula). A lighter area below thespots represents the scalp skin (consequent alopecia)
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f03: Painting “Boys climbing a tree”/ Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de / oil on canvas/ c.1791 – 2 / © Madrid, El Prado National Museum, Spain / 141 X 111 cm, seen in greaterdetail. Presence of gray circular spots (favic scutula). A lighter area below thespots represents the scalp skin (consequent alopecia)

Mentions: Hannelore Mittag described a probable tinea favosa represented in the painting "ChristCarrying the Cross"/Bosch, Hieronymus.9In the current study, alopecia can be seen in the crouching child represented in thepainting "Boys climbing a tree" by Goya (Figure 1). Adetailed examination reveals gray circular spots (characterized by vigorous brushwork) inthe parietal-occipital region of the scalp (Figure2). Below, there is a lighter area. Thin brushstrokes in the frontal and occipitalregion represent rarefied hair (Figure 3)


Goya and tinea favosa.

Vallarelli AF - An Bras Dermatol (2014 Nov-Dec)

Painting “Boys climbing a tree”/ Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de / oil on canvas/ c.1791 – 2 / © Madrid, El Prado National Museum, Spain / 141 X 111 cm, seen in greaterdetail. Presence of gray circular spots (favic scutula). A lighter area below thespots represents the scalp skin (consequent alopecia)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230674&req=5

f03: Painting “Boys climbing a tree”/ Goya y Lucientes, Francisco de / oil on canvas/ c.1791 – 2 / © Madrid, El Prado National Museum, Spain / 141 X 111 cm, seen in greaterdetail. Presence of gray circular spots (favic scutula). A lighter area below thespots represents the scalp skin (consequent alopecia)
Mentions: Hannelore Mittag described a probable tinea favosa represented in the painting "ChristCarrying the Cross"/Bosch, Hieronymus.9In the current study, alopecia can be seen in the crouching child represented in thepainting "Boys climbing a tree" by Goya (Figure 1). Adetailed examination reveals gray circular spots (characterized by vigorous brushwork) inthe parietal-occipital region of the scalp (Figure2). Below, there is a lighter area. Thin brushstrokes in the frontal and occipitalregion represent rarefied hair (Figure 3)

Bottom Line: A case of a tinea favosa involving the scalp of a child represented in the painting "Boys climbing a tree" (Muchachos trepando a un árbol), by Francisco Goya y Lucientes, with pictorial representation of favic scutula and consequent alopecia.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, SP, Brazil.

ABSTRACT
A case of a tinea favosa involving the scalp of a child represented in the painting "Boys climbing a tree" (Muchachos trepando a un árbol), by Francisco Goya y Lucientes, with pictorial representation of favic scutula and consequent alopecia.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus