Limits...
Crafting a career in molecular animation.

Iwasa J - Mol. Biol. Cell (2014)

Bottom Line: What happened?In this essay, I will describe the experiences that led to my decision to forge a career as an academic molecular animator, and how my work has evolved over the years.I will also provide some resources and advice for those who may be considering following a similar route.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84105 jiwasa@biochem.utah.edu.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

(A) An illustration of a protocell, created in collaboration with the Szostak Lab (Massachusetts General Hospital). Self-replicating nucleic acids (blue/white) are encapsulated by a fatty acid vesicle (red/gray). (B) Different steps of clathrin-mediated endocytosis are illustrated, from an animation created in collaboration with Tomas Kirchhausen (Harvard Medical School). (C) A 3D model of a HIV particle. The conical capsid (orange) surrounds viral RNA and nucleocapsid (blue/pink). The membrane (green) is studded with envelope protein (blue/red).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230579&req=5

Figure 1: (A) An illustration of a protocell, created in collaboration with the Szostak Lab (Massachusetts General Hospital). Self-replicating nucleic acids (blue/white) are encapsulated by a fatty acid vesicle (red/gray). (B) Different steps of clathrin-mediated endocytosis are illustrated, from an animation created in collaboration with Tomas Kirchhausen (Harvard Medical School). (C) A 3D model of a HIV particle. The conical capsid (orange) surrounds viral RNA and nucleocapsid (blue/pink). The membrane (green) is studded with envelope protein (blue/red).

Mentions: Even with the training I had received, I was still largely figuring things out as I went along, trying to create solutions to animating tricky molecules like RNA and fatty acids (you can read about some of these challenges in a blog post I wrote for Science magazine's Origins series: http://blogs.sciencemag.org/origins/2009/01/visualizing-lifes-origins.html). Fortunately, my years in graduate school had taught me persistence and the ability to troubleshoot, and the project was completed successfully with the launching of a website (see http://ExploringOrigins.org and Figure 1A), the installation of an origins of life interactive kiosk in the museum, and a series of live presentations to museum visitors. Along the way, I had started to build an identity for myself as a molecular animator and to explore my options for the next steps in my career.


Crafting a career in molecular animation.

Iwasa J - Mol. Biol. Cell (2014)

(A) An illustration of a protocell, created in collaboration with the Szostak Lab (Massachusetts General Hospital). Self-replicating nucleic acids (blue/white) are encapsulated by a fatty acid vesicle (red/gray). (B) Different steps of clathrin-mediated endocytosis are illustrated, from an animation created in collaboration with Tomas Kirchhausen (Harvard Medical School). (C) A 3D model of a HIV particle. The conical capsid (orange) surrounds viral RNA and nucleocapsid (blue/pink). The membrane (green) is studded with envelope protein (blue/red).
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230579&req=5

Figure 1: (A) An illustration of a protocell, created in collaboration with the Szostak Lab (Massachusetts General Hospital). Self-replicating nucleic acids (blue/white) are encapsulated by a fatty acid vesicle (red/gray). (B) Different steps of clathrin-mediated endocytosis are illustrated, from an animation created in collaboration with Tomas Kirchhausen (Harvard Medical School). (C) A 3D model of a HIV particle. The conical capsid (orange) surrounds viral RNA and nucleocapsid (blue/pink). The membrane (green) is studded with envelope protein (blue/red).
Mentions: Even with the training I had received, I was still largely figuring things out as I went along, trying to create solutions to animating tricky molecules like RNA and fatty acids (you can read about some of these challenges in a blog post I wrote for Science magazine's Origins series: http://blogs.sciencemag.org/origins/2009/01/visualizing-lifes-origins.html). Fortunately, my years in graduate school had taught me persistence and the ability to troubleshoot, and the project was completed successfully with the launching of a website (see http://ExploringOrigins.org and Figure 1A), the installation of an origins of life interactive kiosk in the museum, and a series of live presentations to museum visitors. Along the way, I had started to build an identity for myself as a molecular animator and to explore my options for the next steps in my career.

Bottom Line: What happened?In this essay, I will describe the experiences that led to my decision to forge a career as an academic molecular animator, and how my work has evolved over the years.I will also provide some resources and advice for those who may be considering following a similar route.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biochemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84105 jiwasa@biochem.utah.edu.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus