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Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

Hesselmark E, Plenty S, Bejerot S - Autism (2013)

Bottom Line: Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions.No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed.The interventions' similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ehesselmark@gmail.com.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Study flowchart.CBT: cognitive behavioural therapy; RA: recreational activity group; QOLI: Quality of Life Inventory; SoC: Sense of Coherence Scale; PCGI-S: Patient Rated Clinical Global Improvement–Severity; SCL-90 (mean): Symptom Checklist 90; AQ: Autism Quotient; BDI: Beck Depression Index; ASRS: Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale; RSES: Rosenberg Scale of Self-Esteem; CI: confidence interval; LOCF: last observation carried forward.
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fig1-1362361313493681: Study flowchart.CBT: cognitive behavioural therapy; RA: recreational activity group; QOLI: Quality of Life Inventory; SoC: Sense of Coherence Scale; PCGI-S: Patient Rated Clinical Global Improvement–Severity; SCL-90 (mean): Symptom Checklist 90; AQ: Autism Quotient; BDI: Beck Depression Index; ASRS: Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale; RSES: Rosenberg Scale of Self-Esteem; CI: confidence interval; LOCF: last observation carried forward.

Mentions: Participants were recruited through referrals from psychiatric clinics and advertisements in patient organizations and publications. All participants had been clinically diagnosed with ASD, confirmed by medical records, the Autism Diagnostic Observational Schedule (ADOS; Lord et al., 2000) and clinical interviews. After inclusion, 73 patients were stratified by gender and blindly randomized to one of the two treatment conditions. A team member uninvolved in the study made the random allocation manually with the use of a paper-based lottery. Two additional patients were included without being randomized during the last year of the study to compensate for the greater attrition in the recreational intervention. Overall, 7 patients chose not to begin intervention, resulting in 68 participants. A total of 14 participants who attended less than 10 sessions were defined as dropouts resulting in 54 completers (see Figure 1).


Group cognitive behavioural therapy and group recreational activity for adults with autism spectrum disorders: a preliminary randomized controlled trial.

Hesselmark E, Plenty S, Bejerot S - Autism (2013)

Study flowchart.CBT: cognitive behavioural therapy; RA: recreational activity group; QOLI: Quality of Life Inventory; SoC: Sense of Coherence Scale; PCGI-S: Patient Rated Clinical Global Improvement–Severity; SCL-90 (mean): Symptom Checklist 90; AQ: Autism Quotient; BDI: Beck Depression Index; ASRS: Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale; RSES: Rosenberg Scale of Self-Esteem; CI: confidence interval; LOCF: last observation carried forward.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230566&req=5

fig1-1362361313493681: Study flowchart.CBT: cognitive behavioural therapy; RA: recreational activity group; QOLI: Quality of Life Inventory; SoC: Sense of Coherence Scale; PCGI-S: Patient Rated Clinical Global Improvement–Severity; SCL-90 (mean): Symptom Checklist 90; AQ: Autism Quotient; BDI: Beck Depression Index; ASRS: Adult ADHD Self-Report Scale; RSES: Rosenberg Scale of Self-Esteem; CI: confidence interval; LOCF: last observation carried forward.
Mentions: Participants were recruited through referrals from psychiatric clinics and advertisements in patient organizations and publications. All participants had been clinically diagnosed with ASD, confirmed by medical records, the Autism Diagnostic Observational Schedule (ADOS; Lord et al., 2000) and clinical interviews. After inclusion, 73 patients were stratified by gender and blindly randomized to one of the two treatment conditions. A team member uninvolved in the study made the random allocation manually with the use of a paper-based lottery. Two additional patients were included without being randomized during the last year of the study to compensate for the greater attrition in the recreational intervention. Overall, 7 patients chose not to begin intervention, resulting in 68 participants. A total of 14 participants who attended less than 10 sessions were defined as dropouts resulting in 54 completers (see Figure 1).

Bottom Line: Participants in both treatment conditions reported an increased quality of life at post-treatment (d = 0.39, p < 0.001), with no difference between interventions.No amelioration of psychiatric symptoms was observed.The interventions' similar efficacy may be due to the common elements, structure and group setting.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden ehesselmark@gmail.com.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus