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Satisfaction with cosmesis and priorities for cosmesis design reported by lower limb amputees in the United Kingdom: instrument development and results.

Cairns N, Murray K, Corney J, McFadyen A - Prosthet Orthot Int (2013)

Bottom Line: Statistically significant relationships between two demographic, satisfaction or importance variables were tested using Fisher's exact tests (one-tailed) at a significance level p = 0.05.Between 49% and 64% of respondents reported neutral or dissatisfied opinions with the cosmesis features (greater than 50% for five of the nine features).The results indicate that current cosmesis satisfaction levels of amputees in the United Kingdom are below what the medical device industry and clinical community would desire.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK nicola.j.cairns@strath.ac.uk.

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Prosthesis use reported in terms of (a) total years wearing a prosthesis and (b) hours per day wearing current prosthesis.
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fig1-0309364613512149: Prosthesis use reported in terms of (a) total years wearing a prosthesis and (b) hours per day wearing current prosthesis.

Mentions: Prosthesis use is illustrated in Figure 1. When asked to assess their activity level, 15% of the amputees classed themselves as indoor-only walkers, 48% as limited outdoor walkers, 23% considered themselves active outdoor walkers and 7% very active sporting participants (7% missing data). The proportion of female active outdoor walkers was significantly greater than those who were male (p = 0.007). However, no statistically significant association was found between physical activity level and any of the following demographic features: age, amputation level, or how many hours per day the prosthesis was worn.


Satisfaction with cosmesis and priorities for cosmesis design reported by lower limb amputees in the United Kingdom: instrument development and results.

Cairns N, Murray K, Corney J, McFadyen A - Prosthet Orthot Int (2013)

Prosthesis use reported in terms of (a) total years wearing a prosthesis and (b) hours per day wearing current prosthesis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230545&req=5

fig1-0309364613512149: Prosthesis use reported in terms of (a) total years wearing a prosthesis and (b) hours per day wearing current prosthesis.
Mentions: Prosthesis use is illustrated in Figure 1. When asked to assess their activity level, 15% of the amputees classed themselves as indoor-only walkers, 48% as limited outdoor walkers, 23% considered themselves active outdoor walkers and 7% very active sporting participants (7% missing data). The proportion of female active outdoor walkers was significantly greater than those who were male (p = 0.007). However, no statistically significant association was found between physical activity level and any of the following demographic features: age, amputation level, or how many hours per day the prosthesis was worn.

Bottom Line: Statistically significant relationships between two demographic, satisfaction or importance variables were tested using Fisher's exact tests (one-tailed) at a significance level p = 0.05.Between 49% and 64% of respondents reported neutral or dissatisfied opinions with the cosmesis features (greater than 50% for five of the nine features).The results indicate that current cosmesis satisfaction levels of amputees in the United Kingdom are below what the medical device industry and clinical community would desire.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Design, Manufacture and Engineering Management, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK National Centre for Prosthetics and Orthotics, Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK nicola.j.cairns@strath.ac.uk.

Show MeSH