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On Feeling Torn About One's Sexuality: The Effects of Explicit-Implicit Sexual Orientation Ambivalence.

Windsor-Shellard B, Haddock G - Pers Soc Psychol Bull (2014)

Bottom Line: The results revealed that participants with greater SO ambivalence took longer responding to explicit questions about their sexual preferences, an effect moderated by the direction of ambivalence.Study 2 replicated this effect using a different paradigm.Among straight participants, the response time results replicated the findings of Studies 1 and 2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiff University, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Study 3: The impact of the amount (separate lines) and direction (x axis) of SO ambivalence on explicit self-esteem (gay participants).Note. SO = sexual orientation.
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fig6-0146167214539018: Study 3: The impact of the amount (separate lines) and direction (x axis) of SO ambivalence on explicit self-esteem (gay participants).Note. SO = sexual orientation.

Mentions: On the explicit measure of self-esteem, among gay participants there was a significant amount by direction interaction, β = .62, t(44) = 2.61, p = .01 (see Figure 6). This showed that individuals with a low amount of SO ambivalence had the highest ESE when they reported being less gay on the explicit measure of SO relative to the implicit measure, β = −1.34, t(44) = −3.11, p = .003. Furthermore, a significant difference in ESE was observed for those with a low amount of SO ambivalence. Specifically, when participants reported being less gay on the explicit measure of SO relative to the implicit measure this implicated significantly higher self-esteem, β = −1.80, t(44) = 2.37, p = .02. For those individuals with a high amount of SO ambivalence, there was no observed impact of the direction of ambivalence on ESE, β = −.09, t < 1.


On Feeling Torn About One's Sexuality: The Effects of Explicit-Implicit Sexual Orientation Ambivalence.

Windsor-Shellard B, Haddock G - Pers Soc Psychol Bull (2014)

Study 3: The impact of the amount (separate lines) and direction (x axis) of SO ambivalence on explicit self-esteem (gay participants).Note. SO = sexual orientation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2 - License 3
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230544&req=5

fig6-0146167214539018: Study 3: The impact of the amount (separate lines) and direction (x axis) of SO ambivalence on explicit self-esteem (gay participants).Note. SO = sexual orientation.
Mentions: On the explicit measure of self-esteem, among gay participants there was a significant amount by direction interaction, β = .62, t(44) = 2.61, p = .01 (see Figure 6). This showed that individuals with a low amount of SO ambivalence had the highest ESE when they reported being less gay on the explicit measure of SO relative to the implicit measure, β = −1.34, t(44) = −3.11, p = .003. Furthermore, a significant difference in ESE was observed for those with a low amount of SO ambivalence. Specifically, when participants reported being less gay on the explicit measure of SO relative to the implicit measure this implicated significantly higher self-esteem, β = −1.80, t(44) = 2.37, p = .02. For those individuals with a high amount of SO ambivalence, there was no observed impact of the direction of ambivalence on ESE, β = −.09, t < 1.

Bottom Line: The results revealed that participants with greater SO ambivalence took longer responding to explicit questions about their sexual preferences, an effect moderated by the direction of ambivalence.Study 2 replicated this effect using a different paradigm.Among straight participants, the response time results replicated the findings of Studies 1 and 2.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cardiff University, UK.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus