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The natural place to begin: the ethnoprimatology of the Waorani.

Papworth S, Milner-Gulland EJ, Slocombe K - Am. J. Primatol. (2013)

Bottom Line: Although there is some evidence that the Waorani consider primates a unique group, the non-primate kinkajou and olingo are also included as part of the group "monkeys," and no evidence was found that primates were more important than other mammals to Waorani culture.These results have implications for both ethnoprimatologists and those working with local communities towards broader conservation goals.Firstly, researchers should ensure that they and local communities are referring to the same animals when they use broad terms such as "monkey," and secondly the results caution ethnoprimatologists against imposing western taxonomic groups on indigenous peoples, rather than allowing them to define themselves which species are important.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Ecology and Evolution, Imperial College, Ascot, United Kingdom; Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.

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Preferred species for consumption. a: All species, primate species are shown with lighter gray bars. b: Preferred primate species for consumption.
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fig05: Preferred species for consumption. a: All species, primate species are shown with lighter gray bars. b: Preferred primate species for consumption.

Mentions: The 27 participants named 12 species as preferred species for consumption, the most popular of which was white lipped peccary (Fig. 5a). The white lipped peccary was also found by Franzen [2006] to be the most important contributor to the diet of the communities when measured by number of individuals and meat weight (45% of all meat weight). When asked about preferences within only monkeys, the overwhelming majority preferred woolly monkeys (preferred species score 13.5 from a sample 24 individuals, Fig. 5b). Individuals named either one or the other peccary species as their favorite, but never named both. In contrast, when asked their favorite primate species, six individuals named both the woolly and spider monkey. It is unclear whether this is because it is difficult to distinguish the two tastes, thus both are equally preferred.


The natural place to begin: the ethnoprimatology of the Waorani.

Papworth S, Milner-Gulland EJ, Slocombe K - Am. J. Primatol. (2013)

Preferred species for consumption. a: All species, primate species are shown with lighter gray bars. b: Preferred primate species for consumption.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230474&req=5

fig05: Preferred species for consumption. a: All species, primate species are shown with lighter gray bars. b: Preferred primate species for consumption.
Mentions: The 27 participants named 12 species as preferred species for consumption, the most popular of which was white lipped peccary (Fig. 5a). The white lipped peccary was also found by Franzen [2006] to be the most important contributor to the diet of the communities when measured by number of individuals and meat weight (45% of all meat weight). When asked about preferences within only monkeys, the overwhelming majority preferred woolly monkeys (preferred species score 13.5 from a sample 24 individuals, Fig. 5b). Individuals named either one or the other peccary species as their favorite, but never named both. In contrast, when asked their favorite primate species, six individuals named both the woolly and spider monkey. It is unclear whether this is because it is difficult to distinguish the two tastes, thus both are equally preferred.

Bottom Line: Although there is some evidence that the Waorani consider primates a unique group, the non-primate kinkajou and olingo are also included as part of the group "monkeys," and no evidence was found that primates were more important than other mammals to Waorani culture.These results have implications for both ethnoprimatologists and those working with local communities towards broader conservation goals.Firstly, researchers should ensure that they and local communities are referring to the same animals when they use broad terms such as "monkey," and secondly the results caution ethnoprimatologists against imposing western taxonomic groups on indigenous peoples, rather than allowing them to define themselves which species are important.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Ecology and Evolution, Imperial College, Ascot, United Kingdom; Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus