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The natural place to begin: the ethnoprimatology of the Waorani.

Papworth S, Milner-Gulland EJ, Slocombe K - Am. J. Primatol. (2013)

Bottom Line: Although there is some evidence that the Waorani consider primates a unique group, the non-primate kinkajou and olingo are also included as part of the group "monkeys," and no evidence was found that primates were more important than other mammals to Waorani culture.These results have implications for both ethnoprimatologists and those working with local communities towards broader conservation goals.Firstly, researchers should ensure that they and local communities are referring to the same animals when they use broad terms such as "monkey," and secondly the results caution ethnoprimatologists against imposing western taxonomic groups on indigenous peoples, rather than allowing them to define themselves which species are important.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Ecology and Evolution, Imperial College, Ascot, United Kingdom; Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.

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Proportion of 24 participants who recognised and correctly named each of the 18 focal species. Lighter gray bars are primate species. Potus flavus and Bassaricyon alleni were only considered correctly named when referred to as gamönga and ganata, respectively.
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fig02: Proportion of 24 participants who recognised and correctly named each of the 18 focal species. Lighter gray bars are primate species. Potus flavus and Bassaricyon alleni were only considered correctly named when referred to as gamönga and ganata, respectively.

Mentions: The most recognized species were the white lipped peccary, red brocket deer (Mazama americana), and woolly monkey, but all species were recognized by at least two thirds of participants. Nevertheless, some species were frequently confused, in particular, the olingo and kinkajou (Fig. 2). Other species whose names were sometimes confused were the two peccary species, and the red titi monkey and howler monkey. Names for species were given in Spanish, Wao terero and Quichua, with many participants giving multiple names in different languages for a single species. Nevertheless, all species were most frequently named in Wao terero, with the exception of the red brocket deer, which was most frequently named in Spanish, and the white lipped peccary (Tasyassu pecari) and collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), which were equally likely to be named in Wao terero or Quichua. The ten species for which three or fewer individuals were traded in Pompeya market were more likely to be referred to in Wao terero than those with eight or more records in the market (Wilcoxon rank sum test, Nhigh-trade = 7, Nlow-trade = 11, W = 68.5, P = 0.007).


The natural place to begin: the ethnoprimatology of the Waorani.

Papworth S, Milner-Gulland EJ, Slocombe K - Am. J. Primatol. (2013)

Proportion of 24 participants who recognised and correctly named each of the 18 focal species. Lighter gray bars are primate species. Potus flavus and Bassaricyon alleni were only considered correctly named when referred to as gamönga and ganata, respectively.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230474&req=5

fig02: Proportion of 24 participants who recognised and correctly named each of the 18 focal species. Lighter gray bars are primate species. Potus flavus and Bassaricyon alleni were only considered correctly named when referred to as gamönga and ganata, respectively.
Mentions: The most recognized species were the white lipped peccary, red brocket deer (Mazama americana), and woolly monkey, but all species were recognized by at least two thirds of participants. Nevertheless, some species were frequently confused, in particular, the olingo and kinkajou (Fig. 2). Other species whose names were sometimes confused were the two peccary species, and the red titi monkey and howler monkey. Names for species were given in Spanish, Wao terero and Quichua, with many participants giving multiple names in different languages for a single species. Nevertheless, all species were most frequently named in Wao terero, with the exception of the red brocket deer, which was most frequently named in Spanish, and the white lipped peccary (Tasyassu pecari) and collared peccary (Pecari tajacu), which were equally likely to be named in Wao terero or Quichua. The ten species for which three or fewer individuals were traded in Pompeya market were more likely to be referred to in Wao terero than those with eight or more records in the market (Wilcoxon rank sum test, Nhigh-trade = 7, Nlow-trade = 11, W = 68.5, P = 0.007).

Bottom Line: Although there is some evidence that the Waorani consider primates a unique group, the non-primate kinkajou and olingo are also included as part of the group "monkeys," and no evidence was found that primates were more important than other mammals to Waorani culture.These results have implications for both ethnoprimatologists and those working with local communities towards broader conservation goals.Firstly, researchers should ensure that they and local communities are referring to the same animals when they use broad terms such as "monkey," and secondly the results caution ethnoprimatologists against imposing western taxonomic groups on indigenous peoples, rather than allowing them to define themselves which species are important.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Ecology and Evolution, Imperial College, Ascot, United Kingdom; Centre for Environmental Policy, Imperial College, London, United Kingdom.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus