Limits...
Bacterial taxa-area and distance-decay relationships in marine environments.

Zinger L, Boetius A, Ramette A - Mol. Ecol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Noticeably, bacterial TAR and DDR patterns did not correlate with each other both within and across ecosystem types, suggesting that (i) TAR cannot be directly derived from DDR and (ii) TAR and DDR may be influenced by different ecological factors.Nevertheless, we found marine bacterial TAR and DDR to be steeper in ecosystems associated with high environmental heterogeneity or spatial isolation, namely marine sediments and coastal environments compared with pelagic ecosystems.Hence, our study provides information on macroecological patterns of marine bacteria, as well as methodological and conceptual insights, at a time when biodiversity surveys increasingly make use of high-throughput sequencing technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HGF-MPG Joint Research Group on Deep Sea Ecology and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen, D-28359, Germany; CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, UMR5174 EDB, 118 route de Narbonne, Toulouse, F-31062, France.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Variation of z (a) and /β/ (b) according to realms and ecosystem type. z and β values per ecosystem type were obtained by randomly resampling 40 samples and 5000 sequences per sample 1000 times in the initial community tables. Upper/lower case letters indicate significant differences (Mann–Whitney tests, Holm-corrected P < 0.05) between realms/ecosystem types.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230465&req=5

fig04: Variation of z (a) and /β/ (b) according to realms and ecosystem type. z and β values per ecosystem type were obtained by randomly resampling 40 samples and 5000 sequences per sample 1000 times in the initial community tables. Upper/lower case letters indicate significant differences (Mann–Whitney tests, Holm-corrected P < 0.05) between realms/ecosystem types.

Mentions: We first assessed the correlation between z and /β/ values obtained per ecosystem type at each resampling step and found them to be significantly, but weakly correlated (Fig. S4, Supporting information). When comparing z and /β/ values obtained for different realms/ecosystem types, they were always larger in sediments than in seawaters (Fig.4). Both z and β values were all significantly different among ecosystem types (excepted β values in coastal waters and deep-sea sediments; Fig.4), but did not rank similarly neither when considering z and /β/'s median values (Kendall τ = 0.43, P = 0.24), nor when comparing the correlation of z and β pairs generated at each resampling step against a distribution (W = 215218, P = 1; Fig. S5, Supporting information). Nevertheless, z and /β/ in coastal waters and coastal/deep-sea sediments were always the highest.


Bacterial taxa-area and distance-decay relationships in marine environments.

Zinger L, Boetius A, Ramette A - Mol. Ecol. (2014)

Variation of z (a) and /β/ (b) according to realms and ecosystem type. z and β values per ecosystem type were obtained by randomly resampling 40 samples and 5000 sequences per sample 1000 times in the initial community tables. Upper/lower case letters indicate significant differences (Mann–Whitney tests, Holm-corrected P < 0.05) between realms/ecosystem types.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230465&req=5

fig04: Variation of z (a) and /β/ (b) according to realms and ecosystem type. z and β values per ecosystem type were obtained by randomly resampling 40 samples and 5000 sequences per sample 1000 times in the initial community tables. Upper/lower case letters indicate significant differences (Mann–Whitney tests, Holm-corrected P < 0.05) between realms/ecosystem types.
Mentions: We first assessed the correlation between z and /β/ values obtained per ecosystem type at each resampling step and found them to be significantly, but weakly correlated (Fig. S4, Supporting information). When comparing z and /β/ values obtained for different realms/ecosystem types, they were always larger in sediments than in seawaters (Fig.4). Both z and β values were all significantly different among ecosystem types (excepted β values in coastal waters and deep-sea sediments; Fig.4), but did not rank similarly neither when considering z and /β/'s median values (Kendall τ = 0.43, P = 0.24), nor when comparing the correlation of z and β pairs generated at each resampling step against a distribution (W = 215218, P = 1; Fig. S5, Supporting information). Nevertheless, z and /β/ in coastal waters and coastal/deep-sea sediments were always the highest.

Bottom Line: Noticeably, bacterial TAR and DDR patterns did not correlate with each other both within and across ecosystem types, suggesting that (i) TAR cannot be directly derived from DDR and (ii) TAR and DDR may be influenced by different ecological factors.Nevertheless, we found marine bacterial TAR and DDR to be steeper in ecosystems associated with high environmental heterogeneity or spatial isolation, namely marine sediments and coastal environments compared with pelagic ecosystems.Hence, our study provides information on macroecological patterns of marine bacteria, as well as methodological and conceptual insights, at a time when biodiversity surveys increasingly make use of high-throughput sequencing technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HGF-MPG Joint Research Group on Deep Sea Ecology and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen, D-28359, Germany; CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, UMR5174 EDB, 118 route de Narbonne, Toulouse, F-31062, France.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus