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Bacterial taxa-area and distance-decay relationships in marine environments.

Zinger L, Boetius A, Ramette A - Mol. Ecol. (2014)

Bottom Line: Noticeably, bacterial TAR and DDR patterns did not correlate with each other both within and across ecosystem types, suggesting that (i) TAR cannot be directly derived from DDR and (ii) TAR and DDR may be influenced by different ecological factors.Nevertheless, we found marine bacterial TAR and DDR to be steeper in ecosystems associated with high environmental heterogeneity or spatial isolation, namely marine sediments and coastal environments compared with pelagic ecosystems.Hence, our study provides information on macroecological patterns of marine bacteria, as well as methodological and conceptual insights, at a time when biodiversity surveys increasingly make use of high-throughput sequencing technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HGF-MPG Joint Research Group on Deep Sea Ecology and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen, D-28359, Germany; CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, UMR5174 EDB, 118 route de Narbonne, Toulouse, F-31062, France.

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Taxa–area (a) and distance–decay (b) relationships of marine bacterial communities in surface-sea waters (n = 70), deep-sea waters (n = 61) and coastal sediments (n = 72), standardized at 5000 sequences per sample. Error bars in (a) represent the standard deviation of OTU richness according to the reference sample used. In both panels, dotted lines correspond to the 95% confidence intervals for linear regressions.
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fig01: Taxa–area (a) and distance–decay (b) relationships of marine bacterial communities in surface-sea waters (n = 70), deep-sea waters (n = 61) and coastal sediments (n = 72), standardized at 5000 sequences per sample. Error bars in (a) represent the standard deviation of OTU richness according to the reference sample used. In both panels, dotted lines correspond to the 95% confidence intervals for linear regressions.

Mentions: Quantifying and explaining spatial variation in biodiversity are among the most long-standing problems in ecology because variations of species richness and community composition in space may reflect a multitude of mechanisms responsible for species maintenance or loss. Spatial changes in biodiversity may be examined from gene to community levels, and from local to global scales, but two recurrent spatial patterns of diversity can be observed for all domains of life: First, increasing taxa richness has been repeatedly observed when considering increasingly larger areas (Connor & McCoy 1979; Rosenzweig 1995), a pattern referred to as the taxa–area relationship (hereafter TAR; Fig.1a). Second, the taxonomic composition of biological assemblages is often observed as becoming increasingly more dissimilar with increasing geographic distances, a pattern designated as the distance decay of compositional similarity (or distance–decay relationships, hereafter DDR; (Nekola & White 1999); Fig.1b).


Bacterial taxa-area and distance-decay relationships in marine environments.

Zinger L, Boetius A, Ramette A - Mol. Ecol. (2014)

Taxa–area (a) and distance–decay (b) relationships of marine bacterial communities in surface-sea waters (n = 70), deep-sea waters (n = 61) and coastal sediments (n = 72), standardized at 5000 sequences per sample. Error bars in (a) represent the standard deviation of OTU richness according to the reference sample used. In both panels, dotted lines correspond to the 95% confidence intervals for linear regressions.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230465&req=5

fig01: Taxa–area (a) and distance–decay (b) relationships of marine bacterial communities in surface-sea waters (n = 70), deep-sea waters (n = 61) and coastal sediments (n = 72), standardized at 5000 sequences per sample. Error bars in (a) represent the standard deviation of OTU richness according to the reference sample used. In both panels, dotted lines correspond to the 95% confidence intervals for linear regressions.
Mentions: Quantifying and explaining spatial variation in biodiversity are among the most long-standing problems in ecology because variations of species richness and community composition in space may reflect a multitude of mechanisms responsible for species maintenance or loss. Spatial changes in biodiversity may be examined from gene to community levels, and from local to global scales, but two recurrent spatial patterns of diversity can be observed for all domains of life: First, increasing taxa richness has been repeatedly observed when considering increasingly larger areas (Connor & McCoy 1979; Rosenzweig 1995), a pattern referred to as the taxa–area relationship (hereafter TAR; Fig.1a). Second, the taxonomic composition of biological assemblages is often observed as becoming increasingly more dissimilar with increasing geographic distances, a pattern designated as the distance decay of compositional similarity (or distance–decay relationships, hereafter DDR; (Nekola & White 1999); Fig.1b).

Bottom Line: Noticeably, bacterial TAR and DDR patterns did not correlate with each other both within and across ecosystem types, suggesting that (i) TAR cannot be directly derived from DDR and (ii) TAR and DDR may be influenced by different ecological factors.Nevertheless, we found marine bacterial TAR and DDR to be steeper in ecosystems associated with high environmental heterogeneity or spatial isolation, namely marine sediments and coastal environments compared with pelagic ecosystems.Hence, our study provides information on macroecological patterns of marine bacteria, as well as methodological and conceptual insights, at a time when biodiversity surveys increasingly make use of high-throughput sequencing technologies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: HGF-MPG Joint Research Group on Deep Sea Ecology and Technology, Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Celsiusstrasse 1, Bremen, D-28359, Germany; CNRS, Université Paul Sabatier, UMR5174 EDB, 118 route de Narbonne, Toulouse, F-31062, France.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus