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Electrically-driven modulation of surface-grafted RGD peptides for manipulation of cell adhesion.

Lashkor M, Rawson FJ, Stephenson-Brown A, Preece JA, Mendes PM - Chem. Commun. (Camb.) (2014)

Bottom Line: Reported herein is a switchable surface that relies on electrically-induced conformational changes within surface-grafted arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) oligopeptides as the means of modulating cell adhesion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. p.m.mendes@bham.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Reported herein is a switchable surface that relies on electrically-induced conformational changes within surface-grafted arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) oligopeptides as the means of modulating cell adhesion.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Schematic of the dynamic RDG oligopeptide SAM utilised for controlling specific cellular interactions. The electrically switchable SAM exposes the RGD peptide and supports cell adhesion under open circuit (OC) conditions (no applied potential), while under an applied negative potential the RGD is concealed, inhibiting cell adhesion. Below: chemical structures of the oligopeptides (C3K-GRGDS) and oligo(ethylene glycol) thiols (C11TEG) used for SAM preparation.
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fig1: Schematic of the dynamic RDG oligopeptide SAM utilised for controlling specific cellular interactions. The electrically switchable SAM exposes the RGD peptide and supports cell adhesion under open circuit (OC) conditions (no applied potential), while under an applied negative potential the RGD is concealed, inhibiting cell adhesion. Below: chemical structures of the oligopeptides (C3K-GRGDS) and oligo(ethylene glycol) thiols (C11TEG) used for SAM preparation.

Mentions: Herein, we report on a stimuli-responsive surface that relies on electrically-induced conformational changes within surface-grafted arginine–glycine–aspartate (RGD) oligopeptides as the means of modulating cell adhesion. RGD, which is present in most of the adhesive ECM proteins (e.g. fibronectin, vitronectin, laminin and collagen), is specific for integrin-mediated cell adhesion.38 The RGD modified electrode is used here to dynamically regulate the adhesion of immune macrophage cells. The stimuli-responsive surface is fabricated on a gold surface and comprises a mixed SAM consisting of two components (Fig. 1): (i) an oligopeptide containing a terminal cysteine for attachment to the gold surface, three lysine residues as the main switching unit, and a glycine–arginine–glycine–aspartate–serine (GRGDS) as the recognition motif for cell adhesion – C3K-GRGDS, and (ii) an ethylene glycol-terminated thiol (C11TEG) to space out the oligopeptides. Since the charged backbone of the oligopeptide can be potentially harnessed7–9 to induce its folding on the surface upon an application of an electrical potential, we reasoned that such conformational changes can be employed to selectively expose under open circuit (OC) conditions (bio-active state) or conceal under negative potential (bio-inactive state) the RGD to the cell and dynamically regulate cell adhesion.


Electrically-driven modulation of surface-grafted RGD peptides for manipulation of cell adhesion.

Lashkor M, Rawson FJ, Stephenson-Brown A, Preece JA, Mendes PM - Chem. Commun. (Camb.) (2014)

Schematic of the dynamic RDG oligopeptide SAM utilised for controlling specific cellular interactions. The electrically switchable SAM exposes the RGD peptide and supports cell adhesion under open circuit (OC) conditions (no applied potential), while under an applied negative potential the RGD is concealed, inhibiting cell adhesion. Below: chemical structures of the oligopeptides (C3K-GRGDS) and oligo(ethylene glycol) thiols (C11TEG) used for SAM preparation.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230383&req=5

fig1: Schematic of the dynamic RDG oligopeptide SAM utilised for controlling specific cellular interactions. The electrically switchable SAM exposes the RGD peptide and supports cell adhesion under open circuit (OC) conditions (no applied potential), while under an applied negative potential the RGD is concealed, inhibiting cell adhesion. Below: chemical structures of the oligopeptides (C3K-GRGDS) and oligo(ethylene glycol) thiols (C11TEG) used for SAM preparation.
Mentions: Herein, we report on a stimuli-responsive surface that relies on electrically-induced conformational changes within surface-grafted arginine–glycine–aspartate (RGD) oligopeptides as the means of modulating cell adhesion. RGD, which is present in most of the adhesive ECM proteins (e.g. fibronectin, vitronectin, laminin and collagen), is specific for integrin-mediated cell adhesion.38 The RGD modified electrode is used here to dynamically regulate the adhesion of immune macrophage cells. The stimuli-responsive surface is fabricated on a gold surface and comprises a mixed SAM consisting of two components (Fig. 1): (i) an oligopeptide containing a terminal cysteine for attachment to the gold surface, three lysine residues as the main switching unit, and a glycine–arginine–glycine–aspartate–serine (GRGDS) as the recognition motif for cell adhesion – C3K-GRGDS, and (ii) an ethylene glycol-terminated thiol (C11TEG) to space out the oligopeptides. Since the charged backbone of the oligopeptide can be potentially harnessed7–9 to induce its folding on the surface upon an application of an electrical potential, we reasoned that such conformational changes can be employed to selectively expose under open circuit (OC) conditions (bio-active state) or conceal under negative potential (bio-inactive state) the RGD to the cell and dynamically regulate cell adhesion.

Bottom Line: Reported herein is a switchable surface that relies on electrically-induced conformational changes within surface-grafted arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) oligopeptides as the means of modulating cell adhesion.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Chemical Engineering, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. p.m.mendes@bham.ac.uk.

ABSTRACT
Reported herein is a switchable surface that relies on electrically-induced conformational changes within surface-grafted arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) oligopeptides as the means of modulating cell adhesion.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus