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IMatter: validation of the NHS Scotland Employee Engagement Index.

Snowden A, MacArthur E - BMC Health Serv Res (2014)

Bottom Line: Factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure consistent with the following interpretation: iMatter showed evidence of high reliability and validity.It is a popular measure of staff engagement in NHS Scotland.Implications for practice focus on the importance of coproduction in psychometric development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Employee engagement is a fundamental component of quality healthcare. In order to provide empirical data of engagement in NHS Scotland an Employee Engagement Index was co-constructed with staff. 'iMatter' consists of 25 Likert questions developed iteratively from the literature and a series of validation events with NHS Scotland staff. The aim of this study was to test the face, content and construct validity of iMatter.

Methods: Cross sectional survey of NHS Scotland staff. In January 2013 iMatter was sent to 2300 staff across all disciplines in NHS Scotland. 1280 staff completed it. Demographic data were collected. Internal consistency of the scale was calculated. Construct validity consisted of concurrent application of factor analysis and Rasch analysis. Face and content validity were checked using 3 focus groups.

Results: The sample was representative of the NHSScotland population. iMatter showed very strong reliability (α = 0.958). Factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure consistent with the following interpretation:

Conclusions: iMatter showed evidence of high reliability and validity. It is a popular measure of staff engagement in NHS Scotland. Implications for practice focus on the importance of coproduction in psychometric development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Person ability and item difficulty.
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Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Fig4: Person ability and item difficulty.

Mentions: The principal component analysis generated four factors although there was crossloading on 6 items (Figure 4). Using the larger loading coefficient to generate an initial solution it can be seen that factor 1 entailed all the items except item 1 (2 to 11) from the section about ‘I/me’. Factor 2 entailed all the items about ‘my organisation’ (items 18 to 25). Factors 3 (items 12 to 14) and factor 4 (Items 1, 16 & 17) entailed the remaining questions. Four factors therefore best explained the principal component structure:


IMatter: validation of the NHS Scotland Employee Engagement Index.

Snowden A, MacArthur E - BMC Health Serv Res (2014)

Person ability and item difficulty.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230359&req=5

Fig4: Person ability and item difficulty.
Mentions: The principal component analysis generated four factors although there was crossloading on 6 items (Figure 4). Using the larger loading coefficient to generate an initial solution it can be seen that factor 1 entailed all the items except item 1 (2 to 11) from the section about ‘I/me’. Factor 2 entailed all the items about ‘my organisation’ (items 18 to 25). Factors 3 (items 12 to 14) and factor 4 (Items 1, 16 & 17) entailed the remaining questions. Four factors therefore best explained the principal component structure:

Bottom Line: Factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure consistent with the following interpretation: iMatter showed evidence of high reliability and validity.It is a popular measure of staff engagement in NHS Scotland.Implications for practice focus on the importance of coproduction in psychometric development.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

ABSTRACT

Background: Employee engagement is a fundamental component of quality healthcare. In order to provide empirical data of engagement in NHS Scotland an Employee Engagement Index was co-constructed with staff. 'iMatter' consists of 25 Likert questions developed iteratively from the literature and a series of validation events with NHS Scotland staff. The aim of this study was to test the face, content and construct validity of iMatter.

Methods: Cross sectional survey of NHS Scotland staff. In January 2013 iMatter was sent to 2300 staff across all disciplines in NHS Scotland. 1280 staff completed it. Demographic data were collected. Internal consistency of the scale was calculated. Construct validity consisted of concurrent application of factor analysis and Rasch analysis. Face and content validity were checked using 3 focus groups.

Results: The sample was representative of the NHSScotland population. iMatter showed very strong reliability (α = 0.958). Factor analysis revealed a four-factor structure consistent with the following interpretation:

Conclusions: iMatter showed evidence of high reliability and validity. It is a popular measure of staff engagement in NHS Scotland. Implications for practice focus on the importance of coproduction in psychometric development.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus