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Aripiprazole as augmentation therapy in bipolar patients with current minor or subsyndromal mood symptoms.

Schweitzer I, Sarris J, Tuckwell V, Maguire K, Smith D, Ng C - Int J Bipolar Disord (2013)

Bottom Line: For intention-to-treat data, there was a significant decrease in MADRS scores over the course of treatment, with a reduction of 6.40 points at endpoint (p < 0.0005).Improvement from baseline was significant at week 2 and remained through to week 8.Similarly, CGI-S scores significantly decreased over the course of study, but not YMRS scores.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, The Melbourne Clinic, 130 Church St, Richmond, 3121 Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation of maintenance treatment for bipolar disorder in patients with minor or subsyndromal mood episodes while on a stable dose of a mood stabiliser and/or antidepressant.

Methods: All subjects had a diagnosis of bipolar I or II disorder (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th Edition, Text Revision). Open-label aripiprazole was given over 8 weeks initially. The starting dose was 5 to 15 mg/day with a mean final dose of 11.5 mg (±4.6). Patients were assessed at weeks 0, 2, 4 and 8 with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S).

Results and discussion: Seventeen of 20 (85%) patients completed week 4, while 14 (70%) patients completed 8 weeks. For intention-to-treat data, there was a significant decrease in MADRS scores over the course of treatment, with a reduction of 6.40 points at endpoint (p < 0.0005). Improvement from baseline was significant at week 2 and remained through to week 8. Similarly, CGI-S scores significantly decreased over the course of study, but not YMRS scores. Aripiprazole was shown to be a modestly effective augmentation therapy for depressive symptoms in bipolar I and II in this small open-label study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

MADRS scores (means ± SD) from baseline to week 8. An asterisk indicates p < 0.0005 over time (ANOVA).
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Fig1: MADRS scores (means ± SD) from baseline to week 8. An asterisk indicates p < 0.0005 over time (ANOVA).

Mentions: There was a significant decrease in MADRS scores over the course of treatment (F = 11.17; df = 3, 17; p < 0.0005). The improvement from baseline was significant at week 2 and remained so through to week 8 (Figure 1). On intention-to-treat at study endpoint, pooled MADRS scores reduced from 20.45(±7.78) to 14.05(±8.68), with a reduction of 6.40 points. Similarly, CGI-S scores significantly decreased over the course of study (F = 15.84; df = 3, 17; p < 0.0005), and again, this was significant from week 2 through to week 8. No correlation was found between the dose of aripiprazole and reduction of MADRS or CGI-S scores. There was no significant difference in YMRS scores over the study. Observed case analysis resulted in similar findings. Eight (40%) patients met MADRS response criteria while seven (35%) patients were classified as MADRS remitters at the last evaluation, whereas seven (50%) of the 14 patients who completed 8 weeks were classified as both responders and remitters.Figure 1


Aripiprazole as augmentation therapy in bipolar patients with current minor or subsyndromal mood symptoms.

Schweitzer I, Sarris J, Tuckwell V, Maguire K, Smith D, Ng C - Int J Bipolar Disord (2013)

MADRS scores (means ± SD) from baseline to week 8. An asterisk indicates p < 0.0005 over time (ANOVA).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230314&req=5

Fig1: MADRS scores (means ± SD) from baseline to week 8. An asterisk indicates p < 0.0005 over time (ANOVA).
Mentions: There was a significant decrease in MADRS scores over the course of treatment (F = 11.17; df = 3, 17; p < 0.0005). The improvement from baseline was significant at week 2 and remained so through to week 8 (Figure 1). On intention-to-treat at study endpoint, pooled MADRS scores reduced from 20.45(±7.78) to 14.05(±8.68), with a reduction of 6.40 points. Similarly, CGI-S scores significantly decreased over the course of study (F = 15.84; df = 3, 17; p < 0.0005), and again, this was significant from week 2 through to week 8. No correlation was found between the dose of aripiprazole and reduction of MADRS or CGI-S scores. There was no significant difference in YMRS scores over the study. Observed case analysis resulted in similar findings. Eight (40%) patients met MADRS response criteria while seven (35%) patients were classified as MADRS remitters at the last evaluation, whereas seven (50%) of the 14 patients who completed 8 weeks were classified as both responders and remitters.Figure 1

Bottom Line: For intention-to-treat data, there was a significant decrease in MADRS scores over the course of treatment, with a reduction of 6.40 points at endpoint (p < 0.0005).Improvement from baseline was significant at week 2 and remained through to week 8.Similarly, CGI-S scores significantly decreased over the course of study, but not YMRS scores.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne, The Melbourne Clinic, 130 Church St, Richmond, 3121 Australia.

ABSTRACT

Background: This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of aripiprazole augmentation of maintenance treatment for bipolar disorder in patients with minor or subsyndromal mood episodes while on a stable dose of a mood stabiliser and/or antidepressant.

Methods: All subjects had a diagnosis of bipolar I or II disorder (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-4th Edition, Text Revision). Open-label aripiprazole was given over 8 weeks initially. The starting dose was 5 to 15 mg/day with a mean final dose of 11.5 mg (±4.6). Patients were assessed at weeks 0, 2, 4 and 8 with the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS), Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Clinical Global Impression of Severity (CGI-S).

Results and discussion: Seventeen of 20 (85%) patients completed week 4, while 14 (70%) patients completed 8 weeks. For intention-to-treat data, there was a significant decrease in MADRS scores over the course of treatment, with a reduction of 6.40 points at endpoint (p < 0.0005). Improvement from baseline was significant at week 2 and remained through to week 8. Similarly, CGI-S scores significantly decreased over the course of study, but not YMRS scores. Aripiprazole was shown to be a modestly effective augmentation therapy for depressive symptoms in bipolar I and II in this small open-label study.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus