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Occult hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplant patients in a Brazilian referral center.

Ferrari TC, Xavier MA, Vidigal PV, Amaral NS, Diniz PA, Resende AP, Miranda DM, Faria AC, Lima AS, Faria LC - Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons.The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years).In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
Estimates of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence varies among different studies depending on the prevalence of HBV infection in the study population and on the sensitivity of the assay used to detect HBV DNA. We investigated the prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Brazilian referral center. Frozen liver samples from 68 adults were analyzed using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HBV DNA. The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons. The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years). Occult HBV infection was diagnosed in three (4.4%) patients. The etiologies of the underlying chronic liver disease in these cases were alcohol abuse, HBV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of the patients with cryptic HBV infection also presented hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in two patients with occult HBV infection and were negative in both. In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population.

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Radar chart summarizing the distribution of occult hepatitis B virus infection(OBI), hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antibody(anti-HBs) according to the etiology of the underlying chronic liver disease. OBIwas observed in association with alcohol, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Anti-HBc was negative in more than 50% ofthe patients with the different causes of cirrhosis. Anti-HBs was negative in 50%of the cases of autoimmune liver disorders and in more than 50% of the patientswith the other causes of cirrhosis.
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f01: Radar chart summarizing the distribution of occult hepatitis B virus infection(OBI), hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antibody(anti-HBs) according to the etiology of the underlying chronic liver disease. OBIwas observed in association with alcohol, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Anti-HBc was negative in more than 50% ofthe patients with the different causes of cirrhosis. Anti-HBs was negative in 50%of the cases of autoimmune liver disorders and in more than 50% of the patientswith the other causes of cirrhosis.

Mentions: OBI was diagnosed in 3 (4.4%) patients in whom the etiologies of the underlying chronicliver disease were alcohol abuse, HCV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of theseindividuals also presented with HCC; and in 1 patient, the tumor was only diagnosed inthe explanted liver. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in 2 of the OBIpatients and were negative in both (Figure 1). TheHBV genome was identified exclusively in nontumor tissue. The preS-S region wasamplified in all HBV-positive samples, whereas the precore-core region was absent in allof them.


Occult hepatitis B virus infection in liver transplant patients in a Brazilian referral center.

Ferrari TC, Xavier MA, Vidigal PV, Amaral NS, Diniz PA, Resende AP, Miranda DM, Faria AC, Lima AS, Faria LC - Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. (2014)

Radar chart summarizing the distribution of occult hepatitis B virus infection(OBI), hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antibody(anti-HBs) according to the etiology of the underlying chronic liver disease. OBIwas observed in association with alcohol, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Anti-HBc was negative in more than 50% ofthe patients with the different causes of cirrhosis. Anti-HBs was negative in 50%of the cases of autoimmune liver disorders and in more than 50% of the patientswith the other causes of cirrhosis.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230290&req=5

f01: Radar chart summarizing the distribution of occult hepatitis B virus infection(OBI), hepatitis B core antibody (anti-HBc) and hepatitis B surface antibody(anti-HBs) according to the etiology of the underlying chronic liver disease. OBIwas observed in association with alcohol, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Anti-HBc was negative in more than 50% ofthe patients with the different causes of cirrhosis. Anti-HBs was negative in 50%of the cases of autoimmune liver disorders and in more than 50% of the patientswith the other causes of cirrhosis.
Mentions: OBI was diagnosed in 3 (4.4%) patients in whom the etiologies of the underlying chronicliver disease were alcohol abuse, HCV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of theseindividuals also presented with HCC; and in 1 patient, the tumor was only diagnosed inthe explanted liver. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in 2 of the OBIpatients and were negative in both (Figure 1). TheHBV genome was identified exclusively in nontumor tissue. The preS-S region wasamplified in all HBV-positive samples, whereas the precore-core region was absent in allof them.

Bottom Line: The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons.The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years).In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Departamento de Clínica Médica, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brasil.

ABSTRACT
Estimates of occult hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection prevalence varies among different studies depending on the prevalence of HBV infection in the study population and on the sensitivity of the assay used to detect HBV DNA. We investigated the prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplantation in a Brazilian referral center. Frozen liver samples from 68 adults were analyzed using a nested polymerase chain reaction assay for HBV DNA. The specificity of the amplified HBV sequences was confirmed by direct sequencing of the amplicons. The patient population comprised 49 (72.1%) males and 19 (27.9%) females with a median age of 53 years (range=18-67 years). Occult HBV infection was diagnosed in three (4.4%) patients. The etiologies of the underlying chronic liver disease in these cases were alcohol abuse, HBV infection, and cryptogenic cirrhosis. Two of the patients with cryptic HBV infection also presented hepatocellular carcinoma. Markers of previous HBV infection were available in two patients with occult HBV infection and were negative in both. In conclusion, using a sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay to detect HBV DNA in frozen liver tissue, we found a low prevalence of occult HBV infection in cirrhotic patients undergoing liver transplant, probably due to the low prevalence of HBV infection in our population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus