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Relationship between pulmonary function and indoor air pollution from coal combustion among adult residents in an inner-city area of southwest China.

Jie Y, Houjin H, Xun M, Kebin L, Xuesong Y, Jie X - Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers.There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group.These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Few studies evaluate the amount of particulate matter less than 2.5 mm in diameter (PM₂.₅) in relation to a change in lung function among adults in a population. The aim of this study was to assess the association of coal as a domestic energy source to pulmonary function in an adult population in inner-city areas of Zunyi city in China where coal use is common. In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers. Several sociodemographic factors were assessed by questionnaire, and ventilatory function measurements including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV₁), the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were compared between the 2 groups. The amount of PM₂.₅ was also measured in all residences. There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group. In multivariate analysis, current exposure to coal smoke was associated with a 31.7% decrease in FVC, a 42.0% decrease in FEV₁, a 7.46% decrease in the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and a 23.1% decrease in PEFR in adult residents. The slope of lung function decrease for Chinese adults is approximately a 2-L decrease in FVC, a 3-L decrease in FEV₁, and an 8 L/s decrease in PEFR per count per minute of PM₂.₅ exposure. These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

PM2.5 relative concentration according to coal exposed andunexposed groups. *P<0.05, t-test.
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f02: PM2.5 relative concentration according to coal exposed andunexposed groups. *P<0.05, t-test.

Mentions: To measure PM2.5 concentrations inside and outside the households, we useda digital dust monitor (LD-3K; Sibata Scientific Technology Inc., Japan; Figure 2), which is a portable monitor based onthe light-scattering principle, with a laser diode as the light source. The monitordetermines the relative concentration of PM2.5 by measuring the intensityof the laser beam scattered by particles. The advantage of measuring PM2.5relative concentration with the LD-3K fine dust monitor was that it allowed ananalysis of concentration level (high or low), namely, a relative comparison(screening) and an analysis of variation with time (17). The relative concentration is reported as counts per minute (cpm). Todetermine the cpm, the following equation was used: cpm = count value/measuring time(in min). Each measurement was maintained for over 1 min, and three readings weretaken for each measurement to calculate the mean relative concentration. There was aninterval period of 1 min between the 3 measurements of PM2.5 in thekitchen, living room, or outdoors, whereas the interval period for measurementsbetween the kitchen, living room, and outdoors was 5 min in each house.


Relationship between pulmonary function and indoor air pollution from coal combustion among adult residents in an inner-city area of southwest China.

Jie Y, Houjin H, Xun M, Kebin L, Xuesong Y, Jie X - Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. (2014)

PM2.5 relative concentration according to coal exposed andunexposed groups. *P<0.05, t-test.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230289&req=5

f02: PM2.5 relative concentration according to coal exposed andunexposed groups. *P<0.05, t-test.
Mentions: To measure PM2.5 concentrations inside and outside the households, we useda digital dust monitor (LD-3K; Sibata Scientific Technology Inc., Japan; Figure 2), which is a portable monitor based onthe light-scattering principle, with a laser diode as the light source. The monitordetermines the relative concentration of PM2.5 by measuring the intensityof the laser beam scattered by particles. The advantage of measuring PM2.5relative concentration with the LD-3K fine dust monitor was that it allowed ananalysis of concentration level (high or low), namely, a relative comparison(screening) and an analysis of variation with time (17). The relative concentration is reported as counts per minute (cpm). Todetermine the cpm, the following equation was used: cpm = count value/measuring time(in min). Each measurement was maintained for over 1 min, and three readings weretaken for each measurement to calculate the mean relative concentration. There was aninterval period of 1 min between the 3 measurements of PM2.5 in thekitchen, living room, or outdoors, whereas the interval period for measurementsbetween the kitchen, living room, and outdoors was 5 min in each house.

Bottom Line: In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers.There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group.These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Few studies evaluate the amount of particulate matter less than 2.5 mm in diameter (PM₂.₅) in relation to a change in lung function among adults in a population. The aim of this study was to assess the association of coal as a domestic energy source to pulmonary function in an adult population in inner-city areas of Zunyi city in China where coal use is common. In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers. Several sociodemographic factors were assessed by questionnaire, and ventilatory function measurements including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV₁), the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were compared between the 2 groups. The amount of PM₂.₅ was also measured in all residences. There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group. In multivariate analysis, current exposure to coal smoke was associated with a 31.7% decrease in FVC, a 42.0% decrease in FEV₁, a 7.46% decrease in the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and a 23.1% decrease in PEFR in adult residents. The slope of lung function decrease for Chinese adults is approximately a 2-L decrease in FVC, a 3-L decrease in FEV₁, and an 8 L/s decrease in PEFR per count per minute of PM₂.₅ exposure. These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus