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Relationship between pulmonary function and indoor air pollution from coal combustion among adult residents in an inner-city area of southwest China.

Jie Y, Houjin H, Xun M, Kebin L, Xuesong Y, Jie X - Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. (2014)

Bottom Line: In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers.There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group.These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Few studies evaluate the amount of particulate matter less than 2.5 mm in diameter (PM₂.₅) in relation to a change in lung function among adults in a population. The aim of this study was to assess the association of coal as a domestic energy source to pulmonary function in an adult population in inner-city areas of Zunyi city in China where coal use is common. In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers. Several sociodemographic factors were assessed by questionnaire, and ventilatory function measurements including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV₁), the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were compared between the 2 groups. The amount of PM₂.₅ was also measured in all residences. There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group. In multivariate analysis, current exposure to coal smoke was associated with a 31.7% decrease in FVC, a 42.0% decrease in FEV₁, a 7.46% decrease in the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and a 23.1% decrease in PEFR in adult residents. The slope of lung function decrease for Chinese adults is approximately a 2-L decrease in FVC, a 3-L decrease in FEV₁, and an 8 L/s decrease in PEFR per count per minute of PM₂.₅ exposure. These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Map of the selected area (Zunyi city) in Guizhou province, China.
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f01: Map of the selected area (Zunyi city) in Guizhou province, China.

Mentions: Zunyi city possesses abundant coal reserves, is the city most seriously polluted by acidrain, and has record high levels of air pollution in China (Figure 1). In the inner-city areas of Zunyi, biomass fuels have beenwidely replaced at home by cleaner energy sources, such as kerosene, liquid petroleum,gas, or electricity, but coal is still a major source of fuel for cooking and heatingthroughout the year, particularly in the winter. These conditions prompted us toinvestigate the impact of coal use on pulmonary function among adult residents in aninner-city area of Zunyi. The objective of this study was to assess the relationshipbetween pulmonary function changes in the adult population and IAP from coal use ininner-city areas of Zunyi city, Guizhou province, in southwest China.


Relationship between pulmonary function and indoor air pollution from coal combustion among adult residents in an inner-city area of southwest China.

Jie Y, Houjin H, Xun M, Kebin L, Xuesong Y, Jie X - Braz. J. Med. Biol. Res. (2014)

Map of the selected area (Zunyi city) in Guizhou province, China.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230289&req=5

f01: Map of the selected area (Zunyi city) in Guizhou province, China.
Mentions: Zunyi city possesses abundant coal reserves, is the city most seriously polluted by acidrain, and has record high levels of air pollution in China (Figure 1). In the inner-city areas of Zunyi, biomass fuels have beenwidely replaced at home by cleaner energy sources, such as kerosene, liquid petroleum,gas, or electricity, but coal is still a major source of fuel for cooking and heatingthroughout the year, particularly in the winter. These conditions prompted us toinvestigate the impact of coal use on pulmonary function among adult residents in aninner-city area of Zunyi. The objective of this study was to assess the relationshipbetween pulmonary function changes in the adult population and IAP from coal use ininner-city areas of Zunyi city, Guizhou province, in southwest China.

Bottom Line: In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers.There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group.These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Public Health, Zunyi Medical University, Zunyi, Guizhou, China.

ABSTRACT
Few studies evaluate the amount of particulate matter less than 2.5 mm in diameter (PM₂.₅) in relation to a change in lung function among adults in a population. The aim of this study was to assess the association of coal as a domestic energy source to pulmonary function in an adult population in inner-city areas of Zunyi city in China where coal use is common. In a cross-sectional study of 104 households, pulmonary function measurements were assessed and compared in 110 coal users and 121 non-coal users (≥18 years old) who were all nonsmokers. Several sociodemographic factors were assessed by questionnaire, and ventilatory function measurements including forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV₁), the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were compared between the 2 groups. The amount of PM₂.₅ was also measured in all residences. There was a significant increase in the relative concentration of PM₂.₅ in the indoor kitchens and living rooms of the coal-exposed group compared to the non-coal-exposed group. In multivariate analysis, current exposure to coal smoke was associated with a 31.7% decrease in FVC, a 42.0% decrease in FEV₁, a 7.46% decrease in the FEV₁/FVC ratio, and a 23.1% decrease in PEFR in adult residents. The slope of lung function decrease for Chinese adults is approximately a 2-L decrease in FVC, a 3-L decrease in FEV₁, and an 8 L/s decrease in PEFR per count per minute of PM₂.₅ exposure. These results demonstrate the harmful effects of indoor air pollution from coal smoke on the lung function of adult residents and emphasize the need for public health efforts to decrease exposure to coal smoke.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus