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The processing of faces across non-rigid facial transformation develops at 7 month of age: a fNIRS-adaptation study.

Kobayashi M, Otsuka Y, Kanazawa S, Yamaguchi MK, Kakigi R - BMC Neurosci (2014)

Bottom Line: In addition, we revealed that size-invariant processing of facial identity develops by 5 months of age (NR 23:984-988, 2012), while view-invariant processing develops around 7 months of age (FiHN 5:153, 2011).The aim in the current study was to examine whether infants' brains process facial identity across the non-rigid transformation of facial features by using the neural adaptation paradigm.Our results suggest that the processing of facial identity with non-rigid facial transformation develops around 7 months after birth.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, 38 Nishigo-Naka, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585, Japan. megumik@nips.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), our previous neural adaptation studies found that infants' bilateral temporal regions process facial identity (FiHN 5:153, 2011). In addition, we revealed that size-invariant processing of facial identity develops by 5 months of age (NR 23:984-988, 2012), while view-invariant processing develops around 7 months of age (FiHN 5:153, 2011). The aim in the current study was to examine whether infants' brains process facial identity across the non-rigid transformation of facial features by using the neural adaptation paradigm. We used NIRS to compare hemodynamic changes in the bilateral temporal areas of 5- to 6-month-olds and 7- to 8-month-olds during presentations of an identical face and of different faces.

Results: We found that (1) the oxyhemoglobin concentration around the T5 and T6 positions increased significantly during the presentation of different faces only in 7- to 8-month-olds and (2) 7- to 8-month-olds, but not 5- to 6-month-olds, showed attenuation in these channels to the presentation of the same face rather than to the presentation of different faces, regardless of non-rigid changes in facial features.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the processing of facial identity with non-rigid facial transformation develops around 7 months after birth.

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Example of face stimuli. These images contain the following facial gestures: neutral, smiling, opening mouth, puckering, and puffing cheeks. (The individual provided written informed consent for publication of these images.).
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Figure 3: Example of face stimuli. These images contain the following facial gestures: neutral, smiling, opening mouth, puckering, and puffing cheeks. (The individual provided written informed consent for publication of these images.).

Mentions: The stimuli for the test period consisted of 25 full-color photographs of five different Japanese adult female faces in a frontal viewpoint. There were five images of each female with different facial gestures: neutral, smiling, opening mouth, puckering, and puffing cheeks (Figure 3). The RGB content of the facial images (histogram for each channel) was equated across the five female faces using SHINE Toolbox (Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada; http://www.mapageweb.umontreal.ca/gosselif/shine/) [25]. The stimuli for the baseline period consisted of full-color photo images of the five vegetables used in our previous studies [1-4,6,8,9,26]. The sizes of the stimuli were approximately 17.5° × 21° in visual angle for the faces, and 16.8° × 16.8° for the vegetables.


The processing of faces across non-rigid facial transformation develops at 7 month of age: a fNIRS-adaptation study.

Kobayashi M, Otsuka Y, Kanazawa S, Yamaguchi MK, Kakigi R - BMC Neurosci (2014)

Example of face stimuli. These images contain the following facial gestures: neutral, smiling, opening mouth, puckering, and puffing cheeks. (The individual provided written informed consent for publication of these images.).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230271&req=5

Figure 3: Example of face stimuli. These images contain the following facial gestures: neutral, smiling, opening mouth, puckering, and puffing cheeks. (The individual provided written informed consent for publication of these images.).
Mentions: The stimuli for the test period consisted of 25 full-color photographs of five different Japanese adult female faces in a frontal viewpoint. There were five images of each female with different facial gestures: neutral, smiling, opening mouth, puckering, and puffing cheeks (Figure 3). The RGB content of the facial images (histogram for each channel) was equated across the five female faces using SHINE Toolbox (Université de Montréal, Montréal, Québec, Canada; http://www.mapageweb.umontreal.ca/gosselif/shine/) [25]. The stimuli for the baseline period consisted of full-color photo images of the five vegetables used in our previous studies [1-4,6,8,9,26]. The sizes of the stimuli were approximately 17.5° × 21° in visual angle for the faces, and 16.8° × 16.8° for the vegetables.

Bottom Line: In addition, we revealed that size-invariant processing of facial identity develops by 5 months of age (NR 23:984-988, 2012), while view-invariant processing develops around 7 months of age (FiHN 5:153, 2011).The aim in the current study was to examine whether infants' brains process facial identity across the non-rigid transformation of facial features by using the neural adaptation paradigm.Our results suggest that the processing of facial identity with non-rigid facial transformation develops around 7 months after birth.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Integrative Physiology, National Institute for Physiological Sciences, 38 Nishigo-Naka, Myodaiji, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585, Japan. megumik@nips.ac.jp.

ABSTRACT

Background: Using near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS), our previous neural adaptation studies found that infants' bilateral temporal regions process facial identity (FiHN 5:153, 2011). In addition, we revealed that size-invariant processing of facial identity develops by 5 months of age (NR 23:984-988, 2012), while view-invariant processing develops around 7 months of age (FiHN 5:153, 2011). The aim in the current study was to examine whether infants' brains process facial identity across the non-rigid transformation of facial features by using the neural adaptation paradigm. We used NIRS to compare hemodynamic changes in the bilateral temporal areas of 5- to 6-month-olds and 7- to 8-month-olds during presentations of an identical face and of different faces.

Results: We found that (1) the oxyhemoglobin concentration around the T5 and T6 positions increased significantly during the presentation of different faces only in 7- to 8-month-olds and (2) 7- to 8-month-olds, but not 5- to 6-month-olds, showed attenuation in these channels to the presentation of the same face rather than to the presentation of different faces, regardless of non-rigid changes in facial features.

Conclusions: Our results suggest that the processing of facial identity with non-rigid facial transformation develops around 7 months after birth.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus