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Diagnosis of ophthalmomyiasis externa by dermatoscopy.

Naimer SA, Mumcuoglu KY - Dermatol Pract Concept (2014)

Bottom Line: Ophthalmomyiasis in humans caused by the larvae of the sheep nasal botfly (Oestrus ovis) and is a rare phenomenon in Israel.After the physical removal of the larvae with the help of a cotton swab applicator under a slit lamp examination and the topical use of antibiotics, the clinical symptoms improved within 1-2 days.Undoubtedly the dermatoscope played a crucial role leading to the definitive diagnosis and immediate therapeutic intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva; Elon Moreh Clinic, Clalit Health Services, Shomron district, Lev Shomron, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Ophthalmomyiasis in humans caused by the larvae of the sheep nasal botfly (Oestrus ovis) and is a rare phenomenon in Israel. We describe the utilization of the dermatoscope as a diagnostic tool for the facilitation of early diagnosis of conjunctivitis due to the infestation of the eyes by the sheep nasal botfly in two patients. After the physical removal of the larvae with the help of a cotton swab applicator under a slit lamp examination and the topical use of antibiotics, the clinical symptoms improved within 1-2 days. Undoubtedly the dermatoscope played a crucial role leading to the definitive diagnosis and immediate therapeutic intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Solitary horizontal Oestrus ovis larva in the conjunctival fornix of the left eye. Zoom photography from smartphone mounted over a Dermlite 3 (trademark) polarized dermatoscope. (Copyright: ©2014 Naimer et al.)
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f1-dp0404a19: Solitary horizontal Oestrus ovis larva in the conjunctival fornix of the left eye. Zoom photography from smartphone mounted over a Dermlite 3 (trademark) polarized dermatoscope. (Copyright: ©2014 Naimer et al.)

Mentions: A 27-year- old male was standing outdoors when suddenly he felt an insect hit his left eye at high velocity. Soon afterwards he complained of a stinging sensation, pain and uncontrollable tearing. Upon arrival at the clinic an hour after this incident, the patient seemed anxious. His eye was covered with his hand. Physical examination disclosed a red left eye with swollen and erythematous palpebra and profuse epiphora. The conjunctivae were fiery red and the bulbar conjunctiva demonstrated significant flushing with ciliary injection. At first, with unassisted examination any trigger or cause leading to this condition was hardly discernible. However, after administering topical anesthetic drops and applying polarized dermatoscopic inspection, a number of larvae were observed escaping the light shone across the eye surface and crawling into the conjunctival fornices (Figure 1). A smartphone was mounted onto the eyepiece of the dermatoscope and the zoom photography mode enabled further magnification. With a cotton swab applicator under the illumination of the device, six larvae were removed and placed in formalin. The abundance of the organisms precluded their removal under these conditions and therefore the patient was referred for a slit lamp examination at the emergency department of Beilinson Hospital, where 14 additional larvae were removed from the eye. The patient was released after application of chloramphenicol eye ointment with ocular covering.


Diagnosis of ophthalmomyiasis externa by dermatoscopy.

Naimer SA, Mumcuoglu KY - Dermatol Pract Concept (2014)

Solitary horizontal Oestrus ovis larva in the conjunctival fornix of the left eye. Zoom photography from smartphone mounted over a Dermlite 3 (trademark) polarized dermatoscope. (Copyright: ©2014 Naimer et al.)
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230269&req=5

f1-dp0404a19: Solitary horizontal Oestrus ovis larva in the conjunctival fornix of the left eye. Zoom photography from smartphone mounted over a Dermlite 3 (trademark) polarized dermatoscope. (Copyright: ©2014 Naimer et al.)
Mentions: A 27-year- old male was standing outdoors when suddenly he felt an insect hit his left eye at high velocity. Soon afterwards he complained of a stinging sensation, pain and uncontrollable tearing. Upon arrival at the clinic an hour after this incident, the patient seemed anxious. His eye was covered with his hand. Physical examination disclosed a red left eye with swollen and erythematous palpebra and profuse epiphora. The conjunctivae were fiery red and the bulbar conjunctiva demonstrated significant flushing with ciliary injection. At first, with unassisted examination any trigger or cause leading to this condition was hardly discernible. However, after administering topical anesthetic drops and applying polarized dermatoscopic inspection, a number of larvae were observed escaping the light shone across the eye surface and crawling into the conjunctival fornices (Figure 1). A smartphone was mounted onto the eyepiece of the dermatoscope and the zoom photography mode enabled further magnification. With a cotton swab applicator under the illumination of the device, six larvae were removed and placed in formalin. The abundance of the organisms precluded their removal under these conditions and therefore the patient was referred for a slit lamp examination at the emergency department of Beilinson Hospital, where 14 additional larvae were removed from the eye. The patient was released after application of chloramphenicol eye ointment with ocular covering.

Bottom Line: Ophthalmomyiasis in humans caused by the larvae of the sheep nasal botfly (Oestrus ovis) and is a rare phenomenon in Israel.After the physical removal of the larvae with the help of a cotton swab applicator under a slit lamp examination and the topical use of antibiotics, the clinical symptoms improved within 1-2 days.Undoubtedly the dermatoscope played a crucial role leading to the definitive diagnosis and immediate therapeutic intervention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Family Medicine, Siaal Research Center for Family Medicine and Primary Care Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva; Elon Moreh Clinic, Clalit Health Services, Shomron district, Lev Shomron, Israel.

ABSTRACT
Ophthalmomyiasis in humans caused by the larvae of the sheep nasal botfly (Oestrus ovis) and is a rare phenomenon in Israel. We describe the utilization of the dermatoscope as a diagnostic tool for the facilitation of early diagnosis of conjunctivitis due to the infestation of the eyes by the sheep nasal botfly in two patients. After the physical removal of the larvae with the help of a cotton swab applicator under a slit lamp examination and the topical use of antibiotics, the clinical symptoms improved within 1-2 days. Undoubtedly the dermatoscope played a crucial role leading to the definitive diagnosis and immediate therapeutic intervention.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus