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Review: Skin Lymphoma. The Illustrated Guide, 4th edition, by Lorenzo Cerroni

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Lorenzo Cerroni is the sole author of the fourth edition of this wonderful book on a most difficult, complex and confusing subject: cutaneous lymphoma... The former three editions were co-authored by Helmut Kerl, who recently retired, and Kevin Gatter, who now focuses on his work on bone marrow diagnosis... I do not doubt for a single second that Dr. Cerroni’s task has been, as stated by him, “Herculean. ” The book is remarkably organized and presented... The various lesions are grouped under the following headings: (1) NK/T-cell lymphomas, (2) B-cell lymphomas, (3) Lymphomas in immunosuppressed individuals, (4) Leukemias and precursor hematologic neoplasms, (5) Hodgkin’s lymphoma, (6) Lymphomas in children and adolescents, (7) Pseudolymphomas and (8) “atypical lymphoid proliferation. ” In this last section, neoplasms and lesions hard to categorize are discussed... These neoplasms either do not fit into a defined category or their benignancy/malignancy is undecidable... For example, intravascular large cell lymphomas of the B, T and CD30 lineages are included in section 2 on B-cell lymphomas, whereas in the third edition they were classified, together with lymphomas in immunosuppressed individuals, in section 3 devoted to “Other cutaneous lymphomas” (a section that no longer exists, having been replaced by a new section 3 devoted to lymphomas [B-cell and T-cell] developed in immunosup-pressed individuals)... There is a name for such a statement: oxymoron... And what should one think of this “definition” of mycosis fungoides to be found on page 11: It is defined as [emphasis mine] a tumor composed of small/medium-sized, epidermotropic T-helper lymphocytes (but T-cytotoxic variants are not uncommon and tumor cells may be medium/large in advanced stages)... After comparing this definition with that proposed in our opus, the reader is invited to conclude: Although our definition can be and has been criticized as overly inclusive, the protean character of mycosis fungoides is acknowledge by Dr. Cerroni, who lists the following variants of MF, clinical and histological: parapsoriasis, folliculo-tropic (with or without follicular mucinosis), syringotropic, localized pagetoid, unilesional, granulomatous, slack skin, erythrodermic, interstitial, poikilodermic, hypopigmented, hyperpigmented, purpuric, papular, bullous, anetodermic, PLEVA-like, “invisible,” etc... Incidently, one should rejoice since it is clearly admitted at last (pages 34–35) that parapsoriasis, be it of the small or large plaque type, is mycosis fungoides even though the author continues to insist on the fact that “regardless of the academic discussion, it is important to underline that patients with small plaque parapsoriasis should not be aggressively treated. ” This is evident and true not only for small-plaque parapsoriasis but also for any clinically indolent lymphoma, even for any indolent neoplasm of any type... Considering unilesional T-cell lymphoma, for instance, is it justified, as does Cerroni, to subdivide it into (1) pagetoid reticulosis (with massive epidermotropism), (2) CD4+ small and medium T-cell lymphoma (with very little or no epidermotropism and diffuse dermal infiltration), (3) “genuine” unilesional MF (defined clinically), and (4) solitary MF with large cell transformation (Teaching case 2.2, page 63), a supposedly “worrying feature” even if the patient remains in complete remission, one year after treatment? In a word, I warmly recommend this book that deals exhaustively with a very difficult subject... It can be very useful on a day-to-day basis but certainly has to be read with discernment.

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Cerroni L. Skin Lymphoma. TheIllustrated Guide. 4th ed. Wiley-Blackwell 2014. ISBN 978-1-118-49249-9. 425 pages. $219.95
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Review: Skin Lymphoma. The Illustrated Guide, 4th edition, by Lorenzo Cerroni
Cerroni L. Skin Lymphoma. TheIllustrated Guide. 4th ed. Wiley-Blackwell 2014. ISBN 978-1-118-49249-9. 425 pages. $219.95
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230267&req=5

f1-dp0404a17: Cerroni L. Skin Lymphoma. TheIllustrated Guide. 4th ed. Wiley-Blackwell 2014. ISBN 978-1-118-49249-9. 425 pages. $219.95

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Lorenzo Cerroni is the sole author of the fourth edition of this wonderful book on a most difficult, complex and confusing subject: cutaneous lymphoma... The former three editions were co-authored by Helmut Kerl, who recently retired, and Kevin Gatter, who now focuses on his work on bone marrow diagnosis... I do not doubt for a single second that Dr. Cerroni’s task has been, as stated by him, “Herculean. ” The book is remarkably organized and presented... The various lesions are grouped under the following headings: (1) NK/T-cell lymphomas, (2) B-cell lymphomas, (3) Lymphomas in immunosuppressed individuals, (4) Leukemias and precursor hematologic neoplasms, (5) Hodgkin’s lymphoma, (6) Lymphomas in children and adolescents, (7) Pseudolymphomas and (8) “atypical lymphoid proliferation. ” In this last section, neoplasms and lesions hard to categorize are discussed... These neoplasms either do not fit into a defined category or their benignancy/malignancy is undecidable... For example, intravascular large cell lymphomas of the B, T and CD30 lineages are included in section 2 on B-cell lymphomas, whereas in the third edition they were classified, together with lymphomas in immunosuppressed individuals, in section 3 devoted to “Other cutaneous lymphomas” (a section that no longer exists, having been replaced by a new section 3 devoted to lymphomas [B-cell and T-cell] developed in immunosup-pressed individuals)... There is a name for such a statement: oxymoron... And what should one think of this “definition” of mycosis fungoides to be found on page 11: It is defined as [emphasis mine] a tumor composed of small/medium-sized, epidermotropic T-helper lymphocytes (but T-cytotoxic variants are not uncommon and tumor cells may be medium/large in advanced stages)... After comparing this definition with that proposed in our opus, the reader is invited to conclude: Although our definition can be and has been criticized as overly inclusive, the protean character of mycosis fungoides is acknowledge by Dr. Cerroni, who lists the following variants of MF, clinical and histological: parapsoriasis, folliculo-tropic (with or without follicular mucinosis), syringotropic, localized pagetoid, unilesional, granulomatous, slack skin, erythrodermic, interstitial, poikilodermic, hypopigmented, hyperpigmented, purpuric, papular, bullous, anetodermic, PLEVA-like, “invisible,” etc... Incidently, one should rejoice since it is clearly admitted at last (pages 34–35) that parapsoriasis, be it of the small or large plaque type, is mycosis fungoides even though the author continues to insist on the fact that “regardless of the academic discussion, it is important to underline that patients with small plaque parapsoriasis should not be aggressively treated. ” This is evident and true not only for small-plaque parapsoriasis but also for any clinically indolent lymphoma, even for any indolent neoplasm of any type... Considering unilesional T-cell lymphoma, for instance, is it justified, as does Cerroni, to subdivide it into (1) pagetoid reticulosis (with massive epidermotropism), (2) CD4+ small and medium T-cell lymphoma (with very little or no epidermotropism and diffuse dermal infiltration), (3) “genuine” unilesional MF (defined clinically), and (4) solitary MF with large cell transformation (Teaching case 2.2, page 63), a supposedly “worrying feature” even if the patient remains in complete remission, one year after treatment? In a word, I warmly recommend this book that deals exhaustively with a very difficult subject... It can be very useful on a day-to-day basis but certainly has to be read with discernment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus