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Burnout in medical residents: a study based on the job demands-resources model.

Zis P, Anagnostopoulos F, Sykioti P - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: In total 14.4% of the residents were found to experience burnout.Conversely, each increased point for autonomy, opportunities in professional development, and each extra resident per specialist were associated with a decrease in the odds of burnout by 37.1%, 39.4%, and 59.0%, respectively.Burnout among medical residents is associated with home-work interface, autonomy, professional development, and resident to specialist ratio.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Evangelismos General Hospital, 10676 Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Burnout is a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job. The purpose of our cross-sectional study was to estimate the burnout rates among medical residents in the largest Greek hospital in 2012 and identify factors associated with it, based on the job demands-resources model (JD-R).

Method: Job demands were examined via a 17-item questionnaire assessing 4 characteristics (emotional demands, intellectual demands, workload, and home-work demands' interface) and job resources were measured via a 14-item questionnaire assessing 4 characteristics (autonomy, opportunities for professional development, support from colleagues, and supervisor's support). The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used to measure burnout.

Results: Of the 290 eligible residents, 90.7% responded. In total 14.4% of the residents were found to experience burnout. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that each increased point in the JD-R questionnaire score regarding home-work interface was associated with an increase in the odds of burnout by 25.5%. Conversely, each increased point for autonomy, opportunities in professional development, and each extra resident per specialist were associated with a decrease in the odds of burnout by 37.1%, 39.4%, and 59.0%, respectively.

Conclusions: Burnout among medical residents is associated with home-work interface, autonomy, professional development, and resident to specialist ratio.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Conceptual model of residents' burnout adopted in our study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection


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fig1: Conceptual model of residents' burnout adopted in our study.

Mentions: The conceptual diagram of the model adopted in our study is shown in Figure 1. A database was developed using the statistical software package SPSS (version 16.0 for Mac; SPSS). Frequencies and descriptive statistics were examined for each variable. Statistical comparisons were performed between the “burned out” residents and the “nonburned out” residents concerning demographic characteristics, job demands and resources, and other work-related factors. Dichotomous variables were compared with the chi-square test, normally distributed continuous variables by using Student's t-test and nonnormally distributed continuous variables by using Mann-Whitney's U test.


Burnout in medical residents: a study based on the job demands-resources model.

Zis P, Anagnostopoulos F, Sykioti P - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Conceptual model of residents' burnout adopted in our study.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230205&req=5

fig1: Conceptual model of residents' burnout adopted in our study.
Mentions: The conceptual diagram of the model adopted in our study is shown in Figure 1. A database was developed using the statistical software package SPSS (version 16.0 for Mac; SPSS). Frequencies and descriptive statistics were examined for each variable. Statistical comparisons were performed between the “burned out” residents and the “nonburned out” residents concerning demographic characteristics, job demands and resources, and other work-related factors. Dichotomous variables were compared with the chi-square test, normally distributed continuous variables by using Student's t-test and nonnormally distributed continuous variables by using Mann-Whitney's U test.

Bottom Line: In total 14.4% of the residents were found to experience burnout.Conversely, each increased point for autonomy, opportunities in professional development, and each extra resident per specialist were associated with a decrease in the odds of burnout by 37.1%, 39.4%, and 59.0%, respectively.Burnout among medical residents is associated with home-work interface, autonomy, professional development, and resident to specialist ratio.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Evangelismos General Hospital, 10676 Athens, Greece.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Burnout is a prolonged response to chronic emotional and interpersonal stressors on the job. The purpose of our cross-sectional study was to estimate the burnout rates among medical residents in the largest Greek hospital in 2012 and identify factors associated with it, based on the job demands-resources model (JD-R).

Method: Job demands were examined via a 17-item questionnaire assessing 4 characteristics (emotional demands, intellectual demands, workload, and home-work demands' interface) and job resources were measured via a 14-item questionnaire assessing 4 characteristics (autonomy, opportunities for professional development, support from colleagues, and supervisor's support). The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used to measure burnout.

Results: Of the 290 eligible residents, 90.7% responded. In total 14.4% of the residents were found to experience burnout. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed that each increased point in the JD-R questionnaire score regarding home-work interface was associated with an increase in the odds of burnout by 25.5%. Conversely, each increased point for autonomy, opportunities in professional development, and each extra resident per specialist were associated with a decrease in the odds of burnout by 37.1%, 39.4%, and 59.0%, respectively.

Conclusions: Burnout among medical residents is associated with home-work interface, autonomy, professional development, and resident to specialist ratio.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus