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Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors.

Van Bogaert P, van Heusden D, Timmermans O, Franck E - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses' ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care.The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses' perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care.The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Research and Innovation in Care, Nursing and Midwifery Sciences, University of Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium ; Nursing, Antwerp University Hospital Antwerp, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse-physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption.

Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging.

Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium.

Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses' ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses' work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care.

Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses' perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services.

No MeSH data available.


Tested model.
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Figure 1: Tested model.

Mentions: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between nurse practice environment variables and the outcome variables job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care, using structural equation modeling. The relationships were tested with nurse work characteristics as mediating predictors and work engagement as mediating outcome variables (see Figure 1). In the tested model we hypothesized that vigor has an impact on both outcome variables (e.g., job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care) through dedication and absorption (Van Bogaert et al., 2013c). As seen in our previous tested model (Van Bogaert et al., 2013c) hospital management has an impact on vigor through workload. We expect high scores on vigor if hospital management supports nurses to control their work demands; otherwise we expect lower scores when nurses experience difficulties to balance their work demands. When nurse management at the unit level, supported by physicians and hospital management, sufficiently involves nurses in (clinically as well as organizationally) decision-making processes (decision latitude) and supports team cohesion and collaboration (social capital), scores on dedication and vigor will be more favorable. Moreover, nurses who are engaged through high score of vigor and dedication will be more focused (absorption) with their daily tasks (Van Bogaert et al., 2013c). Nurse management at the unit level has also direct impact on nurse-assessed quality of care (Van Bogaert et al., 2010, 2013c, 2014).


Nurse work engagement impacts job outcome and nurse-assessed quality of care: model testing with nurse practice environment and nurse work characteristics as predictors.

Van Bogaert P, van Heusden D, Timmermans O, Franck E - Front Psychol (2014)

Tested model.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230203&req=5

Figure 1: Tested model.
Mentions: The aim of this study was to investigate the relationships between nurse practice environment variables and the outcome variables job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care, using structural equation modeling. The relationships were tested with nurse work characteristics as mediating predictors and work engagement as mediating outcome variables (see Figure 1). In the tested model we hypothesized that vigor has an impact on both outcome variables (e.g., job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care) through dedication and absorption (Van Bogaert et al., 2013c). As seen in our previous tested model (Van Bogaert et al., 2013c) hospital management has an impact on vigor through workload. We expect high scores on vigor if hospital management supports nurses to control their work demands; otherwise we expect lower scores when nurses experience difficulties to balance their work demands. When nurse management at the unit level, supported by physicians and hospital management, sufficiently involves nurses in (clinically as well as organizationally) decision-making processes (decision latitude) and supports team cohesion and collaboration (social capital), scores on dedication and vigor will be more favorable. Moreover, nurses who are engaged through high score of vigor and dedication will be more focused (absorption) with their daily tasks (Van Bogaert et al., 2013c). Nurse management at the unit level has also direct impact on nurse-assessed quality of care (Van Bogaert et al., 2010, 2013c, 2014).

Bottom Line: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses' ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care.The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses' perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care.The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Research and Innovation in Care, Nursing and Midwifery Sciences, University of Antwerp Antwerp, Belgium ; Nursing, Antwerp University Hospital Antwerp, Belgium.

ABSTRACT

Aim: To explore the mechanisms through which nurse practice environment dimensions, such as nurse-physician relationship, nurse management at the unit level and hospital management and organizational support, are associated with job outcomes and nurse-assessed quality of care. Mediating variables included nurse work characteristics of workload, social capital, decision latitude, as well as work engagement dimensions of vigor, dedication and absorption.

Background: Understanding how to support and guide nurse practice communities in their daily effort to answer complex care most accurate, alongside with the demand of a stable and healthy nurse workforce, is challenging.

Design: Cross-sectional survey.

Method: Based on earlier empirical findings, a structural equation model, designed with valid measurement instruments, was tested. The study population included registered acute care hospital nurses (N = 1201) in eight hospitals across Belgium.

Results: Nurse practice environment dimensions predicted nurses' ratings of job outcome variables as well as quality of care. Features of nurses' work characteristics, e.g., perceived workload, decision latitude, social capital, and the three dimension of work engagement, played mediating roles between nurse practice environment and outcomes. A revised model, using various fit measures, explained 60% of job outcomes and 47% of nurse-assessed quality of care.

Conclusion: The findings in this study show that nurse work characteristics as workload, decision latitude, and social capital, alongside with nurse work engagement (e.g., vigor, dedication, and absorption) influence nurses' perspective of their nurse practice environment, job outcomes, and quality of care. The results underline aspects to considerate for various stakeholders, such as executives, nurse managers, physicians, and staff nurses, in setting up and organizing health care services.

No MeSH data available.