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Peer navigation in African American breast cancer survivors.

Mollica MA, Nemeth LS, Newman SD, Mueller M, Sterba K - Patient Relat Outcome Meas (2014)

Bottom Line: Results indicate that the PN intervention was acceptable by both PN and BCS, and was feasible in outcomes of recruitment, cost, and time requirements.Improvements in symptom distress, perceived support from God, and preparedness for recovery outcomes were observed over time.With further testing, this PN intervention may aid in decreasing general symptom distress and increase readiness for recovery post-treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and acceptability of a peer navigation survivorship program for African American (AA) breast cancer survivors (BCS) and its potential effects on selected short-term outcomes according to the Quality of Life Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.

Methods: An AA BCS who completed treatment over 1 year prior to the study was trained as a peer navigator (PN), and then paired with AA women completing primary breast cancer treatment (n=4) for 2 months. This mixed-methods, proof of concept study utilized a convergent parallel approach to explore feasibility and investigate whether changes in scores are favorable using interviews and self-administered questionnaires.

Results: Results indicate that the PN intervention was acceptable by both PN and BCS, and was feasible in outcomes of recruitment, cost, and time requirements. Improvements in symptom distress, perceived support from God, and preparedness for recovery outcomes were observed over time. Qualitative analysis revealed six themes emerging from BCS interviews: "learning to ask the right questions", "start living life again", "shifting my perspective", "wanting to give back", "home visits are powerful", and "we both have a journey": support from someone who has been there.

Conclusion: Results support current literature indicating that AA women who have survived breast cancer can be an important source of support, knowledge, and motivation for those completing breast cancer treatment. Areas for future research include standardization of training and larger randomized trials of PN intervention.

Implications for cancer survivors: The transition from breast cancer patient to survivor is a period when there can be a loss of safety net concurrent with persistent support needs. AA cancer survivors can benefit from culturally tailored support and services after treatment for breast cancer. With further testing, this PN intervention may aid in decreasing general symptom distress and increase readiness for recovery post-treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Outcomes assessed according to QOL Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.Abbreviation: QOL, quality of life.
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f1-prom-5-131: Outcomes assessed according to QOL Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.Abbreviation: QOL, quality of life.

Mentions: This 2-month intervention paired a trained AA BCS with AA women completing primary treatment for breast cancer. Month 1 of the program consisted of weekly PN visits at the home of the BCS. Each week, the PN performed health teaching in one of the four domains of the QOL Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.21 Ferrell et al21 created and validated the model through studies of bone marrow transplant survivors and BCSs. This model delineates four domains, including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being. To truly address QOL in AA BCSs, one must consider all domains in concert. Utilizing the QOL model in the current intervention, all four domains are represented in both topics of each PN-BCS session; study-outcome measurements were in each domain, and were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Figure 1 depicts study outcomes in each of the domains of the QOL Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.


Peer navigation in African American breast cancer survivors.

Mollica MA, Nemeth LS, Newman SD, Mueller M, Sterba K - Patient Relat Outcome Meas (2014)

Outcomes assessed according to QOL Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.Abbreviation: QOL, quality of life.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230185&req=5

f1-prom-5-131: Outcomes assessed according to QOL Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.Abbreviation: QOL, quality of life.
Mentions: This 2-month intervention paired a trained AA BCS with AA women completing primary treatment for breast cancer. Month 1 of the program consisted of weekly PN visits at the home of the BCS. Each week, the PN performed health teaching in one of the four domains of the QOL Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.21 Ferrell et al21 created and validated the model through studies of bone marrow transplant survivors and BCSs. This model delineates four domains, including physical, psychological, social, and spiritual well-being. To truly address QOL in AA BCSs, one must consider all domains in concert. Utilizing the QOL model in the current intervention, all four domains are represented in both topics of each PN-BCS session; study-outcome measurements were in each domain, and were assessed at baseline and post-intervention. Figure 1 depicts study outcomes in each of the domains of the QOL Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.

Bottom Line: Results indicate that the PN intervention was acceptable by both PN and BCS, and was feasible in outcomes of recruitment, cost, and time requirements.Improvements in symptom distress, perceived support from God, and preparedness for recovery outcomes were observed over time.With further testing, this PN intervention may aid in decreasing general symptom distress and increase readiness for recovery post-treatment.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Nursing, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC, USA.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore the feasibility and acceptability of a peer navigation survivorship program for African American (AA) breast cancer survivors (BCS) and its potential effects on selected short-term outcomes according to the Quality of Life Model Applied to Cancer Survivors.

Methods: An AA BCS who completed treatment over 1 year prior to the study was trained as a peer navigator (PN), and then paired with AA women completing primary breast cancer treatment (n=4) for 2 months. This mixed-methods, proof of concept study utilized a convergent parallel approach to explore feasibility and investigate whether changes in scores are favorable using interviews and self-administered questionnaires.

Results: Results indicate that the PN intervention was acceptable by both PN and BCS, and was feasible in outcomes of recruitment, cost, and time requirements. Improvements in symptom distress, perceived support from God, and preparedness for recovery outcomes were observed over time. Qualitative analysis revealed six themes emerging from BCS interviews: "learning to ask the right questions", "start living life again", "shifting my perspective", "wanting to give back", "home visits are powerful", and "we both have a journey": support from someone who has been there.

Conclusion: Results support current literature indicating that AA women who have survived breast cancer can be an important source of support, knowledge, and motivation for those completing breast cancer treatment. Areas for future research include standardization of training and larger randomized trials of PN intervention.

Implications for cancer survivors: The transition from breast cancer patient to survivor is a period when there can be a loss of safety net concurrent with persistent support needs. AA cancer survivors can benefit from culturally tailored support and services after treatment for breast cancer. With further testing, this PN intervention may aid in decreasing general symptom distress and increase readiness for recovery post-treatment.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus