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The role of syllables in sign language production.

Baus C, Gutiérrez E, Carreiras M - Front Psychol (2014)

Bottom Line: While no effect was observed for the phonological combination Handshape-Location, the combination Handshape-Movement slowed down signing latencies, but only in the non-native group.A facilitatory effect was observed for both groups when pictures and distractors shared Location-Movement.Thus, our results support the functional role of syllable units during phonological articulation in sign language production.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Université d'Aix-Marseille Marseille, France.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional role of syllables in sign language and how the different phonological combinations influence sign production. Moreover, the influence of age of acquisition was evaluated. Deaf signers (native and non-native) of Catalan Signed Language (LSC) were asked in a picture-sign interference task to sign picture names while ignoring distractor-signs with which they shared two phonological parameters (out of three of the main sign parameters: Location, Movement, and Handshape). The results revealed a different impact of the three phonological combinations. While no effect was observed for the phonological combination Handshape-Location, the combination Handshape-Movement slowed down signing latencies, but only in the non-native group. A facilitatory effect was observed for both groups when pictures and distractors shared Location-Movement. Importantly, linguistic models have considered this phonological combination to be a privileged unit in the composition of signs, as syllables are in spoken languages. Thus, our results support the functional role of syllable units during phonological articulation in sign language production.

No MeSH data available.


An example of the stimuli employed in the experiment. The sign corresponding to the picture CAR is formed by the A- Handshape, located in the neutral space and with a movement that resembles the action of moving the steering wheel. This sign shares the Location (LOC) and the Handshape (HS) with the sign TO WORK (left image) and does not share any of these parameters with the sign RETIREMENT (right image).
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Figure 1: An example of the stimuli employed in the experiment. The sign corresponding to the picture CAR is formed by the A- Handshape, located in the neutral space and with a movement that resembles the action of moving the steering wheel. This sign shares the Location (LOC) and the Handshape (HS) with the sign TO WORK (left image) and does not share any of these parameters with the sign RETIREMENT (right image).

Mentions: During the experiment, participants saw each picture twice, once in a phonologically related pair and once in an unrelated pair. The order of appearance was randomized. The results were then based on the comparison between the related and the unrelated conditions, where the same picture was used (see Figure 1 for an example and the Appendix for the full list of materials in the Supplementary Material) and not on the comparison between the different phonological combinations. The pictures appeared superimposed on a video of a deaf person signing and were presented to participants at the same time (SOA 0).


The role of syllables in sign language production.

Baus C, Gutiérrez E, Carreiras M - Front Psychol (2014)

An example of the stimuli employed in the experiment. The sign corresponding to the picture CAR is formed by the A- Handshape, located in the neutral space and with a movement that resembles the action of moving the steering wheel. This sign shares the Location (LOC) and the Handshape (HS) with the sign TO WORK (left image) and does not share any of these parameters with the sign RETIREMENT (right image).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4230165&req=5

Figure 1: An example of the stimuli employed in the experiment. The sign corresponding to the picture CAR is formed by the A- Handshape, located in the neutral space and with a movement that resembles the action of moving the steering wheel. This sign shares the Location (LOC) and the Handshape (HS) with the sign TO WORK (left image) and does not share any of these parameters with the sign RETIREMENT (right image).
Mentions: During the experiment, participants saw each picture twice, once in a phonologically related pair and once in an unrelated pair. The order of appearance was randomized. The results were then based on the comparison between the related and the unrelated conditions, where the same picture was used (see Figure 1 for an example and the Appendix for the full list of materials in the Supplementary Material) and not on the comparison between the different phonological combinations. The pictures appeared superimposed on a video of a deaf person signing and were presented to participants at the same time (SOA 0).

Bottom Line: While no effect was observed for the phonological combination Handshape-Location, the combination Handshape-Movement slowed down signing latencies, but only in the non-native group.A facilitatory effect was observed for both groups when pictures and distractors shared Location-Movement.Thus, our results support the functional role of syllable units during phonological articulation in sign language production.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Laboratoire de Psychologie Cognitive, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), Université d'Aix-Marseille Marseille, France.

ABSTRACT
The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional role of syllables in sign language and how the different phonological combinations influence sign production. Moreover, the influence of age of acquisition was evaluated. Deaf signers (native and non-native) of Catalan Signed Language (LSC) were asked in a picture-sign interference task to sign picture names while ignoring distractor-signs with which they shared two phonological parameters (out of three of the main sign parameters: Location, Movement, and Handshape). The results revealed a different impact of the three phonological combinations. While no effect was observed for the phonological combination Handshape-Location, the combination Handshape-Movement slowed down signing latencies, but only in the non-native group. A facilitatory effect was observed for both groups when pictures and distractors shared Location-Movement. Importantly, linguistic models have considered this phonological combination to be a privileged unit in the composition of signs, as syllables are in spoken languages. Thus, our results support the functional role of syllable units during phonological articulation in sign language production.

No MeSH data available.