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Quasi-linear vacancy dynamics modeling and circuit analysis of the bipolar memristor.

Abraham I - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: The model is shown to comply with Chua's generalized equations for the memristor.Independent experimental results are used throughout, to validate the insights obtained from the model.The paper concludes by implementing a memristor-capacitor filter and compares its performance to a reference resistor-capacitor filter to demonstrate that the model is usable for practical circuit analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cloud Platform Group, Intel Corporation, Dupont, Washington, United States of America; and Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The quasi-linear transport equation is investigated for modeling the bipolar memory resistor. The solution accommodates vacancy and circuit level perspectives on memristance. For the first time in literature the component resistors that constitute the contemporary dual variable resistor circuit model are quantified using vacancy parameters and derived from a governing partial differential equation. The model describes known memristor dynamics even as it generates new insight about vacancy migration, bottlenecks to switching speed and elucidates subtle relationships between switching resistance range and device parameters. The model is shown to comply with Chua's generalized equations for the memristor. Independent experimental results are used throughout, to validate the insights obtained from the model. The paper concludes by implementing a memristor-capacitor filter and compares its performance to a reference resistor-capacitor filter to demonstrate that the model is usable for practical circuit analysis.

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Current-voltage curves.A collection of I–V curves generated using (8) where the device was initialized into the low-resistance state. (a) A reference curve with zero common mode. (b) At the natural frequency the I–V curve becomes a straight line like a simple resistor. (c) With a large amplitude, the lobes take on odd shapes. (d) The lobes are offset and asymmetric when the programming voltage has a common-mode offset. The curve is clearly seen to transition from low to high resistance.
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pone-0111607-g007: Current-voltage curves.A collection of I–V curves generated using (8) where the device was initialized into the low-resistance state. (a) A reference curve with zero common mode. (b) At the natural frequency the I–V curve becomes a straight line like a simple resistor. (c) With a large amplitude, the lobes take on odd shapes. (d) The lobes are offset and asymmetric when the programming voltage has a common-mode offset. The curve is clearly seen to transition from low to high resistance.

Mentions: Fig. 7 shows a variety of I–V curves produced using (8) and varying the common mode (), amplitude () and frequency (ff  =  f0 fm) of the stimulus. The natural frequency of the device was about 5 Hz. Fig. 7(a) shows symmetric lobes and may be considered as a reference for the discussion. Fig. 7(b) shows the impact of increasing the frequency to approximately the natural frequency of the device, whereby the I–V curve became a straight line akin to a traditional resistor. In Fig. 7(c), the amplitude of excitation was increased while keeping the frequency at one-hundredth the natural frequency resulting in deformation of the lobes compared to Fig. 7(a) and also a higher resistance for the same applied voltage. For example, the lower trace of the lobe in quadrant 1 of Fig. 7(a) shows about 3.5 mA at 0.5 V (equivalent to 143Ω), whereas Fig. 7(c) presents about 2 mA at 0.5 V (equivalent to 250Ω). Fig. 7(d) shows multiple sweeps progressively accumulating higher resistance.


Quasi-linear vacancy dynamics modeling and circuit analysis of the bipolar memristor.

Abraham I - PLoS ONE (2014)

Current-voltage curves.A collection of I–V curves generated using (8) where the device was initialized into the low-resistance state. (a) A reference curve with zero common mode. (b) At the natural frequency the I–V curve becomes a straight line like a simple resistor. (c) With a large amplitude, the lobes take on odd shapes. (d) The lobes are offset and asymmetric when the programming voltage has a common-mode offset. The curve is clearly seen to transition from low to high resistance.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4229088&req=5

pone-0111607-g007: Current-voltage curves.A collection of I–V curves generated using (8) where the device was initialized into the low-resistance state. (a) A reference curve with zero common mode. (b) At the natural frequency the I–V curve becomes a straight line like a simple resistor. (c) With a large amplitude, the lobes take on odd shapes. (d) The lobes are offset and asymmetric when the programming voltage has a common-mode offset. The curve is clearly seen to transition from low to high resistance.
Mentions: Fig. 7 shows a variety of I–V curves produced using (8) and varying the common mode (), amplitude () and frequency (ff  =  f0 fm) of the stimulus. The natural frequency of the device was about 5 Hz. Fig. 7(a) shows symmetric lobes and may be considered as a reference for the discussion. Fig. 7(b) shows the impact of increasing the frequency to approximately the natural frequency of the device, whereby the I–V curve became a straight line akin to a traditional resistor. In Fig. 7(c), the amplitude of excitation was increased while keeping the frequency at one-hundredth the natural frequency resulting in deformation of the lobes compared to Fig. 7(a) and also a higher resistance for the same applied voltage. For example, the lower trace of the lobe in quadrant 1 of Fig. 7(a) shows about 3.5 mA at 0.5 V (equivalent to 143Ω), whereas Fig. 7(c) presents about 2 mA at 0.5 V (equivalent to 250Ω). Fig. 7(d) shows multiple sweeps progressively accumulating higher resistance.

Bottom Line: The model is shown to comply with Chua's generalized equations for the memristor.Independent experimental results are used throughout, to validate the insights obtained from the model.The paper concludes by implementing a memristor-capacitor filter and compares its performance to a reference resistor-capacitor filter to demonstrate that the model is usable for practical circuit analysis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cloud Platform Group, Intel Corporation, Dupont, Washington, United States of America; and Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.

ABSTRACT
The quasi-linear transport equation is investigated for modeling the bipolar memory resistor. The solution accommodates vacancy and circuit level perspectives on memristance. For the first time in literature the component resistors that constitute the contemporary dual variable resistor circuit model are quantified using vacancy parameters and derived from a governing partial differential equation. The model describes known memristor dynamics even as it generates new insight about vacancy migration, bottlenecks to switching speed and elucidates subtle relationships between switching resistance range and device parameters. The model is shown to comply with Chua's generalized equations for the memristor. Independent experimental results are used throughout, to validate the insights obtained from the model. The paper concludes by implementing a memristor-capacitor filter and compares its performance to a reference resistor-capacitor filter to demonstrate that the model is usable for practical circuit analysis.

Show MeSH