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Effects of sterilization treatments on bulk and surface properties of nanocomposite biomaterials.

Ahmed M, Punshon G, Darbyshire A, Seifalian AM - J. Biomed. Mater. Res. Part B Appl. Biomater. (2013)

Bottom Line: Although EtOH did not affect the material properties in any form, the samples were found to be nonsterile with microbial growth detected on each of the samples.Autoclaving was found to be the optimal sterilization technique for both solid and porous membranes of the nondegradable POSS-PCU samples as it was successful in sterilizing the samples, displayed no cytotoxic side effects and did not degrade the material.However, the biodegradable POSS-PCL was not able to withstand the harsh environment during autoclaving, resulting in it losing all structural integrity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Nanotechnology, Biomaterials & Tissue Engineering, Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK; Centre of Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX)), London, UK.

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Reaction mechanism for the formation of quinone chromophore responsible for yellowing the POSS-PCU samples.
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fig06: Reaction mechanism for the formation of quinone chromophore responsible for yellowing the POSS-PCU samples.

Mentions: Gamma irradiation was found to have an impact on both material appearance and properties. Although there were no changes in the appearance of POSS-PCL samples, POSS-PCU had discolored and became yellow. The difference between the two samples is, again, most likely due to the MDI in the aromatic hard segment of POSS-PCU. Exposure to gamma irradiation may have oxidised the central methylene group of the biphenyl leading to a highly conjugated quinone chromophore (Figure 6).


Effects of sterilization treatments on bulk and surface properties of nanocomposite biomaterials.

Ahmed M, Punshon G, Darbyshire A, Seifalian AM - J. Biomed. Mater. Res. Part B Appl. Biomater. (2013)

Reaction mechanism for the formation of quinone chromophore responsible for yellowing the POSS-PCU samples.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4228764&req=5

fig06: Reaction mechanism for the formation of quinone chromophore responsible for yellowing the POSS-PCU samples.
Mentions: Gamma irradiation was found to have an impact on both material appearance and properties. Although there were no changes in the appearance of POSS-PCL samples, POSS-PCU had discolored and became yellow. The difference between the two samples is, again, most likely due to the MDI in the aromatic hard segment of POSS-PCU. Exposure to gamma irradiation may have oxidised the central methylene group of the biphenyl leading to a highly conjugated quinone chromophore (Figure 6).

Bottom Line: Although EtOH did not affect the material properties in any form, the samples were found to be nonsterile with microbial growth detected on each of the samples.Autoclaving was found to be the optimal sterilization technique for both solid and porous membranes of the nondegradable POSS-PCU samples as it was successful in sterilizing the samples, displayed no cytotoxic side effects and did not degrade the material.However, the biodegradable POSS-PCL was not able to withstand the harsh environment during autoclaving, resulting in it losing all structural integrity.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Centre for Nanotechnology, Biomaterials & Tissue Engineering, Division of Surgery & Interventional Science, University College London, London, UK; Centre of Mathematics and Physics in the Life Sciences and Experimental Biology (CoMPLEX)), London, UK.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus