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Inbreeding alters intersexual fitness correlations in Drosophila simulans.

Duffy E, Joag R, Radwan J, Wedell N, Hosken DJ - Ecol Evol (2014)

Bottom Line: Intralocus sexual conflict results from sexually antagonistic selection on traits shared by the sexes.We measured male and female fitness at different times following the establishment of isofemale lines and found that the sign of the association between the two measures varied with time after initial inbreeding.Our results are consistent with suggestions that the type of genetic variation segregating within a population can determine the extent of intralocus sexual conflict and also support the idea that sexually antagonistic alleles segregate for longer in populations than alleles with sexually concordant effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Environmental Science, Jagiellonian University Gronostawa 7, Krakow, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Intralocus sexual conflict results from sexually antagonistic selection on traits shared by the sexes. This can displace males and females from their respective fitness optima, and negative intersexual correlations (r mf) for fitness are the unequivocal indicator of this evolutionary conflict. It has recently been suggested that intersexual fitness correlations can vary depending on the segregating genetic variation present in a population, and one way to alter genetic variation and test this idea is via inbreeding. Here, we test whether intersexual correlations for fitness vary with inbreeding in Drosophila simulans isolines reared under homogenous conditions. We measured male and female fitness at different times following the establishment of isofemale lines and found that the sign of the association between the two measures varied with time after initial inbreeding. Our results are consistent with suggestions that the type of genetic variation segregating within a population can determine the extent of intralocus sexual conflict and also support the idea that sexually antagonistic alleles segregate for longer in populations than alleles with sexually concordant effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

The sex (male–female) × isoline (genotype) interaction plots at the three levels of inbreeding: (A) after 5 generations of inbreeding (Short duration of inbreeding), (B) 9 generations of inbreeding (medium duration of inbreeding), and (C) 13 generations of inbreeding (long duration of inbreeding). Lines in plots represent standardized means of male (competitive success) and female (reproductive success) fitness for individual isolines (n = 33) where colors represent individual isolines.
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fig02: The sex (male–female) × isoline (genotype) interaction plots at the three levels of inbreeding: (A) after 5 generations of inbreeding (Short duration of inbreeding), (B) 9 generations of inbreeding (medium duration of inbreeding), and (C) 13 generations of inbreeding (long duration of inbreeding). Lines in plots represent standardized means of male (competitive success) and female (reproductive success) fitness for individual isolines (n = 33) where colors represent individual isolines.

Mentions: In order to examine the sources of total intersexual variation in fitness, we fitted a three-way mixed-effect model, which indicated a highly significant sex-by-isoline by inbreeding stage interaction (likelihood ratio test, χ22 = 23.173, P < 0.001). To get an insight into the nature of this three-way interaction, we ran two-way mixed-effect ANOVAs independently for each inbreeding duration. Terms were tested for significance as described above (sex: fixed effect, isoline: random effect). After the shortest duration of inbreeding, the sex-by-isoline interaction was nonsignificant (F32, 594 = 1.3383, P = 0.081), but there was a significant effect of isoline (F32, 594 = 2.39, P = 0.008). However, after the medium and long durations of inbreeding, the isoline-by-sex interactions were highly significant (medium duration: F32, 594 = 1.814, P = 0.005; long duration: F32, 594 = 2.601, P < 0.0001 Fig.2.), while the main effect of isoline at these stages of inbreeding was nonsignificant (medium stage: F32, 594 = 0.573, P = 0.940; long stage: F32, 594 = 0.791, P = 0.744). See Table S1 for effect sizes.


Inbreeding alters intersexual fitness correlations in Drosophila simulans.

Duffy E, Joag R, Radwan J, Wedell N, Hosken DJ - Ecol Evol (2014)

The sex (male–female) × isoline (genotype) interaction plots at the three levels of inbreeding: (A) after 5 generations of inbreeding (Short duration of inbreeding), (B) 9 generations of inbreeding (medium duration of inbreeding), and (C) 13 generations of inbreeding (long duration of inbreeding). Lines in plots represent standardized means of male (competitive success) and female (reproductive success) fitness for individual isolines (n = 33) where colors represent individual isolines.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4228608&req=5

fig02: The sex (male–female) × isoline (genotype) interaction plots at the three levels of inbreeding: (A) after 5 generations of inbreeding (Short duration of inbreeding), (B) 9 generations of inbreeding (medium duration of inbreeding), and (C) 13 generations of inbreeding (long duration of inbreeding). Lines in plots represent standardized means of male (competitive success) and female (reproductive success) fitness for individual isolines (n = 33) where colors represent individual isolines.
Mentions: In order to examine the sources of total intersexual variation in fitness, we fitted a three-way mixed-effect model, which indicated a highly significant sex-by-isoline by inbreeding stage interaction (likelihood ratio test, χ22 = 23.173, P < 0.001). To get an insight into the nature of this three-way interaction, we ran two-way mixed-effect ANOVAs independently for each inbreeding duration. Terms were tested for significance as described above (sex: fixed effect, isoline: random effect). After the shortest duration of inbreeding, the sex-by-isoline interaction was nonsignificant (F32, 594 = 1.3383, P = 0.081), but there was a significant effect of isoline (F32, 594 = 2.39, P = 0.008). However, after the medium and long durations of inbreeding, the isoline-by-sex interactions were highly significant (medium duration: F32, 594 = 1.814, P = 0.005; long duration: F32, 594 = 2.601, P < 0.0001 Fig.2.), while the main effect of isoline at these stages of inbreeding was nonsignificant (medium stage: F32, 594 = 0.573, P = 0.940; long stage: F32, 594 = 0.791, P = 0.744). See Table S1 for effect sizes.

Bottom Line: Intralocus sexual conflict results from sexually antagonistic selection on traits shared by the sexes.We measured male and female fitness at different times following the establishment of isofemale lines and found that the sign of the association between the two measures varied with time after initial inbreeding.Our results are consistent with suggestions that the type of genetic variation segregating within a population can determine the extent of intralocus sexual conflict and also support the idea that sexually antagonistic alleles segregate for longer in populations than alleles with sexually concordant effects.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Environmental Science, Jagiellonian University Gronostawa 7, Krakow, Poland.

ABSTRACT
Intralocus sexual conflict results from sexually antagonistic selection on traits shared by the sexes. This can displace males and females from their respective fitness optima, and negative intersexual correlations (r mf) for fitness are the unequivocal indicator of this evolutionary conflict. It has recently been suggested that intersexual fitness correlations can vary depending on the segregating genetic variation present in a population, and one way to alter genetic variation and test this idea is via inbreeding. Here, we test whether intersexual correlations for fitness vary with inbreeding in Drosophila simulans isolines reared under homogenous conditions. We measured male and female fitness at different times following the establishment of isofemale lines and found that the sign of the association between the two measures varied with time after initial inbreeding. Our results are consistent with suggestions that the type of genetic variation segregating within a population can determine the extent of intralocus sexual conflict and also support the idea that sexually antagonistic alleles segregate for longer in populations than alleles with sexually concordant effects.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus