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Risk and culture: variations in dioxin risk perceptions, behavioral preferences among social groups in South Korea.

Park S, Kim JG - Environ Health Toxicol (2014)

Bottom Line: The results show variations among groups in values, awareness and behavioral preferences.First, awareness is associated with one's geographical setting.Third, values are significantly related to WTA behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea ; Department of Environmental Studies, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF), Syracuse, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study examined variations in the perceptions of dioxin risk among social groups defined by geographical living location, environmental education, and occupation. Dioxin risk perceptions were analyzed according to values, risk awareness, knowledge, and behavioral preferences.

Methods: A quasi-experimental survey was designed and conducted on individuals from seven experimental groups in Jeonju city, South Korea, including: people living near incineration facilities; people living far from incineration facilities; governmental experts; nongovernmental organization members; office workers in developmental institutes or banks; students who were enrolled in environmental-related classes; and students who were enrolled in business-related classes.

Results: The results show variations among groups in values, awareness and behavioral preferences. Particular attention should be given to the result that groups with higher connectedness- to-nature values show higher willingness-to-act (WTA) for risk reduction. Result s can be summarized as follows. First, awareness is associated with one's geographical setting. Second, values and WTA behaviors are related to one's environmental-related education and occupation. Third, values are significantly related to WTA behaviors.

Conclusions: Different cultures, in terms of values or worldview, among groups influence their perceptions of dioxin risk and choices of risk reduction behaviors. It is important to consider values in communicating complicated long-term risk management involving public participation. Further research should be continuously conducted on the effects of multiple dimensions of values on one's WTA for risk reduction behaviors.

No MeSH data available.


Variations in awareness, knowledge, and willingness-to-act (WTA) levels. SE, students in environmental classes; SB, students in business classes; PF, people living far from incineration facilities; PN, people living near incineration facilities; GE, governmental experts; NGO, non-governmental organization; OW, business-related office worker.
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f2-eht-29-e2014013: Variations in awareness, knowledge, and willingness-to-act (WTA) levels. SE, students in environmental classes; SB, students in business classes; PF, people living far from incineration facilities; PN, people living near incineration facilities; GE, governmental experts; NGO, non-governmental organization; OW, business-related office worker.

Mentions: The ANOVA results show the pattern of variations among groups in awareness, knowledge, and WTA (Figure 2). The curves show moderate differences among groups in awareness and WTA (p<0.01), but no difference in knowledge level (p> 0.01). In percentage distributions the figure implies that PN shows greater awareness of the risk than PF, nevertheless, both groups show equal levels of WTA. The pattern of variations in awareness and WTA are inconsistent. Although knowledge variation is not significant, it is interesting to look at the pattern of the curves. The groups of SE, GE, and NGO show a slightly higher knowledge level than their counterparts. This result implies that the two factors of environmental education and occupation relation affect one’s level of knowledge, while the geographic factor does not play a significant role in predicting one’s knowledge level.


Risk and culture: variations in dioxin risk perceptions, behavioral preferences among social groups in South Korea.

Park S, Kim JG - Environ Health Toxicol (2014)

Variations in awareness, knowledge, and willingness-to-act (WTA) levels. SE, students in environmental classes; SB, students in business classes; PF, people living far from incineration facilities; PN, people living near incineration facilities; GE, governmental experts; NGO, non-governmental organization; OW, business-related office worker.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4228515&req=5

f2-eht-29-e2014013: Variations in awareness, knowledge, and willingness-to-act (WTA) levels. SE, students in environmental classes; SB, students in business classes; PF, people living far from incineration facilities; PN, people living near incineration facilities; GE, governmental experts; NGO, non-governmental organization; OW, business-related office worker.
Mentions: The ANOVA results show the pattern of variations among groups in awareness, knowledge, and WTA (Figure 2). The curves show moderate differences among groups in awareness and WTA (p<0.01), but no difference in knowledge level (p> 0.01). In percentage distributions the figure implies that PN shows greater awareness of the risk than PF, nevertheless, both groups show equal levels of WTA. The pattern of variations in awareness and WTA are inconsistent. Although knowledge variation is not significant, it is interesting to look at the pattern of the curves. The groups of SE, GE, and NGO show a slightly higher knowledge level than their counterparts. This result implies that the two factors of environmental education and occupation relation affect one’s level of knowledge, while the geographic factor does not play a significant role in predicting one’s knowledge level.

Bottom Line: The results show variations among groups in values, awareness and behavioral preferences.First, awareness is associated with one's geographical setting.Third, values are significantly related to WTA behaviors.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Environmental Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Korea ; Department of Environmental Studies, State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry (SUNY-ESF), Syracuse, NY, USA.

ABSTRACT

Objectives: This study examined variations in the perceptions of dioxin risk among social groups defined by geographical living location, environmental education, and occupation. Dioxin risk perceptions were analyzed according to values, risk awareness, knowledge, and behavioral preferences.

Methods: A quasi-experimental survey was designed and conducted on individuals from seven experimental groups in Jeonju city, South Korea, including: people living near incineration facilities; people living far from incineration facilities; governmental experts; nongovernmental organization members; office workers in developmental institutes or banks; students who were enrolled in environmental-related classes; and students who were enrolled in business-related classes.

Results: The results show variations among groups in values, awareness and behavioral preferences. Particular attention should be given to the result that groups with higher connectedness- to-nature values show higher willingness-to-act (WTA) for risk reduction. Result s can be summarized as follows. First, awareness is associated with one's geographical setting. Second, values and WTA behaviors are related to one's environmental-related education and occupation. Third, values are significantly related to WTA behaviors.

Conclusions: Different cultures, in terms of values or worldview, among groups influence their perceptions of dioxin risk and choices of risk reduction behaviors. It is important to consider values in communicating complicated long-term risk management involving public participation. Further research should be continuously conducted on the effects of multiple dimensions of values on one's WTA for risk reduction behaviors.

No MeSH data available.