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Sex differences in ventricular-vascular coupling following endurance training.

Lane AD, Yan H, Ranadive SM, Kappus RM, Sun P, Cook MD, Harvey I, Woods J, Wilund K, Fernhall B - Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. (2014)

Bottom Line: We hypothesized a reduction in the coupling ratio in both sexes due to a decrease in Ea that would be more pronounced in men and an increase in Elv that would be larger in women.Women also reduced end-systolic pressure (from 91 ± 10 to 87 ± 10 mmHg), and both groups reduced central pulse wave velocity (from 6.0 ± 1.0 to 5.6 ± 0.6 m/s, p < 0.05).We conclude that after 8 weeks of aerobic training, only women reduced their coupling ratio due to an increase in Elv.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health and Human Physiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA, abbi-lane@uiowa.edu.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Ventricular and vascular coupling is defined as the ratio of arterial elastance (Ea) to ventricular elastance (Elv) and describes the interaction between the heart and arterial system. There are sex differences in both arterial and ventricular function in response to both acute exercise and aerobic exercise training.

Purpose: To examine the effects of aerobic exercise training on elastances and the coupling ratio in young adult men and women. We hypothesized a reduction in the coupling ratio in both sexes due to a decrease in Ea that would be more pronounced in men and an increase in Elv that would be larger in women.

Methods: Fifty-three healthy, young adults completed the study. Central pulse wave velocity and heart volumes were measured before and after an 8-week aerobic training intervention. Elastances were calculated as Ea = end-systolic pressure/stroke volume and Elv = end-systolic pressure/end-systolic volume and indexed to body surface area.

Results: After the intervention, women augmented indexed and un-indexed Elv from 2.09 ± 0.61 to 2.52 ± 0.80 mmHg/ml, p < 0.05, and reduced the coupling ratio from 0.72 ± 18 to 0.62 ± 15, p < 0.05, while men maintained their pre-training ratio (from 0.66 ± 0.20 to 0.74 ± 0.21, p > 0.05). Women also reduced end-systolic pressure (from 91 ± 10 to 87 ± 10 mmHg), and both groups reduced central pulse wave velocity (from 6.0 ± 1.0 to 5.6 ± 0.6 m/s, p < 0.05).

Conclusion: We conclude that after 8 weeks of aerobic training, only women reduced their coupling ratio due to an increase in Elv. This suggests that aerobic exercise training elicits sex-dependent changes in the coupling ratio in young, healthy individuals.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

a EaI, b ElvI, and c ratio responses to exercise training in men and women. EaI arterial elastance indexed to body size; ElvI left ventricular elastance indexed to body size; EaI/ElvI the coupling ratio indexed to body size; asterisk represents a significant difference between pre- and post-training values in that sex; dagger indicates a significant time by sex interaction; and double dagger denotes a significant difference between male and female values at that time point, p < 0.05 for all. Men and women maintained EaI post-training. Female subjects increased ElvI and decreased Ea/Elv after training. EaI, ElvI, and ratio responses to exercise training in males and females
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Fig1: a EaI, b ElvI, and c ratio responses to exercise training in men and women. EaI arterial elastance indexed to body size; ElvI left ventricular elastance indexed to body size; EaI/ElvI the coupling ratio indexed to body size; asterisk represents a significant difference between pre- and post-training values in that sex; dagger indicates a significant time by sex interaction; and double dagger denotes a significant difference between male and female values at that time point, p < 0.05 for all. Men and women maintained EaI post-training. Female subjects increased ElvI and decreased Ea/Elv after training. EaI, ElvI, and ratio responses to exercise training in males and females

Mentions: At baseline and after training, women had higher EaI than men, but EaI did not change with training in either group, p > 0.05; Fig. 1a. Un-indexed values of Ea were also not altered with training (from 1.48 ± 0.7 to 1.47 ± 0.08 mmHg/ml in women and from 1.22 ± 0.06 to 1.27 ± 0.06 mmHg/ml in men, p > 0.05).Fig. 1


Sex differences in ventricular-vascular coupling following endurance training.

Lane AD, Yan H, Ranadive SM, Kappus RM, Sun P, Cook MD, Harvey I, Woods J, Wilund K, Fernhall B - Eur. J. Appl. Physiol. (2014)

a EaI, b ElvI, and c ratio responses to exercise training in men and women. EaI arterial elastance indexed to body size; ElvI left ventricular elastance indexed to body size; EaI/ElvI the coupling ratio indexed to body size; asterisk represents a significant difference between pre- and post-training values in that sex; dagger indicates a significant time by sex interaction; and double dagger denotes a significant difference between male and female values at that time point, p < 0.05 for all. Men and women maintained EaI post-training. Female subjects increased ElvI and decreased Ea/Elv after training. EaI, ElvI, and ratio responses to exercise training in males and females
© Copyright Policy - OpenAccess
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4228114&req=5

Fig1: a EaI, b ElvI, and c ratio responses to exercise training in men and women. EaI arterial elastance indexed to body size; ElvI left ventricular elastance indexed to body size; EaI/ElvI the coupling ratio indexed to body size; asterisk represents a significant difference between pre- and post-training values in that sex; dagger indicates a significant time by sex interaction; and double dagger denotes a significant difference between male and female values at that time point, p < 0.05 for all. Men and women maintained EaI post-training. Female subjects increased ElvI and decreased Ea/Elv after training. EaI, ElvI, and ratio responses to exercise training in males and females
Mentions: At baseline and after training, women had higher EaI than men, but EaI did not change with training in either group, p > 0.05; Fig. 1a. Un-indexed values of Ea were also not altered with training (from 1.48 ± 0.7 to 1.47 ± 0.08 mmHg/ml in women and from 1.22 ± 0.06 to 1.27 ± 0.06 mmHg/ml in men, p > 0.05).Fig. 1

Bottom Line: We hypothesized a reduction in the coupling ratio in both sexes due to a decrease in Ea that would be more pronounced in men and an increase in Elv that would be larger in women.Women also reduced end-systolic pressure (from 91 ± 10 to 87 ± 10 mmHg), and both groups reduced central pulse wave velocity (from 6.0 ± 1.0 to 5.6 ± 0.6 m/s, p < 0.05).We conclude that after 8 weeks of aerobic training, only women reduced their coupling ratio due to an increase in Elv.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health and Human Physiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USA, abbi-lane@uiowa.edu.

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Ventricular and vascular coupling is defined as the ratio of arterial elastance (Ea) to ventricular elastance (Elv) and describes the interaction between the heart and arterial system. There are sex differences in both arterial and ventricular function in response to both acute exercise and aerobic exercise training.

Purpose: To examine the effects of aerobic exercise training on elastances and the coupling ratio in young adult men and women. We hypothesized a reduction in the coupling ratio in both sexes due to a decrease in Ea that would be more pronounced in men and an increase in Elv that would be larger in women.

Methods: Fifty-three healthy, young adults completed the study. Central pulse wave velocity and heart volumes were measured before and after an 8-week aerobic training intervention. Elastances were calculated as Ea = end-systolic pressure/stroke volume and Elv = end-systolic pressure/end-systolic volume and indexed to body surface area.

Results: After the intervention, women augmented indexed and un-indexed Elv from 2.09 ± 0.61 to 2.52 ± 0.80 mmHg/ml, p < 0.05, and reduced the coupling ratio from 0.72 ± 18 to 0.62 ± 15, p < 0.05, while men maintained their pre-training ratio (from 0.66 ± 0.20 to 0.74 ± 0.21, p > 0.05). Women also reduced end-systolic pressure (from 91 ± 10 to 87 ± 10 mmHg), and both groups reduced central pulse wave velocity (from 6.0 ± 1.0 to 5.6 ± 0.6 m/s, p < 0.05).

Conclusion: We conclude that after 8 weeks of aerobic training, only women reduced their coupling ratio due to an increase in Elv. This suggests that aerobic exercise training elicits sex-dependent changes in the coupling ratio in young, healthy individuals.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus