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Streptococcus mitis induces conversion of Helicobacter pylori to coccoid cells during co-culture in vitro.

Khosravi Y, Dieye Y, Loke MF, Goh KL, Vadivelu J - PLoS ONE (2014)

Bottom Line: We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells.In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth.Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major gastric pathogen that has been associated with humans for more than 60,000 years. H. pylori causes different gastric diseases including dyspepsia, ulcers and gastric cancers. Disease development depends on several factors including the infecting H. pylori strain, environmental and host factors. Another factor that might influence H. pylori colonization and diseases is the gastric microbiota that was overlooked for long because of the belief that human stomach was a hostile environment that cannot support microbial life. Once established, H. pylori mainly resides in the gastric mucosa and interacts with the resident bacteria. How these interactions impact on H. pylori-caused diseases has been poorly studied in human. In this study, we analyzed the interactions between H. pylori and two bacteria, Streptococcus mitis and Lactobacillus fermentum that are present in the stomach of both healthy and gastric disease human patients. We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells. In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth. Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells. This study provide evidences that gastric bacteria influences H. pylori physiology and therefore possibly the diseases this bacterium causes.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Effect of S. mitis and of L. fermentum on H. pylori growth during co-culture.H. pylori reference (NCTC 11637, (a)) and clinical (UM032, (b)) strains were grown alone or co-cultured with S. mitis or with L. fermentum. At the times indicated, colony forming unit of H. pylori were calculated by plating dilutions of the cells onto chocolate-agar plates. Each point shows the means and standard deviation of triplicated experiments.
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pone-0112214-g002: Effect of S. mitis and of L. fermentum on H. pylori growth during co-culture.H. pylori reference (NCTC 11637, (a)) and clinical (UM032, (b)) strains were grown alone or co-cultured with S. mitis or with L. fermentum. At the times indicated, colony forming unit of H. pylori were calculated by plating dilutions of the cells onto chocolate-agar plates. Each point shows the means and standard deviation of triplicated experiments.

Mentions: H. pylori mono-cultures increased in cell density by ∼2 logs between day 1 and day 4 following inoculation and then stabilized up to day 7 (Fig. 2a). Interestingly, when co-cultured with S. mitis, cell density of H. pylori cultures dramatically dropped from day 1 and viable cells could not be detected after two days of co-culture (Fig. 2a). This phenomenon was not strain specific since both H. pylori UM032 [28], a clinical isolate and H. pylori NCTC, a laboratory strain displayed the same behaviour (Fig. 2b). In contrast to S. mitis, co-culture with L. fermentum did not affect the growth of H. pylori cells that was comparable to that of a mono-culture (Fig. 2a). These results suggest that S. mitis specifically inhibits growth of H. pylori cells in co-culture.


Streptococcus mitis induces conversion of Helicobacter pylori to coccoid cells during co-culture in vitro.

Khosravi Y, Dieye Y, Loke MF, Goh KL, Vadivelu J - PLoS ONE (2014)

Effect of S. mitis and of L. fermentum on H. pylori growth during co-culture.H. pylori reference (NCTC 11637, (a)) and clinical (UM032, (b)) strains were grown alone or co-cultured with S. mitis or with L. fermentum. At the times indicated, colony forming unit of H. pylori were calculated by plating dilutions of the cells onto chocolate-agar plates. Each point shows the means and standard deviation of triplicated experiments.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4227722&req=5

pone-0112214-g002: Effect of S. mitis and of L. fermentum on H. pylori growth during co-culture.H. pylori reference (NCTC 11637, (a)) and clinical (UM032, (b)) strains were grown alone or co-cultured with S. mitis or with L. fermentum. At the times indicated, colony forming unit of H. pylori were calculated by plating dilutions of the cells onto chocolate-agar plates. Each point shows the means and standard deviation of triplicated experiments.
Mentions: H. pylori mono-cultures increased in cell density by ∼2 logs between day 1 and day 4 following inoculation and then stabilized up to day 7 (Fig. 2a). Interestingly, when co-cultured with S. mitis, cell density of H. pylori cultures dramatically dropped from day 1 and viable cells could not be detected after two days of co-culture (Fig. 2a). This phenomenon was not strain specific since both H. pylori UM032 [28], a clinical isolate and H. pylori NCTC, a laboratory strain displayed the same behaviour (Fig. 2b). In contrast to S. mitis, co-culture with L. fermentum did not affect the growth of H. pylori cells that was comparable to that of a mono-culture (Fig. 2a). These results suggest that S. mitis specifically inhibits growth of H. pylori cells in co-culture.

Bottom Line: We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells.In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth.Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Medical Microbiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

ABSTRACT
Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is a major gastric pathogen that has been associated with humans for more than 60,000 years. H. pylori causes different gastric diseases including dyspepsia, ulcers and gastric cancers. Disease development depends on several factors including the infecting H. pylori strain, environmental and host factors. Another factor that might influence H. pylori colonization and diseases is the gastric microbiota that was overlooked for long because of the belief that human stomach was a hostile environment that cannot support microbial life. Once established, H. pylori mainly resides in the gastric mucosa and interacts with the resident bacteria. How these interactions impact on H. pylori-caused diseases has been poorly studied in human. In this study, we analyzed the interactions between H. pylori and two bacteria, Streptococcus mitis and Lactobacillus fermentum that are present in the stomach of both healthy and gastric disease human patients. We have found that S. mitis produced and released one or more diffusible factors that induce growth inhibition and coccoid conversion of H. pylori cells. In contrast, both H. pylori and L. fermentum secreted factors that promote survival of S. mitis during the stationary phase of growth. Using a metabolomics approach, we identified compounds that might be responsible for the conversion of H. pylori from spiral to coccoid cells. This study provide evidences that gastric bacteria influences H. pylori physiology and therefore possibly the diseases this bacterium causes.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus