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Microwave-assisted simultaneous extraction of luteolin and apigenin from tree peony pod and evaluation of its antioxidant activity.

Wang H, Yang L, Zu Y, Zhao X - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: The MAE procedure was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and compared with other conventional extraction techniques of macerate extraction (ME) and heat reflux extraction (HRE).Compared with ME and HRE, MAE gave the highest extraction efficiency.Meanwhile, the structural changes of the unprocessed and processed tree peony pod samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Box 332, Hexing Road 26, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150040, China ; State Engineering Laboratory for Bioresource Eco-Utilization, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China.

ABSTRACT
An efficient microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) technique was employed in simultaneous extraction of luteolin and apigenin from tree peony pod. The MAE procedure was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and compared with other conventional extraction techniques of macerate extraction (ME) and heat reflux extraction (HRE). The optimal conditions of MAE were as follows: employing 70% ethanol volume fraction as solvent, soaking time of 4 h, liquid-solid ratio of 10 (mL/g), microwave irradiation power of 265 W, microwave irradiation time of 9.6 min, and 3 extraction cycles. Under the optimal conditions, 151 μg/g luteolin and 104 μg/g apigenin were extracted from the tree peony pod. Compared with ME and HRE, MAE gave the highest extraction efficiency. The antioxidant activities of the extracts obtained by MAE, ME, and HRE were evaluated using a 2,2-di(4-tert-octylphenyl)-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging assay, a ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP), and a reducing power assay. Meanwhile, the structural changes of the unprocessed and processed tree peony pod samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

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The HPLC profiles of a mixture of standards of luteolin and apigenin (a) and the two compounds in an extract obtained by MAE using 70% ethanol as extraction solvent (b).
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fig1: The HPLC profiles of a mixture of standards of luteolin and apigenin (a) and the two compounds in an extract obtained by MAE using 70% ethanol as extraction solvent (b).

Mentions: Flavonoids are a group of benzo-γ-pyran derivatives, comprising a very large class of low molecular weight polyphenol compounds. Among the flavonoids, luteolin (3′,4′,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone) and apigenin (4′,5,7,-trihydroxyflavone) (Figure 1) are reportedly important functional components, which exhibit the pharmacological effects. For example, luteolin has been found to possess antioxidant [5], anticancer action [6], anti-inflammatory [7], antihepatotoxic action [8], antiallergic, antiosteoporotic [9], antidiabetic [10], and antiplatelet and vasodilatory activity [11]. In addition to antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory, apigenin also exhibits antihyperglycemic action [12] and antinociceptive effect [13]. Luteolin and apigenin are natural food additives used extensively in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Flavonoids constitute a large part of global nutraceuticals market [14] and the current nutraceuticals market was estimated at $151 billion in 2011 and was growing by about 6.5% per annum [15]. The pod of tree peony, after flavonoids extraction, could still be used as a high-polysaccharide stock feed in dry form, increasing the potential return for the seed oil industry and reducing the pollution load on the environment.


Microwave-assisted simultaneous extraction of luteolin and apigenin from tree peony pod and evaluation of its antioxidant activity.

Wang H, Yang L, Zu Y, Zhao X - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

The HPLC profiles of a mixture of standards of luteolin and apigenin (a) and the two compounds in an extract obtained by MAE using 70% ethanol as extraction solvent (b).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4227382&req=5

fig1: The HPLC profiles of a mixture of standards of luteolin and apigenin (a) and the two compounds in an extract obtained by MAE using 70% ethanol as extraction solvent (b).
Mentions: Flavonoids are a group of benzo-γ-pyran derivatives, comprising a very large class of low molecular weight polyphenol compounds. Among the flavonoids, luteolin (3′,4′,5,7-tetrahydroxyflavone) and apigenin (4′,5,7,-trihydroxyflavone) (Figure 1) are reportedly important functional components, which exhibit the pharmacological effects. For example, luteolin has been found to possess antioxidant [5], anticancer action [6], anti-inflammatory [7], antihepatotoxic action [8], antiallergic, antiosteoporotic [9], antidiabetic [10], and antiplatelet and vasodilatory activity [11]. In addition to antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory, apigenin also exhibits antihyperglycemic action [12] and antinociceptive effect [13]. Luteolin and apigenin are natural food additives used extensively in the food and pharmaceutical industries. Flavonoids constitute a large part of global nutraceuticals market [14] and the current nutraceuticals market was estimated at $151 billion in 2011 and was growing by about 6.5% per annum [15]. The pod of tree peony, after flavonoids extraction, could still be used as a high-polysaccharide stock feed in dry form, increasing the potential return for the seed oil industry and reducing the pollution load on the environment.

Bottom Line: The MAE procedure was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and compared with other conventional extraction techniques of macerate extraction (ME) and heat reflux extraction (HRE).Compared with ME and HRE, MAE gave the highest extraction efficiency.Meanwhile, the structural changes of the unprocessed and processed tree peony pod samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Key Laboratory of Forest Plant Ecology, Ministry of Education, Northeast Forestry University, Box 332, Hexing Road 26, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150040, China ; State Engineering Laboratory for Bioresource Eco-Utilization, Northeast Forestry University, Harbin 150040, China.

ABSTRACT
An efficient microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) technique was employed in simultaneous extraction of luteolin and apigenin from tree peony pod. The MAE procedure was optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) and compared with other conventional extraction techniques of macerate extraction (ME) and heat reflux extraction (HRE). The optimal conditions of MAE were as follows: employing 70% ethanol volume fraction as solvent, soaking time of 4 h, liquid-solid ratio of 10 (mL/g), microwave irradiation power of 265 W, microwave irradiation time of 9.6 min, and 3 extraction cycles. Under the optimal conditions, 151 μg/g luteolin and 104 μg/g apigenin were extracted from the tree peony pod. Compared with ME and HRE, MAE gave the highest extraction efficiency. The antioxidant activities of the extracts obtained by MAE, ME, and HRE were evaluated using a 2,2-di(4-tert-octylphenyl)-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free radical-scavenging assay, a ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP), and a reducing power assay. Meanwhile, the structural changes of the unprocessed and processed tree peony pod samples were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus