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Elevational patterns of plant richness in the Taibai Mountain, China.

Tang L, Li T, Li D, Meng X - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: Species richness patterns were regressed against area, middle domain effect (MDE), mean annual temperature (MAT), and mean annual precipitation (MAP).The results showed that richness of overall plants, seed plants, bryophytes, and ferns all showed hump-shaped patterns along the elevational gradient, although the absolute elevation of richness peaks differed in different plant groups.Species richness of each plant group was all associated strongly with MAT and MAP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Forestry, Northwest A & F University, Yangling 712100, China.

ABSTRACT
The elevational distribution of plant diversity is a popular issue in ecology and biogeography, and several studies have examined the determinants behind plant diversity patterns. In this study, using published data of the local flora of Taibai Mountain, we explored the effects of spatial and climatic factors on plant species richness. We also evaluated Rapoport's elevational rule by examining the relationship between elevational range size and midpoint. Species richness patterns were regressed against area, middle domain effect (MDE), mean annual temperature (MAT), and mean annual precipitation (MAP). The results showed that richness of overall plants, seed plants, bryophytes, and ferns all showed hump-shaped patterns along the elevational gradient, although the absolute elevation of richness peaks differed in different plant groups. Species richness of each plant group was all associated strongly with MAT and MAP. In addition to climatic factors, overall plants and seed plants were more related to area in linear regression models, while MDE was a powerful explanatory variable for bryophytes. Rapoport's elevational rule on species richness was not supported. Our study suggests that a combined interaction of spatial and climatic factors influences the elevational patterns of plant species richness on Taibai Mountain, China.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Relationships between elevation and mean annual temperature (MAT) (dash line) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) (solid line).
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fig3: Relationships between elevation and mean annual temperature (MAT) (dash line) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) (solid line).

Mentions: Mean annual temperature (MAT) and precipitation (MAP) were two major climatic variables as potential explanations for variations of plant species richness [31]. Due to complex terrain conditions and rare meteorological stations, it is difficult to obtain the microclimate data at different elevations in mountain regions. In order to obtain the accurate temperature information of different elevational band, the MAT data used in this study came from the field measurement of Ren et al. from 2001 July to 2002 July [61]. In the north and south slopes of Taibai Mountain, 18 miniature automatic meteorological recorders were placed at every 250 m along an elevational gradient. Then the fitting equation between elevation and MAT was established; MAT of each elevational band can be calculated based on this equation (Figure 3). The MAP data were derived from yearbooks among Zhouzhi County, Taibai County, and Mei County. According to the relationship between MAP and elevation in mountain regions on the following equation [75], we calculated MAP of each elevational band below 2000 m a.s.l. in north slope and 2300 m a.s.l. in south slope, respectively:(1)PZ=Ph0+a[(2H−Z)×Z−(2H−h0)×h0],where PZ is a certain elevation (Z) precipitation and Ph0 is a reference elevation (h0) precipitation below the maximum precipitation of height (H); a is a parameter related to regional characteristics (in south slope a = 7.778 × 10−5, in north slope a = 4.938 × 10−5). Above 2000 m a.s.l. in north slope and 2300 m a.s.l. in south slope, the MAP of each elevational band was predicted by extending the fitting line. The mean precipitation between north and south slopes of Mountain Taibai was calculated and used to analyze the impact of precipitation on species richness along the elevational gradient (Figure 3).


Elevational patterns of plant richness in the Taibai Mountain, China.

Tang L, Li T, Li D, Meng X - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Relationships between elevation and mean annual temperature (MAT) (dash line) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) (solid line).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4227370&req=5

fig3: Relationships between elevation and mean annual temperature (MAT) (dash line) and mean annual precipitation (MAP) (solid line).
Mentions: Mean annual temperature (MAT) and precipitation (MAP) were two major climatic variables as potential explanations for variations of plant species richness [31]. Due to complex terrain conditions and rare meteorological stations, it is difficult to obtain the microclimate data at different elevations in mountain regions. In order to obtain the accurate temperature information of different elevational band, the MAT data used in this study came from the field measurement of Ren et al. from 2001 July to 2002 July [61]. In the north and south slopes of Taibai Mountain, 18 miniature automatic meteorological recorders were placed at every 250 m along an elevational gradient. Then the fitting equation between elevation and MAT was established; MAT of each elevational band can be calculated based on this equation (Figure 3). The MAP data were derived from yearbooks among Zhouzhi County, Taibai County, and Mei County. According to the relationship between MAP and elevation in mountain regions on the following equation [75], we calculated MAP of each elevational band below 2000 m a.s.l. in north slope and 2300 m a.s.l. in south slope, respectively:(1)PZ=Ph0+a[(2H−Z)×Z−(2H−h0)×h0],where PZ is a certain elevation (Z) precipitation and Ph0 is a reference elevation (h0) precipitation below the maximum precipitation of height (H); a is a parameter related to regional characteristics (in south slope a = 7.778 × 10−5, in north slope a = 4.938 × 10−5). Above 2000 m a.s.l. in north slope and 2300 m a.s.l. in south slope, the MAP of each elevational band was predicted by extending the fitting line. The mean precipitation between north and south slopes of Mountain Taibai was calculated and used to analyze the impact of precipitation on species richness along the elevational gradient (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: Species richness patterns were regressed against area, middle domain effect (MDE), mean annual temperature (MAT), and mean annual precipitation (MAP).The results showed that richness of overall plants, seed plants, bryophytes, and ferns all showed hump-shaped patterns along the elevational gradient, although the absolute elevation of richness peaks differed in different plant groups.Species richness of each plant group was all associated strongly with MAT and MAP.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: College of Forestry, Northwest A & F University, Yangling 712100, China.

ABSTRACT
The elevational distribution of plant diversity is a popular issue in ecology and biogeography, and several studies have examined the determinants behind plant diversity patterns. In this study, using published data of the local flora of Taibai Mountain, we explored the effects of spatial and climatic factors on plant species richness. We also evaluated Rapoport's elevational rule by examining the relationship between elevational range size and midpoint. Species richness patterns were regressed against area, middle domain effect (MDE), mean annual temperature (MAT), and mean annual precipitation (MAP). The results showed that richness of overall plants, seed plants, bryophytes, and ferns all showed hump-shaped patterns along the elevational gradient, although the absolute elevation of richness peaks differed in different plant groups. Species richness of each plant group was all associated strongly with MAT and MAP. In addition to climatic factors, overall plants and seed plants were more related to area in linear regression models, while MDE was a powerful explanatory variable for bryophytes. Rapoport's elevational rule on species richness was not supported. Our study suggests that a combined interaction of spatial and climatic factors influences the elevational patterns of plant species richness on Taibai Mountain, China.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus