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Applications of organic and inorganic amendments induce changes in the mobility of mercury and macro- and micronutrients of soils.

García-Sánchez M, Sípková A, Száková J, Kaplan L, Ochecová P, Tlustoš P - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

Bottom Line: Both soil organic matter and sulfur (S) can reduce or even suppress mercury (Hg) mobility and bioavailability in soil.The experiment proved digestate application as the efficient measure for fast reduction of mobile Hg at extremely contaminated soils.Moreover, the decrease of the mobile mercury portion was followed by improvement of the nutrient status of the soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences, Suchdol, 16521 Prague 6, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Both soil organic matter and sulfur (S) can reduce or even suppress mercury (Hg) mobility and bioavailability in soil. A batch incubation experiment was conducted with a Chernozem and a Luvisol artificially contaminated by 440 mg · kg(-1) Hg showing wide differences in their physicochemical properties and available nutrients. The individual treatments were (i) digestate from the anaerobic fermentation of biowaste; (ii) fly ash from wood chip combustion; and (iii) ammonium sulfate, and every treatment was added with the same amount of S. The mobile Hg portion in Chernozem was highly reduced by adding digestate, even after 1 day of incubation, compared to control. Meanwhile, the outcome of these treatments was a decrease of mobile Hg forms as a function of incubation time whereas the contents of magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and phosphorus (P) were stimulated by the addition of digestate in both soils. The available calcium (Ca) contents were not affected by the digestate addition. The experiment proved digestate application as the efficient measure for fast reduction of mobile Hg at extremely contaminated soils. Moreover, the decrease of the mobile mercury portion was followed by improvement of the nutrient status of the soils.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The concentrations of Hg extractable with 0.11 mol L−1 acetic acid within the incubation experiment (mg·kg−1) according to the individual treatments.
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fig1: The concentrations of Hg extractable with 0.11 mol L−1 acetic acid within the incubation experiment (mg·kg−1) according to the individual treatments.

Mentions: The mobile Hg contents affected by the individual treatments and their variability during the incubation experiment are summarized in Figure 1. In the treatments without artificial Hg application, the mobile Hg contents were under the detection limit of ICP-MS. Similarly to our previous observations [23], Ruggiero et al. [24] also documented that most of the Hg in the long-term polluted soils was scarcely mobile and available. The Hg contents in digestates and fly ash are usually low as well [25, 26] and did not affect the mobile portions of Hg in our experiment. The extractable Hg contents differed according to the physicochemical parameters of the used soils and to the individual treatments. In Chernozem, the extractable Hg contents were low regardless of the treatment at the beginning and end of incubation. Within the 3rd and 7th day of incubation, the mobile Hg portions increased in all treatments (including control) except for the digestate. Similar course of Hg mobility changes were observed by Bower et al. [27] in the experiments studying the mercury adsorption onto pyrite indicating the formation of nonmobile sulfides over time. In the Luvisol, the mobile Hg portions decreased during the incubation, whereas they dropped to the levels reached in Chernozem by the end of the experiment. As stated by Müller et al. [28] soil Hg contamination can cause reduced microbial biomass at the contaminated sites. However, some microorganisms have developed mechanisms to adapt to Hg, that is, Hg-resistant bacteria. Thus, the changes in Hg mobility observed throughout the experiment could be partially attributed to different communities of soil microorganism present in both Chernozem and Luvisol.


Applications of organic and inorganic amendments induce changes in the mobility of mercury and macro- and micronutrients of soils.

García-Sánchez M, Sípková A, Száková J, Kaplan L, Ochecová P, Tlustoš P - ScientificWorldJournal (2014)

The concentrations of Hg extractable with 0.11 mol L−1 acetic acid within the incubation experiment (mg·kg−1) according to the individual treatments.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4226182&req=5

fig1: The concentrations of Hg extractable with 0.11 mol L−1 acetic acid within the incubation experiment (mg·kg−1) according to the individual treatments.
Mentions: The mobile Hg contents affected by the individual treatments and their variability during the incubation experiment are summarized in Figure 1. In the treatments without artificial Hg application, the mobile Hg contents were under the detection limit of ICP-MS. Similarly to our previous observations [23], Ruggiero et al. [24] also documented that most of the Hg in the long-term polluted soils was scarcely mobile and available. The Hg contents in digestates and fly ash are usually low as well [25, 26] and did not affect the mobile portions of Hg in our experiment. The extractable Hg contents differed according to the physicochemical parameters of the used soils and to the individual treatments. In Chernozem, the extractable Hg contents were low regardless of the treatment at the beginning and end of incubation. Within the 3rd and 7th day of incubation, the mobile Hg portions increased in all treatments (including control) except for the digestate. Similar course of Hg mobility changes were observed by Bower et al. [27] in the experiments studying the mercury adsorption onto pyrite indicating the formation of nonmobile sulfides over time. In the Luvisol, the mobile Hg portions decreased during the incubation, whereas they dropped to the levels reached in Chernozem by the end of the experiment. As stated by Müller et al. [28] soil Hg contamination can cause reduced microbial biomass at the contaminated sites. However, some microorganisms have developed mechanisms to adapt to Hg, that is, Hg-resistant bacteria. Thus, the changes in Hg mobility observed throughout the experiment could be partially attributed to different communities of soil microorganism present in both Chernozem and Luvisol.

Bottom Line: Both soil organic matter and sulfur (S) can reduce or even suppress mercury (Hg) mobility and bioavailability in soil.The experiment proved digestate application as the efficient measure for fast reduction of mobile Hg at extremely contaminated soils.Moreover, the decrease of the mobile mercury portion was followed by improvement of the nutrient status of the soils.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Agro-Environmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Faculty of Agrobiology, Food and Natural Resources, Czech University of Life Sciences, Suchdol, 16521 Prague 6, Czech Republic.

ABSTRACT
Both soil organic matter and sulfur (S) can reduce or even suppress mercury (Hg) mobility and bioavailability in soil. A batch incubation experiment was conducted with a Chernozem and a Luvisol artificially contaminated by 440 mg · kg(-1) Hg showing wide differences in their physicochemical properties and available nutrients. The individual treatments were (i) digestate from the anaerobic fermentation of biowaste; (ii) fly ash from wood chip combustion; and (iii) ammonium sulfate, and every treatment was added with the same amount of S. The mobile Hg portion in Chernozem was highly reduced by adding digestate, even after 1 day of incubation, compared to control. Meanwhile, the outcome of these treatments was a decrease of mobile Hg forms as a function of incubation time whereas the contents of magnesium (Mg), potassium (K), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and phosphorus (P) were stimulated by the addition of digestate in both soils. The available calcium (Ca) contents were not affected by the digestate addition. The experiment proved digestate application as the efficient measure for fast reduction of mobile Hg at extremely contaminated soils. Moreover, the decrease of the mobile mercury portion was followed by improvement of the nutrient status of the soils.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus