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Association of increased serum glycated albumin levels with low coronary collateralization in type 2 diabetic patients with stable angina and chronic total occlusion.

Shen Y, Lu L, Ding FH, Sun Z, Zhang RY, Zhang Q, Yang ZK, Hu J, Chen QJ, Shen WF - Cardiovasc Diabetol (2013)

Bottom Line: In non-diabetic patients, both GA and HbA1c levels did not significantly differ regardless the status of coronary collateralization.In multivariable analysis, female gender, age > 65 years, smoke, non-hypertension, duration of diabetes > 10 years, metabolic syndrome, eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m2, and GA > 18.3% were independently determinants for low collateralization in diabetic patients.Increased GA levels in serum are associated with impaired collateral growth in type 2 diabetic patients with stable angina and chronic total occlusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, People's Republic of China. rjshenweifeng@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: We investigated whether serum glycated albumin (GA) levels are related to coronary collateralization in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic total occlusion.

Methods: Blood levels of GA and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were determined in 317 diabetic and 117 non-diabetic patients with stable angina and angiographic total occlusion of at least one major coronary artery. The degree of collaterals supplying the distal aspect of a total occlusion from the contra-lateral vessel was graded as low (Rentrop score of 0 or 1) or high collateralization (Rentrop score of 2 or 3).

Results: For diabetic patients, GA (21.2 ± 6.5% vs. 18.7 ± 5.6%, P < 0.001) but not HbA1c levels (7.0 ± 1.1% vs. 6.8 ± 1.3%, P = 0.27) was significantly elevated in low collateralization than in high collateralization group, and correlated inversely with Rentrop score (Spearmen's r = -0.28, P < 0.001; Spearmen's r = -0.10, P = 0.09, respectively). There was a trend towards a larger area under the curve of GA compared with that of HbA1c for detecting the presence of low collateralization (0.64 vs. 0.58, P = 0.15). In non-diabetic patients, both GA and HbA1c levels did not significantly differ regardless the status of coronary collateralization. In multivariable analysis, female gender, age > 65 years, smoke, non-hypertension, duration of diabetes > 10 years, metabolic syndrome, eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m2, and GA > 18.3% were independently determinants for low collateralization in diabetic patients.

Conclusions: Increased GA levels in serum are associated with impaired collateral growth in type 2 diabetic patients with stable angina and chronic total occlusion.

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Relative risk for low collateralization in diabetic patients. Data are ORs, with 95% CI in parentheses. (eGFR, estimated glomerular filtration rate).
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Figure 3: Relative risk for low collateralization in diabetic patients. Data are ORs, with 95% CI in parentheses. (eGFR, estimated glomerular filtration rate).

Mentions: Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that in non-diabetic patients, female gender (P = 0.01), age > 65 years (P = 0.04), non-hypertension (P = 0.02), dyslipidemia (P = 0.02), and eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P = 0.04) were independently associated with low collateralization. In diabetic patients, after adjusting for possible confounding factors including age, gender, BMI, risk factors for coronary artery disease, duration of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, impaired renal function, and multivessel disease, GA > 18.3% but not HbA1c > 7% remained an independent determinant for low collateralization (Figure 3).


Association of increased serum glycated albumin levels with low coronary collateralization in type 2 diabetic patients with stable angina and chronic total occlusion.

Shen Y, Lu L, Ding FH, Sun Z, Zhang RY, Zhang Q, Yang ZK, Hu J, Chen QJ, Shen WF - Cardiovasc Diabetol (2013)

Relative risk for low collateralization in diabetic patients. Data are ORs, with 95% CI in parentheses. (eGFR, estimated glomerular filtration rate).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License 1 - License 2
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4225762&req=5

Figure 3: Relative risk for low collateralization in diabetic patients. Data are ORs, with 95% CI in parentheses. (eGFR, estimated glomerular filtration rate).
Mentions: Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that in non-diabetic patients, female gender (P = 0.01), age > 65 years (P = 0.04), non-hypertension (P = 0.02), dyslipidemia (P = 0.02), and eGFR < 90 mL/min/1.73 m2 (P = 0.04) were independently associated with low collateralization. In diabetic patients, after adjusting for possible confounding factors including age, gender, BMI, risk factors for coronary artery disease, duration of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, impaired renal function, and multivessel disease, GA > 18.3% but not HbA1c > 7% remained an independent determinant for low collateralization (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: In non-diabetic patients, both GA and HbA1c levels did not significantly differ regardless the status of coronary collateralization.In multivariable analysis, female gender, age > 65 years, smoke, non-hypertension, duration of diabetes > 10 years, metabolic syndrome, eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m2, and GA > 18.3% were independently determinants for low collateralization in diabetic patients.Increased GA levels in serum are associated with impaired collateral growth in type 2 diabetic patients with stable angina and chronic total occlusion.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Rui Jin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai 200025, People's Republic of China. rjshenweifeng@gmail.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: We investigated whether serum glycated albumin (GA) levels are related to coronary collateralization in type 2 diabetic patients with chronic total occlusion.

Methods: Blood levels of GA and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) were determined in 317 diabetic and 117 non-diabetic patients with stable angina and angiographic total occlusion of at least one major coronary artery. The degree of collaterals supplying the distal aspect of a total occlusion from the contra-lateral vessel was graded as low (Rentrop score of 0 or 1) or high collateralization (Rentrop score of 2 or 3).

Results: For diabetic patients, GA (21.2 ± 6.5% vs. 18.7 ± 5.6%, P < 0.001) but not HbA1c levels (7.0 ± 1.1% vs. 6.8 ± 1.3%, P = 0.27) was significantly elevated in low collateralization than in high collateralization group, and correlated inversely with Rentrop score (Spearmen's r = -0.28, P < 0.001; Spearmen's r = -0.10, P = 0.09, respectively). There was a trend towards a larger area under the curve of GA compared with that of HbA1c for detecting the presence of low collateralization (0.64 vs. 0.58, P = 0.15). In non-diabetic patients, both GA and HbA1c levels did not significantly differ regardless the status of coronary collateralization. In multivariable analysis, female gender, age > 65 years, smoke, non-hypertension, duration of diabetes > 10 years, metabolic syndrome, eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m2, and GA > 18.3% were independently determinants for low collateralization in diabetic patients.

Conclusions: Increased GA levels in serum are associated with impaired collateral growth in type 2 diabetic patients with stable angina and chronic total occlusion.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus