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Type A personality, hostility, time urgency and unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates: a matched case-control study.

Shi H, Yang X, Wang J, Xi H, Huang C, He J, Chu M, Zhuang G - BMC Public Health (2013)

Bottom Line: After adjustment for potential confounding factors, TABP remained statistically significant, and the adjusted OR was 5.52 (95% CI: 1.43-21.27); from a comparison of students with TABP to those with TBBP.Both the global TABP and the hostility component were associated with a dose response increase in the risk of non-fatal unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates.Further studies need to be conducted to confirm or reject this correlation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710061, China. zhuanggh@mail.xjtu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: Associations between type A behaviour pattern (TABP) and injuries are inconsistent. These inconsistencies may be due to different effects of various components of TABP, namely time urgency/impatience, hostility and competitive drive. It is important to examine the relationship between the global TABP, its two components, and unintentional injuries, among undergraduates in China.

Methods: On the basis of a previous cross-sectional study, we conducted a matched case-control study. 253 cases and an equal number of age-, gender-, and major-matched controls were included. The questionnaire solicited socio-demographic information, the experience of injuries, the scale of TABP, and other potential confounding factors. Besides the correlation between the global TABP and injuries, the influences of the two components of TABP on injuries were also evaluated. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the crude odds ratios (ORs) and adjusted ORs of injury events.

Results: A dose-response relationship was apparent among students who rated themselves higher on the TABP scale (P-value for trend, 0.002), with a crude OR of 2.93 (95% CI: 0.93-9.19) for injuries comparing those with TABP to those with type B behaviour pattern (TBBP). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, TABP remained statistically significant, and the adjusted OR was 5.52 (95% CI: 1.43-21.27); from a comparison of students with TABP to those with TBBP. A dose-response relationship was also apparent between the hostility component and nonfatal injuries, both in crude analysis and after adjusting for other confounders. The relationship between time-hurry and injuries was not statistically significant, based on univariate and multivariate analyses.

Conclusions: Both the global TABP and the hostility component were associated with a dose response increase in the risk of non-fatal unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates. Further studies need to be conducted to confirm or reject this correlation.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Age, gender, major-adjusted, multivariable-adjusted and fully-adjusted odds ratios for unintentional injuries by TU component quintiles.
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Figure 3: Age, gender, major-adjusted, multivariable-adjusted and fully-adjusted odds ratios for unintentional injuries by TU component quintiles.

Mentions: The same process of analysis was applied for the time urgency (TU) component; the results are presented in Table 5. Surprisingly, there were no statistical associations between time urgency and injuries in both the crude model and the adjusted models controlling for other confounders. The dose response relationship between the time urgency component and injuries is also not statistically significant (Table 5, Figure 3).


Type A personality, hostility, time urgency and unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates: a matched case-control study.

Shi H, Yang X, Wang J, Xi H, Huang C, He J, Chu M, Zhuang G - BMC Public Health (2013)

Age, gender, major-adjusted, multivariable-adjusted and fully-adjusted odds ratios for unintentional injuries by TU component quintiles.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4225751&req=5

Figure 3: Age, gender, major-adjusted, multivariable-adjusted and fully-adjusted odds ratios for unintentional injuries by TU component quintiles.
Mentions: The same process of analysis was applied for the time urgency (TU) component; the results are presented in Table 5. Surprisingly, there were no statistical associations between time urgency and injuries in both the crude model and the adjusted models controlling for other confounders. The dose response relationship between the time urgency component and injuries is also not statistically significant (Table 5, Figure 3).

Bottom Line: After adjustment for potential confounding factors, TABP remained statistically significant, and the adjusted OR was 5.52 (95% CI: 1.43-21.27); from a comparison of students with TABP to those with TBBP.Both the global TABP and the hostility component were associated with a dose response increase in the risk of non-fatal unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates.Further studies need to be conducted to confirm or reject this correlation.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, Shaanxi 710061, China. zhuanggh@mail.xjtu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: Associations between type A behaviour pattern (TABP) and injuries are inconsistent. These inconsistencies may be due to different effects of various components of TABP, namely time urgency/impatience, hostility and competitive drive. It is important to examine the relationship between the global TABP, its two components, and unintentional injuries, among undergraduates in China.

Methods: On the basis of a previous cross-sectional study, we conducted a matched case-control study. 253 cases and an equal number of age-, gender-, and major-matched controls were included. The questionnaire solicited socio-demographic information, the experience of injuries, the scale of TABP, and other potential confounding factors. Besides the correlation between the global TABP and injuries, the influences of the two components of TABP on injuries were also evaluated. Conditional logistic regression was used to determine the crude odds ratios (ORs) and adjusted ORs of injury events.

Results: A dose-response relationship was apparent among students who rated themselves higher on the TABP scale (P-value for trend, 0.002), with a crude OR of 2.93 (95% CI: 0.93-9.19) for injuries comparing those with TABP to those with type B behaviour pattern (TBBP). After adjustment for potential confounding factors, TABP remained statistically significant, and the adjusted OR was 5.52 (95% CI: 1.43-21.27); from a comparison of students with TABP to those with TBBP. A dose-response relationship was also apparent between the hostility component and nonfatal injuries, both in crude analysis and after adjusting for other confounders. The relationship between time-hurry and injuries was not statistically significant, based on univariate and multivariate analyses.

Conclusions: Both the global TABP and the hostility component were associated with a dose response increase in the risk of non-fatal unintentional injuries among Chinese undergraduates. Further studies need to be conducted to confirm or reject this correlation.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus