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Chlamydia prevalence in the general population: is there a sex difference? a systematic review.

Dielissen PW, Teunissen DA, Lagro-Janssen AL - BMC Infect. Dis. (2013)

Bottom Line: Prevalence rates for men and women were described as well as highest prevalence rate by age and sex.The absence of symptoms in population-based urogenital chlamydia infection is common in men and women (mean 88.5% versus 68.3%).A modest sex difference is apparent.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Primary care and Community Care, Radboud University medical center, P,O, Box 9101, Nijmegen 6500HB, The Netherlands. Patrick.Dielissen@radboudumc.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: The focus of Chlamydia trachomatis screening and testing lies more on women than on men. The study aim was to establish by systematic review the prevalence of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in men and women in the general population.

Methods: Electronic databases and reference lists were searched from 2000 to 2013 using the key words "Chlamydia trachomatis", "population-based study" and "disease prevalence". Reference lists were checked. Studies were included in the analysis if Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence was reported for both men and women in a population-based study. Prevalence rates for men and women were described as well as highest prevalence rate by age and sex. The difference in prevalence between the sexes in each study was calculated.

Results: Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria and quality assessment for the review. In nine of the twenty-five studies there was a statistically significant sex difference in the chlamydia prevalence. In all nine studies the prevalence of chlamydia was higher in women than in men. The prevalence for women varied from 1.1% to 10.6% and for men from 0.1% to 12.1%. The average chlamydia prevalence is highly variable between countries. The highest prevalence of chlamydia occurred predominantly in younger age groups (< 25 years). The absence of symptoms in population-based urogenital chlamydia infection is common in men and women (mean 88.5% versus 68.3%).

Conclusions: The urogenital chlamydia trachomatis prevalence in the general population is more similar than dissimilar for men and women. A modest sex difference is apparent. The prevalence rates can be used to inform chlamydia screening strategies in general practice.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Flowchart of search, inclusions and exclusions from the systematic review.
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Figure 1: Flowchart of search, inclusions and exclusions from the systematic review.

Mentions: We performed a search of the literature in the electronic bibliographic databases PubMed, Embase and CINAHL for English-language articles published between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2012. The following search terms were used: “Chlamydia trachomatis” AND “prevalence” AND “population-based study OR population”. Reference lists of included articles were checked for potential studies. Also, the reference lists of selected systematic reviews were hand-searched for further publications of interest [16,24,25]. A flow chart of the search is shown in Figure 1.


Chlamydia prevalence in the general population: is there a sex difference? a systematic review.

Dielissen PW, Teunissen DA, Lagro-Janssen AL - BMC Infect. Dis. (2013)

Flowchart of search, inclusions and exclusions from the systematic review.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4225722&req=5

Figure 1: Flowchart of search, inclusions and exclusions from the systematic review.
Mentions: We performed a search of the literature in the electronic bibliographic databases PubMed, Embase and CINAHL for English-language articles published between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2012. The following search terms were used: “Chlamydia trachomatis” AND “prevalence” AND “population-based study OR population”. Reference lists of included articles were checked for potential studies. Also, the reference lists of selected systematic reviews were hand-searched for further publications of interest [16,24,25]. A flow chart of the search is shown in Figure 1.

Bottom Line: Prevalence rates for men and women were described as well as highest prevalence rate by age and sex.The absence of symptoms in population-based urogenital chlamydia infection is common in men and women (mean 88.5% versus 68.3%).A modest sex difference is apparent.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Primary care and Community Care, Radboud University medical center, P,O, Box 9101, Nijmegen 6500HB, The Netherlands. Patrick.Dielissen@radboudumc.nl.

ABSTRACT

Background: The focus of Chlamydia trachomatis screening and testing lies more on women than on men. The study aim was to establish by systematic review the prevalence of urogenital Chlamydia trachomatis infection in men and women in the general population.

Methods: Electronic databases and reference lists were searched from 2000 to 2013 using the key words "Chlamydia trachomatis", "population-based study" and "disease prevalence". Reference lists were checked. Studies were included in the analysis if Chlamydia trachomatis prevalence was reported for both men and women in a population-based study. Prevalence rates for men and women were described as well as highest prevalence rate by age and sex. The difference in prevalence between the sexes in each study was calculated.

Results: Twenty-five studies met the inclusion criteria and quality assessment for the review. In nine of the twenty-five studies there was a statistically significant sex difference in the chlamydia prevalence. In all nine studies the prevalence of chlamydia was higher in women than in men. The prevalence for women varied from 1.1% to 10.6% and for men from 0.1% to 12.1%. The average chlamydia prevalence is highly variable between countries. The highest prevalence of chlamydia occurred predominantly in younger age groups (< 25 years). The absence of symptoms in population-based urogenital chlamydia infection is common in men and women (mean 88.5% versus 68.3%).

Conclusions: The urogenital chlamydia trachomatis prevalence in the general population is more similar than dissimilar for men and women. A modest sex difference is apparent. The prevalence rates can be used to inform chlamydia screening strategies in general practice.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus