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Natural thermal adaptation increases heat shock protein levels and decreases oxidative stress.

Oksala NK, Ekmekçi FG, Ozsoy E, Kirankaya S, Kokkola T, Emecen G, Lappalainen J, Kaarniranta K, Atalay M - Redox Biol (2014)

Bottom Line: We compared fish naturally living in a hot spring with relatively high water temperature (34.4±0.6°C) to those living in normal river water temperature (25.4±4.7°C), and found that levels of all the studied HSPs (HSP70, HSP60, HSP90, HSC70 and GRP75) were higher in fish living in elevated water temperature compared with normal river water temperature.In contrast, indicators of oxidative stress, including protein carbonyls and lipid hydroperoxides, were decreased in fish living in the elevated temperature, indicating that HSP levels are inversely associated with oxidative stress.The present results provide evidence that physiologically increased HSP levels provide protection against oxidative stress and enhance cytoprotection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Physiology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Surgery, Medical School, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.

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Stress protein levels in Garra rufa fish grown in normal river temperature (C, n=20) or in hot spring representing elevated water temperature conditions (HS, n=19) by Western blot analysis. Data are shown as mean±standard deviation. A representative Western blot is shown. Statistical symbols: ** p<0.01; *** p<0.001.
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f0005: Stress protein levels in Garra rufa fish grown in normal river temperature (C, n=20) or in hot spring representing elevated water temperature conditions (HS, n=19) by Western blot analysis. Data are shown as mean±standard deviation. A representative Western blot is shown. Statistical symbols: ** p<0.01; *** p<0.001.

Mentions: Higher levels of HSP60 (p<0.001), HSP70 (p<0.001), HSP90 (p<0.001), GRP75 (p<0.001) and HSC70 (p<0.01) were observed in HS muscle tissue compared with C (Fig. 1).


Natural thermal adaptation increases heat shock protein levels and decreases oxidative stress.

Oksala NK, Ekmekçi FG, Ozsoy E, Kirankaya S, Kokkola T, Emecen G, Lappalainen J, Kaarniranta K, Atalay M - Redox Biol (2014)

Stress protein levels in Garra rufa fish grown in normal river temperature (C, n=20) or in hot spring representing elevated water temperature conditions (HS, n=19) by Western blot analysis. Data are shown as mean±standard deviation. A representative Western blot is shown. Statistical symbols: ** p<0.01; *** p<0.001.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4225528&req=5

f0005: Stress protein levels in Garra rufa fish grown in normal river temperature (C, n=20) or in hot spring representing elevated water temperature conditions (HS, n=19) by Western blot analysis. Data are shown as mean±standard deviation. A representative Western blot is shown. Statistical symbols: ** p<0.01; *** p<0.001.
Mentions: Higher levels of HSP60 (p<0.001), HSP70 (p<0.001), HSP90 (p<0.001), GRP75 (p<0.001) and HSC70 (p<0.01) were observed in HS muscle tissue compared with C (Fig. 1).

Bottom Line: We compared fish naturally living in a hot spring with relatively high water temperature (34.4±0.6°C) to those living in normal river water temperature (25.4±4.7°C), and found that levels of all the studied HSPs (HSP70, HSP60, HSP90, HSC70 and GRP75) were higher in fish living in elevated water temperature compared with normal river water temperature.In contrast, indicators of oxidative stress, including protein carbonyls and lipid hydroperoxides, were decreased in fish living in the elevated temperature, indicating that HSP levels are inversely associated with oxidative stress.The present results provide evidence that physiologically increased HSP levels provide protection against oxidative stress and enhance cytoprotection.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Physiology, University of Eastern Finland, Kuopio, Finland; Department of Surgery, Medical School, University of Tampere and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus