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Nodding syndrome in Kitgum District, Uganda: association with conflict and internal displacement.

Landis JL, Palmer VS, Spencer PS - BMJ Open (2014)

Bottom Line: Data were obtained from publicly available information reported by the Ugandan Ministry of Health (MOH), the Armed Conflict Location & Event Data (ACLED) Project of the University of Sussex in the UK, peer-reviewed publications in professional journals and other sources.Cases rapidly increased annually beginning in 2001, with peaks in 2003-2005 and 2008, 5-6 years after peaks in the number of wartime conflicts and deaths.Peaks of Nodding syndrome reported by the MOH are associated with, but temporally displaced from, peaks of wartime conflicts, deaths and household internment, where infectious disease was rampant and food insecurity rife.

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Affiliation: Global Health Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.

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Temporal relationship between conflict events, deaths (number of deaths) and approximate number of new Ministry of Health (MOH)-reported cases of Nodding syndrome. Kitgum District, 1997–2010/2011.
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BMJOPEN2014006195F2: Temporal relationship between conflict events, deaths (number of deaths) and approximate number of new Ministry of Health (MOH)-reported cases of Nodding syndrome. Kitgum District, 1997–2010/2011.

Mentions: Between the years 1997 and 2011, the period for which data are available, peaks in conflict events as well as deaths arise in 1998, 2000 and 2003 (figure 2). Estimated deaths are conservative because ACLED records the maximum number of deaths per incident as ‘one hundred’. Reports of NS in northern Uganda began to appear in 1997, with the first recorded cases in Kitgum in 199815 (table 1). Cases rapidly increased annually beginning in 2001, with peaks in 2004 (2003–2005) and 2008, followed by a decline toward present-day baseline levels. The 2003–2005 and 2008 peaks of NS cases appeared 6 and 5 years, respectively, after the 1998 and 2003 conflict casualty peaks.


Nodding syndrome in Kitgum District, Uganda: association with conflict and internal displacement.

Landis JL, Palmer VS, Spencer PS - BMJ Open (2014)

Temporal relationship between conflict events, deaths (number of deaths) and approximate number of new Ministry of Health (MOH)-reported cases of Nodding syndrome. Kitgum District, 1997–2010/2011.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC4225239&req=5

BMJOPEN2014006195F2: Temporal relationship between conflict events, deaths (number of deaths) and approximate number of new Ministry of Health (MOH)-reported cases of Nodding syndrome. Kitgum District, 1997–2010/2011.
Mentions: Between the years 1997 and 2011, the period for which data are available, peaks in conflict events as well as deaths arise in 1998, 2000 and 2003 (figure 2). Estimated deaths are conservative because ACLED records the maximum number of deaths per incident as ‘one hundred’. Reports of NS in northern Uganda began to appear in 1997, with the first recorded cases in Kitgum in 199815 (table 1). Cases rapidly increased annually beginning in 2001, with peaks in 2004 (2003–2005) and 2008, followed by a decline toward present-day baseline levels. The 2003–2005 and 2008 peaks of NS cases appeared 6 and 5 years, respectively, after the 1998 and 2003 conflict casualty peaks.

Bottom Line: Data were obtained from publicly available information reported by the Ugandan Ministry of Health (MOH), the Armed Conflict Location & Event Data (ACLED) Project of the University of Sussex in the UK, peer-reviewed publications in professional journals and other sources.Cases rapidly increased annually beginning in 2001, with peaks in 2003-2005 and 2008, 5-6 years after peaks in the number of wartime conflicts and deaths.Peaks of Nodding syndrome reported by the MOH are associated with, but temporally displaced from, peaks of wartime conflicts, deaths and household internment, where infectious disease was rampant and food insecurity rife.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Global Health Center, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon, USA.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus